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Android

Video Splashtop's Cliff Miller Talks About Their New Linux App (Video) 96

Yes, you can now have full remote access to your home computer or a server at work that's running Ubuntu Linux. Really any Linux distro, although only Ubuntu is formally supported by Splashtop. What? You say you already control your home and work Linux computers from your Android tablet with VNC? That there's a whole bunch of Android VNC apps out there already? And plenty for iOS, too? You're right. But Cliff says Splashtop is better than the others. It can play video at a full 30 frames per second, and has low enough latency (depending on your connection) that you can play video games remotely in between taking care of that list of server issues your boss emailed to you. Or perhaps, in between work tasks, you take a dip in the ocean, because you're working from the beach, not from a stuffy office. It seems that work and living locations get a little more remote from each other every year, and Splashtop is helping to make that happen. This video interview is, itself, an example of how our world has gotten flatter; Cliff was in China and I was in Florida. The connection wasn't perfect, but the fact that we could have this conversation at all is a wonder. Please note, too, that while Cliff Miller is now Chief Marketing Officer for Splashtop, he was also the founder and first CEO of TurboLinux, so he is not new to Linux. And Splashtop is the company that supplied the "instant on" Linux OS a lot of computer manufacturers bundled with their Windows computers for a few years. Now, of course, they're focusing on the remote desktop, and seem to be making a go of it despite heavy competition in that market niche.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Would Charles Darwin Have Made a Good Congressman? 155

sciencehabit writes "It's a good 130 years too late to answer that question empirically, but at least symbolically Charles Darwin has won support from more than 4000 voters in the 10th congressional district of Georgia, thanks to an initiative headed by James Leebens-Mack, a plant biologist at the University of Georgia in Athens. Like many others, Leebens-Mack was deeply troubled by a speech his Congressman, Paul Broun (R-GA), gave at an Athens church in October deriding teachings on evolution, embryology, and the big bang theory as 'lies straight from the pit of Hell.' Broun, a medical doctor, is a member of the U.S. House of Representative's Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, and chair of its Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight. Leebens-Mack says the 'protest vote should make it clear to future opponents that there are a lot of people in the district who are not happy with antiscience statements.'"
The Courts

Scientists Who Failed to Warn of Quake Found Guilty of Manslaughter 459

An anonymous reader notes that the BBC reports "Six Italian scientists and an ex-government official have been sentenced to six years in prison over the 2009 deadly earthquake in L'Aquila. A regional court found them guilty of multiple manslaughter. Prosecutors said the defendants gave a falsely reassuring statement before the quake, while the defence maintained there was no way to predict major quakes. The 6.3 magnitude quake devastated the city and killed 309 people." The scientists were first charged more than two years ago.
Software

Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal Out Now; Raring Ringtail In the Works 318

An anonymous reader writes "The six month cycle that Canonical adheres to for Ubuntu releases has come around again today. Ubuntu 12.10 'Quantal Quetzal' has been released. There's a whole range of new features and updates, but here are the most important: WebApps — treats online services as if they are desktop apps (Gmail, Twitter, Facebook); Online Services — control logins to all your services from a single window and get them integrated into search results (e.g. GDocs for file searches); Dash Preview — right click any icon, get a detailed preview of what it is; Linux kernel 3.5.4; GNOME 3.6; Nautilus 3.4; latest Unity; No more Unity 2D, fallback is the Gallium llvmpipe software rasterizer; Default apps updated (Firefox 16.01, Thunderbird 16.01, LibreOffice 3.6.2, Totem, Shotwell, Rythmbox); Full disc encryption available during install; Single, 800MB distribution for all architectures." It's now available for download. The next version, due in six months' time, will be called Raring Ringtail.

Comment Re:That's great and all, but . . . (Score 3, Informative) 146

Well...arguably. This is the exact same argument as Apache vs Nginx, where Apache spawns a child process per client, whereas Nginx has a limited number of worker processes that handle a queue of requests as they become free. Nginx definitely has an advantage in terms of RAM when servicing thousands of (truly) simultaneous requests.

While Postgresql does use the Apache model, there is middleware available (google 'pgpool' for an example) that amongst other things will queue requests so they can be serviced by a limited number of children. Of course this only matters if there are an awful lot of simultaneous queries (without the corresponding amount of server RAM).

However; your claim about threads per CPU is oversimplified, and especially wrong with a DB server where processes will most likely be IO bound. With 1 core, for example, there is nothing wrong with having 5 processes parsing and planning a query for a few microseconds, while the 6th is monopolising IO actually retrieving query results. Or the reverse - having 1 CPU-bound process occasionally being interrupted to service 5 IO bound processes, which would negligibly impact the CPU-bound query, while hugely improving latency on the IO bound queries.

Comment Re:That's great and all, but . . . (Score 3, Informative) 146

Each client connected to the DB has its own child process - the shared memory is a buffer that is shared across postgresql child PIDs with the same parent. That's why the proposed patch would work using an anonymous shared memory segment - because the memory is only passed to children of the same process.
Announcements

Want to Change the Slashdot Logo? For 1 Day in October, You Can 128

The Slashdot logo has been around for a long time now; the truth is, we're rather fond of it, and have only rarely introduced substantial changes. But for the month of October, as a way of celebrating the site's 15 years of delivering News for Nerds, we invite you to help us temporarily change it. If you have an idea of what the Slashdot logo should look like for one day in October, this is your chance to see it on the page. Starting September 15th, we'll be accepting entries, and sending limited edition anniversary T-shirts to the artists we pick to show off on the page throughout the month. (And a Nexus 7 tablet to the artist who ranks best in show.) Click through for information on what we're looking for, how to enter, and the long list of rules that the legal department has provided for your reading pleasure; we look forward to seeing and sharing your ideas.

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