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AMD

AMD Launches New Mobile APU Lineup, Kabini Gets Tested 102

An anonymous reader writes "While everyone was glued to the Xbox One announcement, Nvidia GeForce GTX 780 launch, and Intel's pre-Haswell frenzy, it seems that AMD's launch was overlooked. On Wednesday, AMD launched its latest line of mobile APUs, codenamed Temash, Kabini, and Richland. Temash is targeted towards smaller touchscreen-based devices such as tablets and the various Windows 8 hybrid devices, and comes in dual-core A4 and A6 flavors. Kabini chips are intended for the low-end notebook market, and come in quad-core A4 and A6 models along with a dual-core E2. Richland includes quad-core A8 and A10 models, and is meant for higher-end notebooks — MSI is already on-board for the A10-5750M in their GX series of gaming notebooks. All three new APUs feature AMD HD 8000-series graphics. Tom's Hardware got a prototype notebook featuring the new quad-core A4-5000 with Radeon HD 8300 graphics, and benchmarked it versus a Pentium B960-based Acer Aspire V3 and a Core-i3-based HP Pavillion Sleekbook 15. While Kabini proves more efficient, and features more powerful graphics than the Pentium, it comes up short in CPU-heavy tasks. What's more, the Core-i3 matches the A4-5000 in power efficiency while its HD 4000 graphics completely outpace the APU."

Comment Re:Open Source, but voids a warranty? (Score 2) 74

You're going to be installing software that they don't know that has low level access to the hardware and could potentially harm it. Voiding the warranty makes sense to me- they can't be responsible for harm done by software they can't control. It doesn't apply to apps, because the apps don't allow direct hardware access except through the APIs Google has written and tested.

Twitter

How To Hack Twitter's Two-Factor Authentication 58

An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from PC Mag's SecurityWatch: "We've pointed out some problems with Twitter's new two-factor authentication. For example, since just one phone number can be associated with an account, Twitter's two-factor authentication won't work for organizations like the Associated Press, The Onion, or The Guardian. They were hacked; they could still be hacked again in the same way. However, security experts indicate that the problem is worse than that, a lot worse."

Comment Re:Wow! (Score 1) 18

"close in age couples" in most states means less than three months difference, not three years difference. We now know the human brain doesn't stop developing for nearly twenty five years after birth, and there is a HUGE cognitive difference in understanding between a fifteen year old and an eighteen year old.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=124119468 for the popularization.
http://harvardmagazine.com/2008/09/the-teen-brain.htmlfor the MRI images
http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog-extra/the-adolescent-brain-beyond-raging-hormonesfor the white paper

There still isn't a "magic number" that divides adulthood from childhood, the individual development of the prefrontal cortex can be complete as early as 17, as late as 25, and the bell curve centers on 21.

But it isn't just "backwater prudes" either, there actually is some science behind it.

Submission + - Ex-Marine detained under Operationn Vigilant Eagle for his political views sues (wtvr.com)

stry_cat writes: You may remember the story of Brandon Raub, who was detained withtout due process over some facebook posts he made. Now with the help of the Rutherford Institute, he is suing his captors.

According to his complaint [PDF], his detention was part of a federal government program code-named “Operation Vigilant Eagle,” which monitors military veterans with certain political views.

Comment Re:Start here (Score 4, Insightful) 1145

Except nobody's feet are exactly 1 foot. Nor is anyone's 1000 paces exactly 1 mile. If those were truly universal measurements, you'd have some point. As they're not, you don't. And in the long term we'd save money by being on the same system as literally every other country in the world by removing the possibility of tooling mistakes, idiocies like NASA Orbiter problem, and additional cost to companies trying to sell in the US of having to have both measurements in their workflows and computer systems.

Comment Re:Good luck with that! (Score 1) 524

I've done a bit of everything (firmware, mobile, back end systems, etc), but admittedly have never set up a distributed message queue. I did work at Amazon for 2 years, they didn't use Rabbit or AMQP for their middleware at that time. No idea if they do now or not. But I have friends who do that stuff and talk shop frequently, and they've never mentioned either. I wonder if its not quite as big as you think it is.

Comment PowerVR (Score 2) 64

The updated kernel gives the BeagleBone Black access to a new Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) display driver architecture

Shame about that PowerVR GPU, I don't see it ever actually being able to take advantage of the newer display architecture. I do like the move towards Device Tree. If it gains traction it might actually be possible to treat ARM boards more like x86 boards, rather than needing the board-specific kernels we have to deal with now.

Submission + - AMD Launches New Mobile APU Lineup, Kabini Gets Tested (tomshardware.com)

An anonymous reader writes: While everyone was glued to the Xbox One announcement, Nvidia GeForce GTX 780 launch", and Intel's pre-Haswell frenzy, it seems that AMD's launch was overlooked. On Wednesday, AMD launched it's latest line of mobile APUs, codenamed Temash, Kabini, and Richland. Temash is targeted towards smaller touchscreen-based devices such as tablets and the various Windows 8 hybrid devices, and comes in dual-core A4 and A6 flavors. Kabini chips are intended for the low-end notebook market, and come in quad-core A4 and A6 models along with a dual-core E2. Richland includes quad-core A8 and A10 models, and is meant for higher-end notebooks — MSI is already on-board for the A10-5750M in their GX series of gaming notebooks . All three new APUs feature AMD HD 8000-series graphics.

Tom's Hardware got a prototype notebook featuring the new quad-core A4-5000 with Radeon HD 8300 graphics, and benchmarked it versus a Pentium B960-based Acer Aspire V3 and a Core-i3-based HP Pavillion Sleekbook 15. While Kabini proves more efficient, and features more powerful graphics than the Pentium, it comes up short in CPU-heavy tasks. What's more, the Core-i3 matches the A4-5000 in power efficiency while its HD 4000 graphics completely outpace the APU.

Although AMD has Kabini poised against Intel's Pentium line, notebooks featuring Core-i3s can be had for just around $50 more. And this is Ivy Bridge that was tested. With Intel's own launch just around the bend, the company will be improving efficiency in the upper-end of the spectrum with Haswell, meanwhile increasing performance on the lower-end with Silvermont-based Atoms. Unfortunately, it appears that Intel could very well manage to lock-in the low-end, just as they've done in the enthusiast segment.

Submission + - How to hack Twitter Two Factor (pcmag.com)

An anonymous reader writes: We've pointed out some problems with Twitter's new two-factor authentication. For example, since just one phone number can be associated with an account, Twitter's two-factor authentication won't work for organizations like the Associated Press, The Onion, or The Guardian. They were hacked; they could still be hacked again in the same way. However, security experts indicate that the problem is worse than that, a lot worse.
Operating Systems

BeagleBone Black Ships With New Linux 3.8 Kernel 64

DeviceGuru writes "BeagleBoard.org has begun shipping its faster, cheaper BeagleBone Black SBC with a new Linux 3.8 kernel, supporting Device Tree technology for more streamlined ARM development. The $45 BeagleBone Black runs Linux or Android on a 1GHz TI Sitara AM3359 SOC, doubles the RAM to 512MB of its predecessor, and adds a micro-HDMI port. The updated kernel gives the BeagleBone Black access to a new Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) display driver architecture, as well as full support for the Device Tree data structure introduced to streamline ARM development in Linux 3.7. The project was hesitant to move up to such a recent kernel, but decided it was time to bite the bullet and support the Device Tree. By doing the hard work of switching to Device Tree now, BeagleBoard.org and its developer community can save a lot of configuration and maintenance headaches down the line, says BeagleBoard.org co-founder Jason Kridner. Fortunately, a modified 3.2 kernel 'coming soon' should provide the necessary bridge from the old cape driver architecture to the new one."

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