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Comment Re:Sounds reasonable to me. (Score 1) 573

Servers mean you are serving data to others, which means that you are providing a service, which means that you are probably running a business for-profit or otherwise, which means you are not a consumer and should not be paying the lower price given to the consumer user base. This is not complicated. As to the NAT, I've never heard of an ISP doing this... the ISPs I use never seemed to care how many PCs were sharing a connection via NAT/Firewall (Rogers and Shaw).

Comment On free good tools (Score 2) 128

Just my two bits, I have been using Embedded IDEs for over 10 years and not found any good free ones. The issue is that it takes a lot of effort to get an embedded IDE to be not only useable, but really seamless. The points of difficulty are usually in the debugger and in the physical connection to the processor

These days the pysical interface is mainly JTAG which replaced the venerable (and expensive) ICE (In circuit emulator). In the past, many processor manufacturers would not release specs for their JTAG, to make ppl buy their IDE. TI was notorious for this. This made writing a free and open source IDE really difficult to do.

There are IDEs which are good wrappers for the compiler (Eclipse, Code::Blocks, etc.) but most of them use the generic GNU debugger (GDB) and this has never been my favorite debugger for *embedded* targets where you need to; quickly reset&re-run, perform inspection of variables and RAM contents (memory dumps), add breakpoints on data, not just functions, be able to debug all the way down to the iron, and other tasks.

The challenges in embedded firmware is that, for the most part, you are writing your own kernel and program all wrapped up in one executable, so there is no separate kernel always there in the background. The IDE and debugger have to support this type of basic program.

Hardware

Submission + - Raspberry Pi sells over a million units (blogspot.ca)

An anonymous reader writes: The darling of low cost DIY micro computers has moved over a million units. No small feat considering there are only 2 official distributers. Despite the low specs (and low cost) they`re turning out to be pretty hackable little things, nice project.

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