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Television

Submission + - Tiger Team Pilot Episode Streaming on Court TV

ChazeFroy writes: The pilot episode of Tiger Team is now available on Court TV's website in streaming flash format. Tiger Team (previously mentioned on Slashdot here) follows a group of penetration testers as they attempt to defeat the security of organizations through social engineering, wired and wireless penetration testing, and physically exploiting security weaknesses in an organization's infrastructure. The pilot episode involves testing an exotic car dealership in California that sells Lotuses, Lamborghinis, Ferraris, and Rolls Royces. You don't have to think too hard about how this episode ends up. It's also great to see Court TV take proactive steps to support new shows by making them available to the masses for free.
Television

Submission + - Tiger Team: Penetration Testing TV Series Dec 25 (courttv.com)

ChazeFroy writes: CourtTV (TruTV) has a new series starting Dec 25 at 11 pm called Tiger Team. It follows a group of elite penetration testers hired to test organizations' security using social engineering, wired/wireless penetration testing, and physically defeating security mechanisms (lock picking, dumpster diving, going through air vents/windows). They do all of this while avoiding the organizations' various security defenses as well as law enforcement. The stars of the show also did a radio spot this morning in Denver, and its MP3 is here.
Censorship

Submission + - AT&T Censors Pearl Jam anti-Bush Lyrics on Web

ChazeFroy writes: During Sunday's live webcast of Pearl Jam's Lollapalooza show, AT&T censored anti-Bush lyrics sung by Eddie Vedder. Vedder sang 'George Bush, leave this world alone' and 'George Bush, find yourself another home' to the tune of Pink Floyd's 'Another Brick in the Wall'. AT&T attributed it to a mistake by the webcast vendor. However, net neutrality advocates are citing this as a prime example of how AT&T and other providers can censor whatever they want, even though they say they would never do that. To quote pearljam.com: 'AT&T's actions strike at the heart of the public's concerns over the power that corporations have when it comes to determining what the public sees and hears through communications media. Most telecommunications companies oppose "net neutrality" and argue that the public can trust them not to censor. What happened to us this weekend was a wake up call, and it's about something much bigger than the censorship of a rock band.'

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