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Sony Reader Now Available 402

Yaksha42 writes "The Sony Reader, which debuted at CES in January, is now available for purchase on the Sony website. The six inch screen uses E Ink, rather than an LCD, to display the text, reducing strain on the eye while reading. While you can buy books on Sony's Connect site, you can also load eBooks and other text onto the Reader in a variety of formats, including PDF and TXT files. It also comes with the ability to receive newsfeeds, display JPG images, and can play unsecured MP3 and AAC music files. Additional information can also be found on the Learning Center site."

Breaking Gender Cliques at Work? 806

An anonymous reader asks: "No-one likes finding themselves being the 'odd one out' of a clique, and gender barriers make them harder to break. The question is simple: what can a girl in IT do when she finds herself on the outside of those cliques of boy coworkers? Or inversely, what should groups of boys at work be doing to be more welcoming for that lone girl in the IT office?"

How are 'Secret Questions' Secure? 116

Anonymous Howard wonders: "It seems that every authentication system these days requires me to provide the answers to several personal questions, such as 'Mother's Maiden Name' and 'Name of High School' for resetting lost passwords. I've always disliked this method because it is completely open to anyone with some personal information about me, but now it seems that its security continues to degrade as more and more Help Desk Reps can easily see this same information about me. Can anyone explain to me how these questions/answers, which seem to vary little among systems, are in the least bit secure?" You have to have some way of identifying yourself if you forget your password. If you feel the same way about these 'secret questions', how would you implement a secure facility to change passwords?

IE7 to be Pushed to Users Via Windows Update 608

dfrick writes "CNET is reporting that IE7 will be pushed to users via Windows Update. This has serious implications for e-commerce websites whose functionality might be affected by any bugs in the software. Also to have end users suddenly using a new browser right before the holiday shopping season could magnify the cost any bugs that might create a bad user experience on sites."

Light-Weight Software Process for ISO 9000? 56

Disgruntled Software Engineer asks: "I work for a large engineering firm and it was recently decided in our company to have our software be ISO 9000 compliant. There exists a software development process in my organization, but it is extremely heavy-weight -- over two-dozen documents totaling 200 pages each! My team doesn't even have the time to read such a process, much less abide by it. I have been tasked by my team in creating a more light-weight process for our team to follow so that our software can pass the audit that is coming soon, but reading through the convoluted ISO website is not helping, and a 'plain English translation' that I found of the standard contains a bulleted list that is 17 pages long! I have not been able to get any idea of how to design a light-weight software engineering process that is ISO 9000 compliant with all of these extremely verbose documents and somewhat odd requirements. Also, the software that my team produces is more for research than for productization, and the dynamic nature of research does not mix well with the rigidity of a software process. What are the bare-minimum set of requirements for ISO 9000 software engineering compliance? What are some tips for designing a process that is light-weight and causes minimal damage in terms of efficient software development? Do you have any interesting experiences or wisdom regarding ISO 9000 and software engineering?"

Linux/Mac/Windows File Name Friction 638

lessthan0 writes "In 1995, Microsoft added long file name support to Windows, allowing more descriptive names than the limited 8.3 DOS format. Mac users scoffed, having had long file names for a decade and because Windows still stored a DOS file name in the background. Linux was born with long file name support four years before it showed up in Windows. Today, long file names are well supported by all three operating systems though key differences remain. "

Java Profilers - Which One Are You Using? 79

splitPersonality asks: "Our Java programmers are researching various profilers to use in-house. We would appreciate some feedback from other shops that are using Java profilers. Along with the specific product, would you please include reasons behind your choice? If you now have misgivings about the one you or your shop chose, please let me know about those, as well."

Pearl Jam Releases Video Under Creative Commons 240

minitrue writes "Pearl Jam released their first music video in quite a while under a Creative Commons license allowing anyone to "legally copy, distribute and share the clip" for noncommercial purposes. Creative Commons thinks this may be the first video produced by a major label ever to be CC-licensed. So although the file is only available as a free download via Google Video through May 24, fans can continue sharing it online themselves in perpetuity."

IBM to Adopt ODF for Lotus Notes 205

Mike Barton writes to tell us InfoWorld is reporting IBM has announced that the upcoming version of Lotus Notes, due out this fall, will feature an "ODF-compatible version of OpenOffice embedded in the Notes e-mail application." IBM hopes that this large scale distribution of the ODF standard will help bolster their foothold in the marketplace since "standards live or die on how many people use them"

Can Ordinary PC Users Ditch Windows for Linux? 1483

Carl Bialik from WSJ writes "Mark Golden, a reporter for Dow Jones Newswires, tried to switch from Windows to Linux, and found it too complex for his liking. He writes: 'For me, though, using the Linux systems didn't make sense. I often send documents and spreadsheets between my home PC and the one at work, which uses Microsoft Office. And the files are sometimes complex. Meanwhile, for both personal and professional computer use, I want access to all multimedia functions. While solutions may exist to almost every problem I encountered, I was willing to invest only a limited amount of time as a system administrator. Claims by some Linux publishers that anybody can easily switch to Linux from Windows seem totally oversold.'"

Oracle to Boost AJAX, Java 25

InfoWorldMike writes "Oracle will submit its AJAX render kit to the open source community, and announce a reference implementation of the Java Persistence Architecture at next week's JavaOne conference." From the article: "To bolster AJAX, Oracle will submit its AJAX render kit to the open source community as a follow-up to a previous donation of JavaServer Faces (JSF) components. 'It allows people to work with the JSF components but [they] can display that using AJAX technology, which basically allows them to [have] a much richer environment in the browser,' said Ted Farrell, chief architect and vice president of tools and middleware at Oracle. "

Critical Security Hole Found in Diebold Machines 306

ckswift writes "From security expert Bruce Schneier's blog, a major security hole has been found in Diebold voting machines." From the article: "The hole is considered more worrisome than most security problems discovered on modern voting machines, such as weak encryption, easily pickable locks and use of the same, weak password nationwide. Armed with a little basic knowledge of Diebold voting systems and a standard component available at any computer store, someone with a minute or two of access to a Diebold touch screen could load virtually any software into the machine and disable it, redistribute votes or alter its performance in myriad ways."

Warhawk and The Dualshake Controller 72

You may recall Warhawk from the Sony conference demo, their flagship 'dualshake' controller product. A few of the news sites have gotten their hands on the game, and have impressions of what it's like to use the PS3 controller with the game. From the Gamespy article: "I was initially very skeptical of how this feature (which looked hastily tacked on to a regular joypad without a rumble) would work, but after a lengthy playtest of WarHawk's 30 percent complete single demo stage, I can safely attest to the excellent maneuverable quality possible from the very first moment you pick up and play. The slight delay at the Sony press conference between Phil Harrison's pivoting, and the on-screen tilting of his rendered joypad meant I was expecting the same problems during my WarHawk piloting. Not so. This works flawlessly, and immediately, and allayed any fears I had that this was a last-minute gimmick designed to tear interest away from the Wii."

Nintendo UK Defends the Wii 123

GamesIndustry.biz is running a story defending the Wii from across the pond. Nintendo's UK boss David Yarnton has nothing but good words for the new name for the Revolution. From the article: "It's like any new name ... it takes a while to get established. I think that you'll find that in not even six months, in a short period of time, people will accept it; they won't be referring to Revolution or next-generation, it'll just be Wii."

Developers React To 'Wii' 499

Gamasutra has reactions from game developers to the announcement of the Revolution's new commercial name, 'Wii'. From the article: "It doesn't change my personal opinions of the console in the slightest. It changes my opinion of the Nintendo marketing department considerably. Did they even bother to research this? Why do they do these things? What was wrong with 'Revolution'? It's bad enough that the Japanese have a drink called "Sweat," but at least they don't try to export it to the English-speaking world with that name. Am I supposed to be happy about having to go down to the game store to purchase the 'Nintendo Wee'? For God's sake, where was Miyamoto? I can't believe he would have let this get by. - Ernest Adams"

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