Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Thats one hell of a clause... (Score 1) 112

> If you want to run a SLI setup(2 x HD6990 =500watts each,) people in the US/Canada/Japan are going to be fucked over buying all the top parts because a 15A circuit won't suffice anymore.

Watts don't work like that. Amps = Watts/Volts. You'd need to be pulling 1700 watts to exceed a US-110v circuit, or 2400w for 240v 10amp.

I'm pretty sure you won't be doing that in the near future 8)

--Rob

Comment Re:problem with Scientific Linux (Score 4, Interesting) 90

Unfortunately, there are hundreds of people willing to help with CentOS 6, but the team has just ignored them. There was a 'list of outstanding bugs' that was linked to in the 'When will CentOS 6 be released' thread, and a couple of days after that was posted, every bug had a patch against it.

They ignored that for another couple of months, wrote their own patches, and then went off and did other things.

Whilst Scientific Linux 5.6 is easily installable. Install 5.5 and then run 'yum update'. There's an alpha ISO around, and I think there was a beta due out shortly.

Comment Re:Red Hat (Score 1) 90

Actually, apt is (deliberately) missing a vital system verification tool - a way to verify the consistency of packages. rpm -qv will tell you what files have been changed since a package was installed. The debian way to do it is 'reinstall the package and see what breaks'.

I am not making this up.

Comment OK, so here's what this exploit is. (Score 1) 179

And it's not really an Exploit, either.

1: It's javascript that tries to guess what your modems IP address is. If it's possible for javascript to find out what your IP Address is, it becomes trivial, and it it's possible for javascript to find out what your default route is, then it's solved.

2: It then tries to get into your router. I would assume there would be another js library that it would load, that could be easily kept up to date, containing fingerprints of modems so it can figure out what it is, and try the default (root/password, admin/admin, etc)

3: It then updates the DNS servers in the modem to NOT use the ISP assigned ones, but nasty ones. As your PC queries the modem (99% of the time, unless you've manually changed your DNS servers) for DNS results, if the DNS relay in the modem is pointing to the wrong root, then you'll get crap answers.

I realise they say that using OpenDNS wouldn't avoid this, but I think that's known, technically, as bullshit.

Linux

Submission + - Linux 2.6.34 released

diegocg writes: Linux 2.6.34 has been released. This version adds two new filesystem, the distributed filesystem Ceph and LogFS, a filesystem for flash devices. Other features are a driver for almost-native KVM network performance, the VMware ballon driver, the "kprobes jump" optimization for dynamic probes, new perf features (the "perf lock" tool, cross-platform analysis support), several Btrfs improvements, RCU lockdep, Generalized TTL Security Mechanism (RFC 5082) and private VLAN proxy arp (RFC 3069) support, asynchronous suspend/resume, several new drivers and many other small improvements. See the full changelog here.
Politics

Submission + - Pentagon Hacker Demands Government Payback (thinq.co.uk)

Stoobalou writes: Pentagon hacker, Gary McKinnon has called on the newly-elected British government to put its money where its mouth is and tear up his extradition order.

US prosecutors have been trying to get McKinnon before a New Jersey court for seven years after they caught him hacking into US military and NASA computers for evidence of UFOs.

David Cameron, the newly elected Prime Minister, and Nick Clegg, the Deputy Prime Minister, had both voiced their support for McKinnon's campaign against extradition. Other ministers in the coalition government had branded the extradition unjust. Clegg had even joined McKinnon's mother, Janis Sharp on a protest march.

Operating Systems

Submission + - Create virtual machine image of OS on hard disk 1

skristir writes: I have a couple of old clunker boxes on which I run Windows NT and Windows XP. They are around because I have s/w and data on them that I still need. Having upgraded to a reasonably powerful Linux (Ubuntu) machine, I was hoping that I could create virtual machine images from the hard disk and then de-commission the old hardware. I do have the original install disks, but I am not interested in re-installing all the s/w on a virtual machine. What would be the point of that?! Can anyone suggest how one would go about converting existing s/w on a hard disk into a virtual machine image? I looked at Xen and Virtual Box but not enough information is available. VMWare wants my money but I still don't know if it can do what I want....
Education

Submission + - Call To Halt Donations To Stop Wikipedia Deletions 4

ObsessiveMathsFreak writes: "Howard Tayler, the webcomic artist of Schlock Mercenary fame, is calling on people not to donate money during the latest Wikimedia Foundation fund-raiser, in protest at the "notability purges" taking place throughout Wikipedia, where articles are being removed en-masse by what many see as overzealous admins. The webcomic community in particular has long felt slighted by the application of Wikipedia's contentious Notability policy. Wikinews reporters have recently begun investigating this issue, but are the admins listening? Is Deletionism becoming a dominant ethos on Wikipedia? Are the right people holding the reigns?"
Caldera

Submission + - Via Groklaw Court Rules: Novell owns the UNIX (groklaw.net)

RobertLTux writes: "Quoth PJ
"Court Rules: Novell owns the UNIX and UnixWare copyrights! Novell has right to waive!
  Dated: Friday, August 10 2007 @ 04:52 PM EDT
Hot off the presses: Judge Dale Kimball has issued a 102-page ruling [PDF] on the numerous summary judgment motions in SCO v. Novell. Here is what matters most:

        [T]he court concludes that Novell is the owner of the UNIX and UnixWare Copyrights.

That's Aaaaall, Folks! The court also ruled that "SCO is obligated to recognize Novell's waiver of SCO's claims against IBM and Sequent". That's the ball game. There are a couple of loose ends, but the big picture is, SCO lost. Oh, and it owes Novell a lot of money from the Microsoft and Sun licenses. "

anybody got a good recording of TAPS?"

Operating Systems

Submission + - Judge Kimball rules; Novell owns Unix copyrights (groklaw.net)

Eggplant62 writes: "In his most damaging ruling yet, Judge Kimball today released his ruling in the SCO v. Novell case, saying that it is his belief that after examining the all the documentation and motion practice and after the hearings earlier this year on various summary judgment motions, the jist is: "[T]he court concludes that Novell is the owner of the UNIX and UnixWare Copyrights." Of course, Groklaw is covering the story and broke the news just over a half hour prior to this submission.

There is also a ruling in SCO v IBM on summary judgment motions but the actual rulings are yet to become available. Keep your eyes peeled."

Security

Submission + - Debian remote vulnerability, 35 days & running

An anonymous reader writes: About a month ago, Lighttpd version 1.4.15 was officially released with two important security patches (1, 2). Debian was initially quick to pick up on this version, in fact they did so more than 35 days ago for their work-in-progress "unstable" project. But the official stable distribution of Debian is STILL vulnerable. A bug report tagged "remote root" has been left unanswered for more than a week.
Security

Submission + - The Ten Most Frequently-Guessed Passwords

darkreadingman writes: "IT people often create their own security problems by choosing administrative passwords that are easily hacked. Here's a list of hackers' ten most frequently-guessed passwords, along with some suggestions on better ways to create and maintain strong passwords. http://www.darkreading.com/document.asp?doc_id=117 988&WT.svl=news1_1"

Slashdot Top Deals

"The sixties were good to you, weren't they?" -- George Carlin

Working...