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Submission + - Massachusetts SWAT teams claim they're private corporations, immune to oversight (washingtonpost.com)

thermowax writes: Massachusetts SWAT teams claim they’re private corporations, immune from open records laws. Kind of amusing this is in arch-Liberal Mass, but enough editorializing: I don't even know where to start here. No FOIA demands, no investigations, or reviews... the police state gets more real on a daily basis.

Submission + - Jackson Palmer leaving Dogecoin

pankkake writes: Jackson Palmer, one of the founders of Dogecoin, announced he was leaving because the "movement" felt "cultlike", after being involved in a public argument over Dogecoin's trademark.

Not that people were not warned abundantly.

Dogecoin has been steadily losing value and it is anticipated that it will lose more. The author points that altcoins attract increasingly homogeneous groups, confirming Palmer's statements.

Submission + - Venture-backed Bitcoin miner startup can't deliver on time, gets sued (arstechnica.com)

mpicpp writes: Yet another Bitcoin miner manufacturer, CoinTerra, now faces legal action for not fulfilling an order when it originally promised to. CoinTerra is the third Bitcoin-related startup to face litigation for breach of contract and/or fraud in recent months.
The CoinTerra lawsuit was filed in late April 2014 by an Oakland, California-based man seeking to be the lead plaintiff in a proposed class-action lawsuit. Lautaro Cline, the suit alleges, purchased a TerraMiner IV in October 2013 for delivery by January 2014. The company promised, he claims, that this miner would operate at two terahashes per second and would consume 1,200 watts of power. It did neither.

However, Cline’s suit also claims that CoinTerra did not deliver the miner until February 2014, and it “operated well below the speed advertised and consumed significantly more power than CoinTerra represented, causing Plaintiff to suffer significant lost profits and opportunities.”

Submission + - 'Vigilante motorist' faces fine after using mobile signal jammer to keep others (independent.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: An American driver is facing a $48,000 fine after using a mobile signal jammer in his car to block motorists around him from using their phones on the road.

Jason Humphreys reportedly used the jammer from the back seat of his Toyota Highlander for around two years before being caught by Florida police.

The 60-year-old said that he used the jammer – which transmits radio signals that interfere with mobile phones – because he was ‘fed up’ with watching others use their phones on the road.

Submission + - Xfce: Choice Desktop environment for new Linux Users (thedrinkingrecord.com) 1

MrBingoBoingo writes: A lot has changed and continued to change in the world of Linux and Unix desktop environments. A stong case though can be made that Xfce is the best direction to point new desktop Linix and *nix users towards. With rapid change happening in the world of desktop environments, what direction is really the best to point aspiring Linux users towards?

Submission + - Multi-node OpenStack RDO IceHouse on AWS/EC2 and Google (ravellosystems.com)

iamondemand writes: OpenStack is awesome. But, in order to try out the latest releases you typically need more hardware and time.
Maybe you’ve always wanted to play with and never found the time? Or maybe you did install it, but you had to spend days scrounging for suitable hardware? Or maybe you’re an expert, but you have no way to quickly spin up and down entirely new installs?

Submission + - North Dakota researchers evaluate use of UAS in crop and livestock production

stephendavion writes: Researchers at North Dakota State University (NDSU) are working with the university's Carrington Research Extension Center to evaluate the use of unmanned aircraft system (UAS) to monitor crop and livestock research projects. As part of the study, researchers are using UAS-mounted thermal, infrared sensors and cameras that capture images at specific frequencies to gather data from fields and livestock at specified times. NDSU Extension Service agricultural machine systems specialist and the project lead John Nowatzki said: "There is currently much interest in using UAS in agriculture.

Submission + - How Vacuum Tubes, New Technology Might Save Moore's Law (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: The transistor is one of the most profound innovations in all of human existence. First discovered in 1947, it has scaled like no advance in human history; we can pack billions of transistors into complicated processors smaller than your thumbnail. After decades of innovation, however, the transistor has faltered. Clock speeds stalled in 2005 and the 20nm process node is set to be more expensive than the 28nm node was for the first time ever. Now, researchers at NASA believe they may have discovered a way to kickstart transistors again — by using technology from the earliest days of computing: The vacuum tube. It turns out that when you shrink a Vacuum transistor to absolutely tiny dimensions, you can recover some of the benefits of a vacuum tube and dodge the negatives that characterized their usage. According to a report, vacuum transistors can draw electrons across the gate without needing a physical connection between them. Make the vacuum area small enough, and reduce the voltage sufficiently, and the field emission effect allows the transistor to fire electrons across the gap without containing enough energy to energize the helium inside the nominal "vacuum" transistor. According to researchers, they've managed to build a successful transistor operating at 460GHz — well into the so-called Terahertz Gap, which sits between microwaves and infrared energy.

Comment Re:e. coli and salmonella? (Score 5, Informative) 106

The mention of MRSA in the article was probably erroneous and sloppy reporting. Gram Negative bacteria tend to resist chemotherapy due to robust cell walls. Gram Positive bacteria like MRSA, VRSA, VRE, et al... resist drug therapy by other means. This covers nothing of the most concerning drug resistant bacteria, but merely offers a way to make some bacteria vulnerable to drugs that they were not vulnerable to before.

Submission + - Ask for the resignation of Tom Wheeler (Head of the FCC) (whitehouse.gov)

walterbyrd writes: It is now clear that Tom Wheeler is not a representative of the people, but corporations. Previously to taking his current position Wheeler was the former head of 2 different lobbying organizations, which represented companies like Verizon, Comcast, and At&t. His actions helped turn them into the monopolies that they are today.

Submission + - Endurance experiment writes one petabyte to six consumer SSDs

crookedvulture writes: Last year, we kicked off an SSD endurance experiment to see how much data could be written to six consumer drives. One petabyte later, half of them are still going. Their performance hasn't really suffered, either. The casualties slowed down a little toward the very end, and they died in different ways. The Intel 335 Series and Kingston HyperX 3K provided plenty of warning of their imminent demise, though both still ended up completely unresponsive at the very end. The Samsung 840 Series, which uses more fragile TLC NAND, perished unexpectedly. It also suffered a rash of cell failures and multiple bouts of uncorrectable errors during its life. While the sample size is far too small to draw any definitive conclusions, all six SSDs exceeded their rated lifespans by hundreds of terabytes. The fact that all of them wrote over 700TB is a testament to the endurance of modern SSDs.

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