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Comment Re:Occam's Razor (Score 1) 392

I think it is the "originally" that is the point. Hypercard was an interesting prototyping tool. It was both really powerful and really limited, but was especially nice for trying things out quickly. I remember attending a MacHack where Danny Goodman was the presenter on a new thing called Hypercard. He was so enthusiastic it was easy to get excited, but the reality was a little less. We played with it some at work but mostly stuck with C or Pascal for things that mattered.

Comment Re:who hasn't burned out? (Score 1) 602

I wrote my first programs in 1972 and I still program for a living. It used to be decks of cards, then hardcopy terminals, then "glass" terminals, then smart terminals connected to old mainframes, CDC Cybers, DEC, Data General and Prime mini and supermini computers, then Apple IIs and Commodores, then early PCs with DOS, then the early Macintoshes and Windows machines, scientific workstations from Sun and HP, played with Crays for a while, then back to new Macintoshes and desktop workstations. I've programmed databases, scientific modeling, data acquisition and control systems for nuclear reactors, internet banking applications, data archiving, device control, financial institutions and national laboratories, web applications, UNIX network applications, Macintosh GUI things, FORTRAN, BASIC, Smalltalk, Lisp, Pascal, C, C++, PHP, shell scripts, DCL, MUMPS, Ada, ... I've taught at the university level and programmed for fun with my kids.

I still like going to work every day. I still read up on new technologies. I can tell I'm not as keen to keep learning the latest and greatest, but I had a pretty good 35 year run before feeling any burnout. If you're feeling it after 10 years then something seems wrong to me. I felt like I was just really getting good at stuff about that time.

Crime

Girls Bugged Teachers' Staff Room 227

A pair of enterprising Swedish schoolgirls ended up in court after they were caught bugging their teachers break room. The duo hoped they would hear discussions about upcoming tests and school work, allowing them to get better grades. It worked until one of them decided to brag about it on Facebook, and the authorities were called in. The girls were charged with trespassing and fined 2,000 kronor ($270) each in Stockholm District Court.

Comment Re:Code format (Score 1) 580

I call BS.

80 columns is how many characters fit on a punch card. Period. They made terminals to be that width because of the punch cards, not the other way around. I programmed for a quite a few years before the glass terminal was even invented.

Comment library routines are compiled (Score 1) 752

A lot of PHP code is just making function calls to the built-in library functions anyway, and those library routines are all compiled C/C++. If I call a library function from C or from PHP there is some difference in overhead when setting up the call and processing the results but the actual function is likely to be the exact same thing.

Comment who cares? (Score 1) 836

I don't care where a co-worker went to school, I just want to see his or her code and documentation and talk with them about the thought process that went into their work. Results matter. I've worked with PhDs from hot shot schools (CMU, MIT, etc) and I've worked with self taught folks. Both have been good and not good. The bottom line is who gets the work done, not who knows more theory.

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