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Music

Submission + - Mixing Music (and selling it) is Racketeering?

yfarren writes: "DJ Drama and DJ Don Cannon were arrested (and have now been released on $100,000 bail) on racketeering charges. For what? Apparently, mixing other musicians music.

I thought that you could make derivative works. That part of the rights of the public was to make derivative, aka, new, creative works. Apparently, that will get you slammed, for racketeering.

Of specific concern is a quote in the article (I couldn't verify it) that the RIAA plans to "step up law enforcement training and commit additional investigative resources in all of the cities." Wow. since when does a private organization get to step up law enforcement?"
The Courts

Submission + - Spammer Convicted of Phishing Scam

eldavojohn writes: "Jeffrey Brett Goodin has been convicted under the 2003 CAN-SPAM Act. He is facing a sentence of up to 101 years in a federal prison after being found guilty. From the article, "The law forbids e-mail marketers from sending false or misleading messages and requires them to provide recipients with a way to opt out of receiving future mailings." And somehow he's the first person to violate this law since 2003? I'd gladly turn over my inbox to the DoJ if it results in even one of the people responsible spending 101 years in federal-pound-me-in-the-ass prison!"
Printer

Submission + - The Surprising Security Threat: Your Printers

jcatcw writes: Networked printers are more vulnerable to attack than many organizations realize. Symantec has logged vulnerabilities in five brands of network printers. Printers outside firewalls, for ease of remote printing, may also be open to easy remote code execution. They can be possible launching pads for attacks on the rest of the network. Disabling services that aren't needed and keeping up with patches are first steps to securing them.
Security

Submission + - Corporate Networks at Risk from Employee Behaviour

An anonymous reader writes: From EWeek: Research by FaceTime Communications has found risky Internet activity by employees poses an increasing threat to network security for corporate enterprises. While the number of unique malware instances was down last year when compared with the 2000 identified in 2005, FaceTime researchers warn today's malware is stealthier, more complex and harder to identify and defend against. According to an analysis of threats tracked or identified by FaceTime Security Labs, 1,224 unique threats on "greynet" applications — programs that network users download and install on their computers, usually without the knowledge of their IT department — were reported in the past year, with attacks over peer-to-peer networks increasing by 140 percent over 2005 levels and multichannel attacks jumping to 29 percent of all attacks in 2006 from 18 percent the prior year.

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