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Power

Submission + - The Power of a Hot Body 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Depending on the level of activity, the human body generates about 60 to 100 Watts of energy in the form of heat, about the same amount of heat given off by the average light bulb. Now Diane Ackerman writes in the NY Times that architects and builders are finding ways to capture this excess body heat on a scale large enough to warm homes and office buildings. At Stockholm’s busy hub, Central Station, engineers harness the body heat issuing from 250,000 railway travelers to warm the 13-story Kungsbrohuset office building about 100 yards away. First, the station’s ventilation system captures the commuters’ body heat, which it uses to warm water in underground tanks. From there, the hot water is pumped to Kungsbrohuset’s heating pipes, which ends up saving about 25 percent on energy bills. Kungsbrohuset’s design has other sustainable elements as well. The windows are angled to let sunlight flood in, but not heat in the summer. Fiber optics relay daylight from the roof to stairwells and other non-window spaces that in conventional buildings would cost money to heat. Constructing the new heating system, including installing the necessary pumps and laying the underground pipes, only cost the firm about $30,000, says Karl Sundholm, a project manager at Jernhusen, a Stockholm real estate company, and one of the creators of the system. "It pays for itself very quickly," Sundholm adds. "And for a large building expected to cost several hundred million kronor to build, that's not that much, especially since it will get 15% to 30% of its heat from the station.""

Comment Re:Obvious answer.. (Score 1) 514

Listen to lots of music in the language.

you are kidding right? when learning English music was the hardest thing to learn to understand, and even now after many years it's still difficult to pick up words in a lot of cases. Why do you think they have all those 'misheard lyrics' websites?

I would like to see somebody learning English by listening to Elton John songs :)

Submission + - Huge security hole in recent Samsung devices (xda-developers.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A huge security hole has been discovered in recent Samsung devices including phones like the Galaxy S2 and S3. It is possible for every user to obtain root due to a custom faulty memory device created by Samsung.
NASA

Submission + - How NASA uses GPUs to build vivid flight simulators (nvidia.com)

skade88 writes: NASA has used flight simulators for years to train pilots. While most pilots starting their careers have 20/13 vision, most flight sims have output suited for people with 20/40 vision. A team at the NASA Ames research center has designed a new flight sim that is suited for 20/10 vision. This new Human Eye Limited display features 9 projectors (4096×2160) providing a resolution of 36 times that of normal HD TVs. It is a pretty amazing setup, I can't wait to get one at home. I think I have my old F-17A flight sim game from Microprose and my old 486 to run it on. those Pixels will be so high-def it will be crazy! :D
Apple

Submission + - Why Apple and GE Are Bringing Back Manufacturing (forbes.com)

Bryantos3 writes: One way President Obama acquired a reputation for being “hostile to business” was his propensity to pose awkward questions to business leaders. In February 2011, for instance, in the middle of a breakfast with the titans of Silicon Valley, President Obama declined to offer the kind of adulation to which these warrior gods of the C-suite have become accustomed. Instead, he interrupted Steve Jobs, the legendary CEO of Apple, and asked what it would take to make iPhones in the United States.
Google

Submission + - Python creator Guido van Rossum leaving Google for Dropbox (dropbox.com)

mrvan writes: "Guido van Rossum, the proclaimed python Benevolent Dictator For Life, is leaving Google in january to work for Dropbox. He is currently employed by Google, where he spends half his time developing the Python language. In their announcement, DropBox state that they relied heavily on python from the beginning, citing a mix of simplicity, flexibility, and elegance, and are excited to have GvR on the team. While this is without a doubt good news for DropBox, the big question is what this will mean for python (and for google)."
Data Storage

Submission + - Are SSDs the best backup medium for family pictures, videos, and such?

An anonymous reader writes: Hey Slashdot, Given the risks of archiving family memories to CDs / DVDs (dust, scratches, media failure), and the (relatively) risky idea of backing things up to a spinning hard drive, I'm wondering if SSDs are the best option for long-term, easily accessible storage of family pictures, videos, etc? Ideally, the sectors of the disk would only be written to once (since we're only backing up things we want to keep), so that mitigates SSD's limited number of writes, but what are any other risks with storing memories long term on SSDs? Thanks.
News

Submission + - In The World of Big Stuff, the U.S. Still Rules (wsj.com)

westlake writes: From Peoria and the WSJ a look at the giant trucks manufactured by Komatsu and Caterpillar.

" In certain areas — notably aircraft, industrial engines, excavators and railway and mining equipment — the U.S. exports far more than it imports. These industries produce relatively small numbers of very expensive goods, requiring specialized technology and labor. Their competitive advantage rests partly on expertise built by U.S. companies in making durable, high-tech weaponry and other equipment for the military — frequently applicable to other products."

It may surprise the geek to learn that Komatsu doesn't employee a single industrial robot. The quality of workmanship simply isn't there where it is needed,In World of Big Stuff, the U.S. Still Rules

United States

Submission + - Apple is assembling their new iMacs in the USA (appleinsider.com) 2

skade88 writes: Some of the new iMacs are shipping with a sticker which reads "Assembled in the USA.". Is this a great thing for the economy to bring back high paid manufacturing jobs to the USA or just apple realizing the patent litigation wars they started have likely burned too many bridges, forcing them to manufacture their own stuff?

Submission + - Never mind talent: Practice, practice, practice (philly.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Me, I want to be a natural. I want to show up at the first class and discover I have a knack for whatever it is we're going to study — pottery, Japanese calligraphy, racquetball, oil painting, flute. I don't mind work, as long as it comes easily, with guaranteed results. But I'm usually the class dunce, or at least that's what it feels like as I struggle to keep up after the going gets tough. Eventually I quit, loath to spend precious effort on what could be a mediocre outcome.

Sound familiar?

But my four daughters turned out differently. They don't think about talent, because it's beside the point. Like the proverbial tortoise, they make slow and steady strides in disciplines that are difficult for them, eventually surpassing more gifted hares. They weren't born this way. Their approach to learning came about as a lucky accident.

Apple

Submission + - Some Apple iMac's "Assembled in America" (appleinsider.com) 1

whisper_jeff writes: A number of newly-purchased standard units are showing an "Assembled in America" notation. While the markings don't necessarily mean that Apple is in the midst of transferring its entire assembly operation from China to the U.S., it does indicate that at least a few of the new iMacs were substantially assembled domestically.
Google

Submission + - How Google's Search Manipulation Can Hurt the Consumer (digitaltrends.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Critics of Google have started questioning whether the company has begun quietly exploring a system of pay-to-play for placement in its search results, an accusation that Google firmly denies. But some are loudly questioning whether a company in control of 65.3 percent of search – processing more than one billion search queries a day – can be completely unbiased when creating a search algorithm in which its own products, and the products of its advertisers, are competing for rankings. Unfortunately for Google, those critics include the Federal Trade Commission.
Government

Submission + - Sandia Lab celebrates original "Mr. Clean" the clean room inventor (networkworld.com) 1

coondoggie writes: "Sandia National Laboratories physicist Willis Whitfield, 92, passed away earlier this month and left a technological legacy that continues to reverberate today: The legendary clean room.

The original laminar-flow 10 x 6 clean room developed 50 years ago by Whitfield was more than 1,000 times cleaner than any cleanrooms used at the time and ultimately revolutionized microelectronics, healthcare and manufacturing development. According to Sandia, with slight modifications, it is still the clean room standard today."

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