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Graphics

DX11 Tested Against DX9 With Dirt 2 Demo 201

MojoKid writes "The PC demo for Codemasters' upcoming DirectX 11 racing title, Dirt 2, has just hit the web and is available for download. Dirt 2 is a highly-anticipated racing sim that also happens to feature leading-edge graphic effects. In addition to a DirectX 9 code path, Dirt 2 also utilizes a number of DirectX 11 features, like hardware-tessellated dynamic water, an animated crowd and dynamic cloth effects, in addition to DirectCompute 11-accelerated high-definition ambient occlusion (HADO), full floating-point high dynamic range (HDR) lighting, and full-screen resolution post processing. Performance-wise, DX11 didn't take its toll as much as you'd expect this early on in its adoption cycle." Bit-tech also took a look at the graphical differences, arriving at this conclusion: "You'd need a seriously keen eye and brown paper envelope full of cash from one of the creators of Dirt 2 to notice any real difference between textures in the two versions of DirectX."
Games

Review Scores the "Least Important Factor" When Buying Games 169

A recent report from a games industry analyst suggests that among a number of factors leading to the purchase of a video game — such as price, graphics and word of mouth — the game's aggregated review score is the least important measure. Analyst Doug Creutz said, "We believe that while Metacritic scores may be correlated to game quality and word of mouth, and thus somewhat predictive of title performance, they are unlikely in and of themselves to drive or undermine the success of a game. We note this, in part, because of persistent rumors that some game developers have been jawboning game reviewers into giving their games higher critical review scores. We believe the publishers are better served by spending their time on the development process than by 'grade-grubbing' after the fact."
Cellphones

Submission + - Comic smashes cellphone used to record his act

sam0ht writes: When comedian Lee Hurst spotted an audience member who appeared to be recording his act, he didn't see the funny side.

He took immediate direct action to protect his jokes, grabbing the phone and smashing it on the floor. Defending the rights of comedians, Hurst called it. Criminal damage, Guildford magistrates called it, and fined him £60.

Outside the court, Mr Hurst said: "People should stop filming people at live gigs. When you go to watch a film you get adverts from the Federation Against Copyright Theft, but comedians aren't protected so they are taking the law into their own hands. I don't regret what I did. I have to defend myself. The public probably don't know that every time you send a joke text someone has written that, and they deserve credit."

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