Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Rolling out bugs every 6 months. (Score 2) 177

So far, the only review I've read about Ubuntu 13.04 said that promised features such as more customizable privacy settings and Smart Scopes didn't make it into the release because they were too buggy. It's just too amusing to have read that review the day after I read an article about how Ubuntu is ditching the rolling release model. Guess Ubuntu users will have to wait until October.

Other amusing features in 13.04: a button that shows the desktop, and a workspace switcher (disabled by default) that lets you know which workspace you're currently using. Wow, Ubuntu. Unity is on pace to have all the desktop features that Gnome 2 and Xfce have had for years by 2016.

Submission + - Privacy Groups Attack UK ISPs 'Collusion' With Government Snooping

judgecorp writes: Pprivacy groups have accused British ISPs of a 'conspiracy of silence' over the impact of the UK government;s proposed CommUNications Data Bill or "Snooper's Charter". The letter accuses the SPs of allowing themselves to be "co-opted as an arm of the state" — and of not telling their customers what they are up to. Under the bill, ISPs can be ordered to store their users' communications data (the who when and where but not the content of emails etc) for police to search through.

Comment shut up about freedoms (Score 2) 604

Commenters whining about loss of freedom clearly don't live in Boston. It took five days from the bombings to having both suspects off the street. No civilians were hurt after the bombings. One police officer lost his life, and one was critically wounded in their efforts to bring the suspects to justice. If you are not impressed by that, you're not human. That's why, in Boston, we were applauding law enforcement, not bitching about some imaginary freedoms that you wont actually lose. Shut up already.

Comment I have an idea! (Score 0) 628

Wouldn't it be nice if there were a whole bunch of third-party desktop environments from which to choose? That way, if you don't like one, you can use a different one, or use more than one, instead of waiting for the next release, all the while hoping that MSFT changes the desktop environment to be better suited to you personally. While they're at it, they can shrink their OS size to be less than tens of GB, get rid of the registry, and separate user space from kernel space! Oh! oh! and while they're at it, they could add support for other filesystems, like ext3/4 and zfs!

If only there were an OS that had all this...

Comment Here's an idea! (Score 1) 3

Wouldn't it be nice if there were a whole bunch of third-party desktop environments from which to choose? That way, if you don't like one, you can use a different one, or use more than one, instead of waiting for the next release, all the while hoping that MSFT changes the desktop environment to be better suited to you personally. While they're at it, they can shrink their OS size to be less than tens of GB, get rid of the registry, and separate user space from kernel space! Oh! oh! and while they're at it, they could add support for other filesystems, like ext3/4 and zfs!

If only there were an OS that had all this...
Science

Submission + - A Computer Inside a Cell (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: For the first time, synthetic biologists have created a genetic device that mimics one of the widgets on which all of modern electronics is based, the three-terminal transistor. Like standard electronic transistors, the new biological transistor is expected to work in many different biological circuit designs. Together with other advances in crafting genetic circuitry, that should make it easier for scientists to program cells to do everything from monitor pollutants and the progression of disease to turning on the output of medicines and biofuels.

Comment Re:missing physics? (Score 1) 8

Industry's 100+ year-lifetime claim is based on write-wear alone, which is pretty much correct, but a marketing ploy. SSD's fail from firmware problems and other hardware problems unrelated to write-wear.

True, prices are coming down, but spinning storage is still much cheaper, especially at the high-end, though the high-end doesn't much matter to desktop users. I can get a quality 3TB HDD for $150, but it would be hard to find a 1TB SSD for less than $2500. I could be wrong, but I don't think 3TB SSDs even exist yet.

Comment missing physics? (Score 1) 8

My guess is that physics has something to do with it; the disk head has to focus a magnetic field on a very small area. But, I am no physics expert. We could take this idea to its logical conclusion and ask, why does the disk need to spin? We could cover the entire platter with heads.

Is the spinning disk industry really being rocked? SDDs cannot come close to the capacity per dollar that spinning disks offer. The two can be efficiently (both cost-wise and performance-wise) used in tandem by using the SSD as a cache.

Comment weak conclusion (Score 1) 1

"If this estimate is given a causal interpretation, it means that clicks on legal purchase websites would have been 2 percent lower in the absence of illegal downloading websites," according to the study. If it is given a casual interpretation they can come to pretty much any conclusion. All the study really shows is that people who like music are more likely to visit more media outlets to acquire it, be them legal or otherwise. I'd like to see a better analysis on this topic just because I am actually curious to know whether or not piracy hurts online record sales.

Slashdot Top Deals

Work is the crab grass in the lawn of life. -- Schulz

Working...