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Comment All your base are belong to developers anyway... (Score 1) 605

If you have decent developers and they have physical access to their machines (particularly laptops that they can take away from scrutinizing eyes), then they likely already have local admin rights in some form or fashion, whether you want them to or not. It's an asinine waste of resources to try and use an IT group that is usually less competent than the developers to police those developers' local admin rights when they have physical access to their machines.

Comment Re:Industrial! (Score 1) 491

Industrial is the joke engineering degree. Anyone who can't cut it as a chemE or ME, this is the major for you!

Have fun poisoning yourself and losing fingers! I'll be in the air conditioned office working on a spreadsheet, ok?

Comment Re:Industrial! (Score 1) 491

It might not sound like a good solution, but...

-I've only had 2 jobs since my Master's (I quit the first after 5 months because of the cross-country commute...please forgive my improper use of the word "several")
-I've had my current job for the past 3 years, and I'm not scared of being laid off anytime soon
-You should see my paycheck!!

Your allegations of me being an opportunistic job-hopper cut me deep...I'm going to go wipe away my tears with some hundred dollar bills, then put them in a stripper's g-string.

Comment Re:almost like a technical MBA? (Score 1) 491

The lobotomy is actually optional. As for qualifying my reasons for representing it as a "good thing," I was referring to the impact it has had to my career opportunities.

What better way to keep your friends close and your enemies closer than by blending in with the suits in charge while still maintaining your technical prowess?!?

Comment Industrial! (Score 4, Informative) 491

I have an undergraduate degree in Computer Science. When I graduated in 2000, I found a great job, which I was subsequently laid off from during the demise of the dot com bubble.
This freaked me out, so I took a "holding pattern" job for a couple of years until I could afford to go back to grad school. I wanted to get an advanced degree in something very, very general that I could apply to a wide variety of industries.
Industrial Engineering seemed to be the ticket. I have had a very easy time during the several job searches I've had since receiving my Master's.
Also, because of the curriculum requirements (Engineering Economy, Optimization, Project Management/Efficiency), I feel like I have a much easier time relating to my finance and accounting coworkers than many of my engineer counterparts.
I feel that it's almost like a technical MBA with a focus on mathematics geared towards business and process management.

Comment Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research? (Score 1) 149

I wonder if this has applications to any of the experiments done at the Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research department. I seem to remember some of their experiments being dependent upon generating large amounts of *truly* random numbers, usually generated from thermal fluctuations. If you believe them, they were able to generate statistically significant variations in these thermally generated random numbers simply from a person thinking that way...

I know, I know...sounds weird, but read some of their experiments and the outcomes and see what you think.

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