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Comment Re:If we could only get the gov't out of the way.. (Score 4, Insightful) 206

There was no money in the internet either until the 1990s. I guess building it before then was a waste of time and money.

And who was developing the Internet until the 1990's? The government. Specifically, DARPA and NSF. And a bunch of universities, probably funded by government grants.

Comment Re:$500M/80K = how much? (Score 3, Informative) 299

Sounds like Rosa Martinez might be getting back more than $870/mo worth. Even going all the way back to 1996, that's an average of about $40,000/mo per person.

What are you smoking? $500 million, divided by 80,000 people is an average of $6250 per person, total. Assuming they were all getting $870 per month, they were being paid for an average of a little over 7 months.

Comment Re:OpenBSD? (Score 1) 219

but isn't it all about the userspace, which is pretty much the same?

In general, you're correct. Apache (on, say, NetBSD)is generally as secure as Apache (on Linux). However, OpenBSD has reviewed a lot of the ported applications, and so Apache (on OpenBSD) should be better than other versions of Apache. That review may be done by other operating systems (e.g. the RedHat/Fedora version of Apache, if you get the RPM), but OpenBSD is famous for it.

Hardware Hacking

Submission + - A Chip-sized Linux Computer

An anonymous reader writes: LinuxDevices has an article about a tiny Linux computer that is contained within a package the size of a modern PC processor. The tiny module plugs into a 462-pin CPU-style socket and integrates an Atmel AT91RM9200 processor clocked at 180MHz, along with 512MB of NOR flash, 256MB of SDRAM, network PHYs, and other functions. It also contains a Xilinx Spartan 3E Series FPGA with 30,000 logic elements that can be put to use for custom requirements. So, Slashdotters, what would YOU like to build with one of these?
Announcements

Submission + - Eclipse Ships Largest-Ever Release (eclipse.org)

Wayne Beaton writes: "The Eclipse Foundation today announced the availability of its annual coordinated project release, this year code named Europa. Europa features 21 Eclipse projects for software developers and is more than double the size of last year's record-setting release.

The release consists of more than 17 million lines of code and the contributions of over 310 open source developers located in 19 different countries. The 2006 release, code named Callisto, involved 10 project teams, 7 million lines of code, and 260 open-source developers in 12 countries. This is the fourth year in a row the Eclipse community has shipped a major release on schedule.

Innovations in the Europa release include new runtime technology for creating server applications, developer tools for service-oriented architecture (SOA), tools for improving team collaboration and support for users of the popular Ruby programming language."

Encryption

Submission + - Macrovision responds to Steve Jobs on DRM

An anonymous reader writes: Macrovision Corporation, best known for its long history of DRM implementations, (everything from VCRs to software copy protection), has responded to Steve Jobs open letter regarding DRM. With ample experience and despite the obvious vested interests, it's great to hear their point of view.

In the letter they acknowledge the "difficult challenges" of implementing DRM that is truly "interoperable and open"; but they also feel that DRM "will increase electronic distribution", if implemented properly, because "DRM increases not decreases consumer value", such as by enabling people to "rent" content at a lower price than ownership, and lowering risks for content producers.

While I'm impressed they responded, I can't say I'm impressed by lofty goals that might not be reached for years. The reality is, current DRM implementations often leave users with the bad end of the deal. What do you think? Should people give DRM manufacturers more time to overcome the challenges and get it right?
Graphics

Submission + - Nvidia Unlocks Computing Potential in Graphics Chi

kog777 writes: Graphics chipmaker Nvidia Corp. (Nasdaq: NVDA) said Friday that it has released a new software development tool that will allow programmers to tap into the power of its processors, opening the door to solve complex computing problems. The firm's core product, the graphics processor (GPU) has traditionally been used to create complex 3D images in games and design software. Over the years, the GPU has become increasingly adept in handling mathematically intense calculations — functions specifically needed for graphics. Nvidia's CUDA development kit, however, promises to bring those functions outside of gaming, empowering scientists and engineers with raw processing power. http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/20070216/nvidia-cu da-sdk.htm
Education

Submission + - LSU Professor Resolves Einstein's Twin Paradox

justelite writes: "Subhash Kak, Delaune Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at LSU, recently resolved the twin paradox, known as one of the most enduring puzzles of modern-day physics. In more recent times, the paradox has been described using the analogy of twins. If one twin is placed on a space shuttle and travels near the speed of light while the remaining twin remains earthbound, the unmoved twin would have aged dramatically compared to his interstellar sibling, according to the paradox."
Microsoft

Submission + - Iraq War Planned Using PowerPoint Slides

Phobos writes: "The BBC is covering the NSA's (no, not that one, the other one) uncovering of a pre war powerpoint presentation.

These documents show how unrealistic the Iraq invasion was from the beginning. By this time, only 5,000 troops were to be in Iraq, with the rest having been redeployed. Retired Army Col. Andrew Bacevich said that PowerPoint war planning was the ultimate insult:

"Here may be the clearest manifestation of OSD's [Office of Secretary of Defense] contempt for the accumulated wisdom of the military profession and of the assumption among forward thinkers that technology — above all information technology — has rendered obsolete the conventions traditionally governing the preparation and conduct of war. To imagine that PowerPoint slides can substitute for such means is really the height of recklessness.""
Television

Submission + - Inventor of the TV remote dies

QuietLagoon writes: Zenith Electronics Corporation said today that Engineer Robert Adler, who co-invented the TV remote control with fellow Engineer Eugene Polley, has passed on to the big sofa in the sky. In his six-decade career with Zenith, Adler was a prolific inventor, earning more than 180 U.S. patents. He was best known for his 1956 Zenith Space Command remote control, which helped make TV a truly sedentary pastime. The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences awarded Adler and co-inventor Polley, another Zenith engineer, an Emmy in 1997 for the landmark invention.
Networking

Submission + - DD-WRT now running on X86

JimBowen writes: "The popular linux-based router firmware project, DD-WRT, based on the free OpenWRT, has recently been made to run on an ordinary PC. This allows a significant increase in performance by the use of much faster hardware, with more memory, enabling advanced SPI firewalls even in the presence of high load P2P software. Various community extensions provide support for extra features like NAS. With the combination of large, desktop-sized storage, this makes for an extremely powerful, yet manageable and easily deployable home server. There is a tutorial on how to set it up over at graynetwork.org."

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