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Submission + - New 'Zombie' Cells Outperform the Living in the Lab

An anonymous reader writes: For all fans that follow The Walking Dead, it turns out the dead may indeed outperform the living. Scientists have created "zombie" mammalian cells that function better after they die. Although creating "zombie" cells may seem like a dubious endeavor, it has quite a few practical applications. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico coated a cell with a silica solution. This created a near-perfect replica of the structure that could simplify a wide variety of commercial fabrication processes. In fact, the process allowed the researchers to preserve cells down to the minor grooves of its DNA.
Technology

Submission + - SSD Write Endurance Considered... Sufficient (ef.gy)

jyujin writes: Ever wonder how long your SSD will last? It's funny how bad people are at estimating just how long "100,000 writes" are going to take when spread over a device that spans several thousand of those blocks over several gigabytes of memory. It obviously gets far worse with newer flash memory that is able to withstand a whopping million writes per cell. So yeah, let's crunch some numbers and fix that misconception. Spoiler: even at the maximum SATA 3.0 link speeds, you'd still find yourself waiting several months or even years for that SSD to start dying on you.

Comment Re:Awesome (Score 1) 1176

I call BS as well. Yes the ignition might be computer controlled, and yes the automatic transmission might be computer controlled, but the brake pedal will always work and will overpower the engine even if it running full power. There are exceptions of course, such as boiling the name fluid from long brake applications with not enough force.

Submission + - Tesla Hits Back Against New York Times' John Broder (teslamotors.com)

SomePgmr writes: "After the notorious, scripted failure of a Tesla on the popular show Top Gear, Tesla Motors has made a practice of enabling all on-board logging for any vehicle given to the media for review. It appears this practice has paid off, as Tesla responds to New York Times' John Broder's review of a Tesla Model S. The summary of log data is pretty damning."

Comment Re:the offending texts (Score 2) 464

Why cloud the situation with facts? :) Here's the interesting part: "Because the software is licensed, not sold, Microsoft reserves all rights (such as rights under intellectual property laws) not expressly granted in this agreement. In particular, this license does not give you any right to, and you may not: use or virtualize features of the software separately, publish, copy (other than the permitted backup copy), rent, lease, or lend the software; transfer the software (except as permitted by this agreement), attempt to circumvent technical protection measures in the software, reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble the software, except if the laws where you live permit this even when our agreement does not. In that case, you may do only what your law allows. " So by buying it you aren't actually buying it, you are long term leasing it. This way they can circumvent all usual consumer purchasing rights.

Submission + - Super Bowl Blackout Caused by Defective Rrotective Relay (nationalgeographic.com)

wilby writes: Power company says Super Bowl blackout was caused by device designed to prevent power outages. A device designed to improve the Superdome electrical system reliability instead caused it to shut down dramatically during Super Bowl 47.

Entergy New Orleans, which provides power to the venue, said testing traced the source of the problem to an "electrical relay device "it had installed in December to protect Superdome equipment in case a cable failure occurred between the company's switchgear and the stadium.

Submission + - Documentary: The Pirate Bay AFK (tpbafk.tv)

terbeaux writes: The documentary "TPB AFK" follows the creators of The Pirate Bay: Peter Sunde, Fredrik Neij and Gottfrid Svartholm; through their technical and logistical trials of keeping TPB online as well as their court appearances in Sweden.

After its premiere at Berlin International Film Festival, TechCrunch is reporting that TPB AFK is now available under a Creative Commons license for purchase, download on TPB, or viewing on YouTube. The budget for the film was raised on kickstarter where they achieved twice the funding goal in the allotted month long funding campaign.

The film already has 40,000 YouTube views, 19,000 torrent seeders, and over 2,000 paid downloads. There are public screenings happening world wide.

Science

Submission + - Why do astronauts get sick in space? (geek.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: In the years since astronauts started spending long stretches of time in space, we’ve known that weightlessness has a negative impact on health. The immune response just doesn’t seem to hold up the way it does on Earth. Some research on the International Space Station (ISS) may point to the culprit.

The experiment was conducted by ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter over the course of five months in 2006. Reiter maintained two cultures of human cells: one free-floating in weightlessness and the other in simulated gravity using a centrifuge. The preserved cells were later examined back on Earth and the weightless cells were in markedly worse shape than the ones kept in simulated gravity. It took some time to sort out, but researchers now think they know what cellular process is being short circuited by weightlessness.

Submission + - Parcel sensor knows your delivery has been dropped (newscientist.com) 1

Hamsterdan writes: Called DropTag, the gadget combines a battery, a low-energy Bluetooth transmitter, an accelerometer and a memory chip. Stuck on a parcel as it leaves an e-commerce warehouse, it logs any g-forces above a set risky shock level that it experiences. The idea is that when the courier puts it in your hands, you turn on Bluetooth on a smartphone running a DropTag app and scan it before you sign for it.
Facebook

Submission + - Dad Bribes Teenage Daughter $200 To Deactivate Facebook Account (geekyportal.com)

geekspy writes: A 14 year old girl from Boston received $200 bribe from his father to quitting the Facebook for five months. John Baier is a research consultant who wasn’t very happy with her daughter because of spending so much time on the social networking site. So, in order to make her stop, he signed an agreement with the little girl.

According to the agreement, John Baier will pay $50 up front for deactivating her account and another $150 after the successful completion of the five month period that is the end of the June.

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