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Comment Signaling (Score 1) 347

In many ways the degr is not about leading but signaling prospective employers or clients that you can learn and stick it out through time. If you wind up competing with people who have degrees you may find yourself at a disadvantage no matter how good you are. In addition, as others have pointed about the degree is about learning theory and concepts that you can broadly apply; not building a specific but perishable skill set.

Comment Re:I love the EU (Score 1) 798

Right. So how's the roaming between USA, Canada and Mexico? That's what i thought.

Depends on your plan; but then again the US , Canada and Mexico don't claim to be one common borderless market. the EU carriers have managed to find an excuse to stick it to their customers because you cross an internal border; that would be like the big 4 US carriers charging roaming fees because someone went from Atlanta to Miami. Years ago they did it but that has all but gone away. The US market has evolved differently and pretty much gone to an unlimited use model for calls - given that after hours and mobile to mobile calls don't use minutes.

Comment Re:I love the EU (Score 1) 798

Sorry......I might be late with the reply but I have to.....

You complain about roaming in Europe compared to the US?

Newsflash: Europe consists of _different_ countries!!

My apologies, but your post suggests that you have no idea.

/C

Actually I do; and think if people want to bit h about the US carriers than comparing service areas and prices is not unreasonable. The US not only has 48 contiguous states but also a number of independent nations plus 2 non-contiguous states and a number of territories. So, apology accepted and perhaps you need to answer the clue phone when it rings to discuss cell phone markets. After all, if consumer protection were so important and the EU so grand who cares about things like national borders if yo gruel are one market with one set of boundary less rules?

Comment Re:I love the EU (Score 2) 798

Euro problems or not, but for the customers its great here in Europe.

I never had the situation here that a mobile provider tried to force me onto a certain mobile phone. The reason for this is that the European union has a lot of laws regarding the availability of services everywhere and that no competitor may have a disadvantage by closed markets. In the same way the mobility of the cititzens should not be limited.

Soemthing like: "If you use the phone which we did not sell you, we charge extra" would bring you into an overkill of lawsuits.

Actually, US carriers don't charge extra - they just don't offer a discount and non-contract plans as you go plans are often targeted to people who are total price sensitive (i.e. is it $10 or 430 per card) rather than to the actual cost per minute. There is some movement to offering cheaper no contract plans - Walmart is starting to advertise unsubsidized iPhones with lower per month rates; although their "unlimited" data is really "use more than 2GB per months for a few months and we may not let you renew..." according to the sales rep I talked to when considering it for a second phone.

OTOH, the EU is still in the dark ages when it comes to roaming - why can't my UK SIM work the same way throughout the EU - no charge for incoming calls, same low per minute or text rate everywhere? Roaming fees may be capped but why should there be any? After all, in the US you can roam virtually anywhere; at least with the big 4, for one flat rate.

Comment Re:Unlikely to be discontinued altogether (Score 1) 371

http://www.macworld.com/article/1167247/cook_apple_planning_professional_mac_for_2013.html#lsrc.twt_jsnell

Tim already said it is coming. The email has been confirmed by Apple. "Apple confirmed to Macworld that the message is indeed from Cook."

http://www.macworld.com/article/1167247/cook_apple_planning_professional_mac_for_2013.html#lsrc.twt_jsnell

Tim already said it is coming. The email has been confirmed by Apple. "Apple confirmed to Macworld that the message is indeed from Cook."

No ones doubting the message, just its interpretation. "... something really great late next year..." could mean a new MP desktop or something completely different. People want to believe Apple will continue to build a high end expandable MP but their idea of "really great" may not be that. Hell, it could be an iMac Pro or Mini Pro my point is nowhere in the email does Cook explicitly say a new MP is in the works. The email is classic corporate speak that let's everyone read into it what they want to hear.

it reminds me of the old board game Diplomacy - never make a specific promos is but say things in a way that makes people think you are on their side.

Comment Re:Unlikely to be discontinued altogether (Score 1) 371

Apple: New Mac Pro that will amaze you in 2013. iHaters: Hardly a solid statement on the MP future.

Fair enough - were did Apple definitely state that - rather than it being the conclusion from a series of non-definitive statements? Personally, I'd love to see a new MP but am not holding my breath.

Comment Re:Unlikely to be discontinued altogether (Score 1) 371

Apple does not plan to modify their machines and will simply pull them from market in the EU.

In all likelihood it's because they've got a new Mac Pro model ready to launch. The Mac Pro hasn't had a significant update in years, it's the only Mac that doesn't have a Thunderbolt port, for example.

A new Mac Pro is being released in 2013, confirmed by Apple.

While a new MP may be coming - all the referenced articles said were - MP customers are important, great things are coming to the desktop in 2013, we are working on MP designs which probably will be coming in 2013. Hardly a solid statement on the MP future.

Comment Re:a few ideas (Score 1) 383

I would avoid punctuation as people will get it wrong and not realize the intended person did not get it. Worse, I have an account with a provider that ignores punctuation even though you can put it in your email address so first.last and first last both go to me. I had an idiot admin insist he had the correct email even though I told him I was getting emils with private information from him. He refused to verify the addy and suggested I change mine. I declined and said since I notified him of the privacy violation I had no responsibility for any fallout.

Comment Re:First Sale (Score 1) 321

This has nothing to do with First Sale; it doesn't affect your ability to sell the phone. In-fact, there are specific exception in place for used phones. It even opens a huge loop-hole for unlocking. As used phones are exempt from this decisions all you need to do it "sell" your phone to the person unlocking it for say $1, let them unlock it, and then "buy" it back for $1.

oddly enough, the FAQ linked in the summary states it applies only to phones bought from a carrier - so if I buy my iPhone from a Apple or a reseller who get sthe subsidy it seems the rule does not apply. IANAL but that seems to be another loophole.

Comment Re:Isn't banning unlocking anti-competitive ? (Score 1) 321

In the UK you can buy phones on contract unlocked, and usually cheaper too

You can in the US as well - Sprint and Verizon sell phones with GSM SIM unlocked; and you can buy it at the contract price. You can't take a Verizon Phone to sprint (and vice versa) on the CDMA side even though you can roam on each other's network; but that's not due to locking, in the GSM sense, but do to the way they register phone serials in their database.

>Apparently the free market has failed in the US, because it was able to buy laws designed to distort it in the phone company's favour.

I'm not sure how you come to this conclusion - I can buy an unlocked phone at full retail, a subsidized but locked phone at a discount, or a CDMA phone with the GSM SIM unlocked. Nothing in a free market says someone has to sell you what you want at a price you want; or that failure to offe ryou what you want is a failure of a free market.

Comment Re:The phone books of the past.... (Score 1) 185

You couldn't automate calling every number in the phone book. I agree with you that this is vastly overhyped, but digital storage can't be directly compared to paper storage.

You could also buy databases of all listed US numbers - I've used them in the past to help company's analyze business opportunities by identifying the number and types of businesses in various locations. When I did, it was trivially easy to dump the entire database into Excel or Access and build queries to return the needed information.

Comment Re:funny how everyone 'wants' your phone # (Score 2) 185

last time I went for a haircut, the first thing they asked me was my name. fine, they can call me when the next haircutter is open.

then they wanted my phone #. really? for a date, maybe? ;) (some of they are definitely cute).

reminds me of a rental app I was once asked to fill in. it had the usual ss#, date of birth, full name - but they also asked mothers maiden name. now, I realize that with some work, you can get that from public records, but you have to work for it and its still partially a password of sorts that banks use to verify your ID when you call on the phone (or lost your password for online). a housing rental that wanted pretty much all the info that the bank would ask me to verify my id. yeah, sure, I'll just give you that (not!). when I called the realtor on this, he simply said 'good luck in your search'. basically, he knew he was asking more than he had a right to and simply avoided admitting it.

watch what you give out, people. think about every bit of info and if they don't need it, don't give it to them.

Why do people assume you have to give everyone real info? They have no way of knowing what your mother's maidan name and simply picking something you can remember such as some random street name you like. Unless you pick something truly bizzare, like West 52nd or Avenue of the Americas, Lindy or Ruby should be fine. Oddly enough, the only person I know who has had an issue is because her maiden name only has a few consonants (thanks to the immigration guy at Ellis Island when her grandfather emigrated) and gets questioned when she gives her name. I've done that, along with giving a long defunct corporate phone number and never had an issue; in fact 555-1212 with a random area code works fine for affinity cards.

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