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Comment There is a way (Score 3, Interesting) 321

I could easily pay for a supported version of icewm, but I can't personally pay someone enough to keep it alive.

Sure you can. Find someone to work on it and get them to sign up for Gittip, while you do the same. You can "tip" them a few cents to several bucks per week for their efforts and they can get paid by you and other supporters.

Comment Gittip. (Score 1) 301

You can fund developers individually via Gittip.

WHAT IS GITTIP?

Gittip is a way to give small weekly cash gifts to people you love and are inspired by.
Gifts are weekly. The intention is for people to depend on money received through Gittip in order to pay their bills, and bills are recurring.
Gifts come with no strings attached. You don't know exactly where your gifts come from, and the maximum gift from one person to another is $100 per week.
Gifts are public. The total amount you give and the total amount you receive is public. Participants on both sides of the equation are rewarded publicly for their participation. (You can opt out of publicly displaying your total giving.)
Give by answering Who inspires you? on our homepage, and following the steps.

Comment For the love of crypto (Score 4, Informative) 259

Thailand did not rule Bitcoin illegal. The head of the central bank of Thailand issued a preliminary ruling expressing that Bitcoin may be illegal because there are no laws that allow its use.

Think about that for a moment.

Read: http://qz.com/110164/thailands-infamous-bitcoin-crackdown-is-not-quite-what-it-seems/

Comment No law is needed (Score 1) 318

Customer education is needed. Many of theses devices have upgrades available. Those that don't may not be able to run the newer versions satisfactorily. If a law like this is passed, I see carriers and makers having to shoehorn updates that don't fit and run terribly onto consumer devices that are years out of date.

Carriers and handset makers need to educate customers in order for the customer to protect themselves. The customers themselves need to take responsibility for their device and its security. Carriers' and makers' security history should affect their reputation.

Comment Re:A couple questions (Score 1) 187

The initial purpose of keeping the information is completion. I sheepishly admit to digital hoarding, and this may be feeding that desire. To me, it's easier to scan a document and tag it, rather than importing its information.

I need to keep things like receipts for large purchases for insurance, expense, and warranty purposes, bills and account statements, tax documents, and even things like the rare paper letter I get (e.g. my former tax preparer died last year. If I were to be audited, I'd need some evidence that she's dead. I have a letter from her next of kin and coworkers saying that she died.)

I need original paper for SOME receipts, things with raised seals such as birth certificates or car titles, and other unique items that the originality of the paper would increase its authenticity in a court of law.

What you do seems very similar to what I want to do, perhaps with the exception that I'm a metadata nut and want to be able to search things a little easier, should the need ever arise.

Comment Re:Smartphone (Score 1) 187

Using Camscanner or its ilk is something that a few friends have suggested, but I find the quality of the scans to be less than I really want for long-term archival. This may suffice for many documents that I'm likely never to look at again, such as bills, but things like letters or tax documents I think may require a little higher quality. Also, if a document is more than one page, camera scanning quickly gets unwieldy. I scanned a 30 page document on the go using Camscanner and it was a painful experience.

Comment Re:My Workflow (Score 1) 187

That's actually a good feature I'd not considered. As a document is added to the system, sign it using PGP and store the signature. That way, I have reasonable certainty that the document has not been modified since initial ingestion, or at least a warning that it may have been compromised if the signature doesn't check out.

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"Card readers? We don't need no stinking card readers." -- Peter da Silva (at the National Academy of Sciencies, 1965, in a particularly vivid fantasy)

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