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Comment Re:Fuel (Score 1) 353

Street legal is not quite the same thing. Until quite recently, there was no such thing as an engine that wasn't street legal. (but definitely requirements to make a car street legal). So a street engine would naturally be an engine practical for normal street driving: No need for massive power or responsiveness, just something to get the job done, low maintenance, easy to operate, likes regular gas, quiet, etc.

Meanwhile, a racing engine would have power and responsiveness and to hell with mileage, smooth idle, regular gas, etc and who cares if it needs careful tuning a couple times a month. It might or might not overheat if left idling too long and you may want to put the battery on trickle charge since the alternator pulley might have been resized. It surely won't have an a/c compressor.

Racing engines (especially modified stock engines) might sacrifice reliability or durability to gain their power.

I am definitely not 12, but when I was 8 I could tune an engine and there was no such thing as an ECU.

You seem to keep making an ass of yourself and then trying to change the question or redefine terms to squeek past. Are you in politics?

Medicine

Low-Protein Diet May Extend Lifespan 459

sciencehabit writes "A new theory about the foods that can extend life is taking shape, and it's sure to be a controversial one. Two studies out this week, one in mice (PDF) and another primarily in people (PDF), suggest that eating relatively little protein and lots of carbohydrates — the opposite of what's urged by many human diet plans, including the popular Atkins Diet — extends life and fortifies health."

Comment Re:Unregulated currency (Score 1) 704

The reason that the people who took the loans aren't held as guilty as the people who loaned the money is because many people have experienced being talked into something by a fast-talking salesman who sold them something they didn't really understand. It's happened to me. You don't expect the people who take out loans to be experts at understanding contract law, and those are the only people who had a reasonable chance of being certain what they had signed. (Even then it's only a reasonable chance. Let me hand you an obfuscated program you've never studied and press you for a quick signature while I tell you about the wonderful things it will do for you.)

For that matter, when is the last time you actually read and understood the EULA for the software you've just installed? Are you sure?

P.S.: The main reason I am now running Linux rather than Apple is that I actually read some of the EULAs. MS was worse, and I left them earlier. And as IANAL, I must admit that perhaps they weren't quite as bad as I believed that they were...but they could as easily have been much worse. But the Real Estate market doesn't have anything analogous to the GPL or BSD licenses.

Comment Re:Unregulated currency (Score 1) 704

While a definite point, that's not an argument that the criminals involved weren't government actors.

This is, after all, one of the things governments do. They destroy competing currencies. And we have considerable evidence that the US govt was seriously involved in researching how bitcoin exchanges worked. We don't have any particular reason to assume that they were the only one. And NO government is going to defend them.

OTOH, this is just an argument of plausibility, and is certainly not a proof. The Russian Mafia might be as plausible an explanation...but I don't really find it any more plausible. (Perhaps if I knew more about what happened, I might alter my beliefs. E.g., if it happened via internal subversion, that might make one player or another more likely...but which?)

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