Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Submission + - Super Bowl Blackout Caused by Defective Rrotective Relay (nationalgeographic.com)

wilby writes: Power company says Super Bowl blackout was caused by device designed to prevent power outages. A device designed to improve the Superdome electrical system reliability instead caused it to shut down dramatically during Super Bowl 47.

Entergy New Orleans, which provides power to the venue, said testing traced the source of the problem to an "electrical relay device "it had installed in December to protect Superdome equipment in case a cable failure occurred between the company's switchgear and the stadium.

Submission + - Documentary: The Pirate Bay AFK (tpbafk.tv)

terbeaux writes: The documentary "TPB AFK" follows the creators of The Pirate Bay: Peter Sunde, Fredrik Neij and Gottfrid Svartholm; through their technical and logistical trials of keeping TPB online as well as their court appearances in Sweden.

After its premiere at Berlin International Film Festival, TechCrunch is reporting that TPB AFK is now available under a Creative Commons license for purchase, download on TPB, or viewing on YouTube. The budget for the film was raised on kickstarter where they achieved twice the funding goal in the allotted month long funding campaign.

The film already has 40,000 YouTube views, 19,000 torrent seeders, and over 2,000 paid downloads. There are public screenings happening world wide.

Science

Submission + - Why do astronauts get sick in space? (geek.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: In the years since astronauts started spending long stretches of time in space, we’ve known that weightlessness has a negative impact on health. The immune response just doesn’t seem to hold up the way it does on Earth. Some research on the International Space Station (ISS) may point to the culprit.

The experiment was conducted by ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter over the course of five months in 2006. Reiter maintained two cultures of human cells: one free-floating in weightlessness and the other in simulated gravity using a centrifuge. The preserved cells were later examined back on Earth and the weightless cells were in markedly worse shape than the ones kept in simulated gravity. It took some time to sort out, but researchers now think they know what cellular process is being short circuited by weightlessness.

Submission + - Parcel sensor knows your delivery has been dropped (newscientist.com) 1

Hamsterdan writes: Called DropTag, the gadget combines a battery, a low-energy Bluetooth transmitter, an accelerometer and a memory chip. Stuck on a parcel as it leaves an e-commerce warehouse, it logs any g-forces above a set risky shock level that it experiences. The idea is that when the courier puts it in your hands, you turn on Bluetooth on a smartphone running a DropTag app and scan it before you sign for it.
Facebook

Submission + - Dad Bribes Teenage Daughter $200 To Deactivate Facebook Account (geekyportal.com)

geekspy writes: A 14 year old girl from Boston received $200 bribe from his father to quitting the Facebook for five months. John Baier is a research consultant who wasn’t very happy with her daughter because of spending so much time on the social networking site. So, in order to make her stop, he signed an agreement with the little girl.

According to the agreement, John Baier will pay $50 up front for deactivating her account and another $150 after the successful completion of the five month period that is the end of the June.

Encryption

Submission + - Deloitte: Use a longer password in 2013. Seriously. (deloitte.com) 1

clustro writes: Deloitte predicts that eight character passwords will become insecure in 2013. Humans have trouble remembering passwords with more than 7 characters, and it is difficult to enter long, complex passwords into mobile devices. Users have not adapted to increased computing power available to crackers, and continue to use bad practices such as using common and short passwords, and re-using passwords across multiple websites. A recent study showed that using the 10000 most common passwords would have cracked >98% of 6 million user accounts. All of these problems have the potential for a huge security hazard. Password vaults are likely to become more widely used out of necessity. Multifactor authentication strategies, such as phone texts, iris scans, and dongles, are also likely to become more widespread, especially by banks.

Submission + - Programmer Interrupted (ninlabs.com)

gameweld writes: Some key findings from a study of 10,000 programming sessions recorded from 86 programmers using Eclipse and Visual Studio:
A programmer takes between 10-15 minutes to start editing code after resuming work from an interruption.
When interrupted during an edit of a method, only 10% of times did a programmer resume work in less than a minute.
A programmer is likely to get just one uninterrupted 2-hour session in a day.

Education

Submission + - German science minister stripped of her PhD (nature.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In a move likely to have major political implications, the University of Düsseldorf has revoked the doctoral degree of Germany’s science and education minister, Annette Schavan. The commitee investigating allegations of plagiarism came to the conclusion that she "systematically and deliberately claimed as her own intellectual achievements which she had in fact not produced herself". Schavan wants to appeal the decision in court and has not resigned from her post so far.
Security

Submission + - Raspberry Pi used for prototype hardware laptop docking station backdoor (nccgroup.com)

An anonymous reader writes: At Black Hat Europe in March a security researcher from NCC Group will show how a Raspberry Pi can be used as a hardware backdoor when built into a modified laptop docking station. While details on their blog are a little light at the moment it shows how versatile the platform is and the diverse applications outside of learning..
Intel

Submission + - Intel Gigabit NIC Packet of Death (krisk.org)

An anonymous reader writes: All it takes is a quick Google search to see that the Intel 82574L ethernet controller has had at least a few problems. Including, but not necessarily limited to, EEPROM issues, ASPM bugs, MSI-X quirks, etc. We spent several months dealing with each and every one of these. We thought we were done.

Using Ostinato I was able to craft various versions of this packet — an HTTP POST, ICMP echo-request, etc. Pretty much whatever I wanted. With a modified HTTP server configured to generate the data at byte value (based on headers, host, etc) you could easily configure an HTTP 200 response to contain the packet of death — and kill client machines behind firewalls!

IOS

Submission + - Hidden 'radio' buttons discovered in Apple's iOS 6.1 (cnet.com)

tad001 writes: C|NET is reporting 'Discovered last night within a freshly jailbroken iPad: a set of buttons and code references for "radio," a feature found in iTunes on Macs and PCs, but not on the iPad or iPhone.' ... 'The buttons hint at Apple's much-rumored radio service, a product that will let people stream music much like they do on the popular Pandora service, but with deep ties to Apple's iTunes library.' ... 'The discovery follows a high-profile jailbreak of iOS 6.1, the updated system software Apple released just last week. A team of developers came up with a tool that gives users deep system-level access to do things like install applications from third-party app stores, change the look and feel of iOS, and add new software features.'
Movies

Submission + - UK Court: MPAA Not Entitled To Profits From Piracy (itworld.com)

jfruh writes: "The MPAA and other entertainment industry groups have been locked for years in a legal struggle against Newzbin2, a Usenet-indexing site. The MPAA contends that, since Newzbin2 profits from making it easier for users to find pirated movies online, the MPAA can sue to take those profits on behalf of its members, who produced that content in the first place. But a British court has rejected that argument."
Science

Submission + - Gut Bacteria Liberate Hidden Toxins Found In Grains (acs.org)

MTorrice writes: "Crops such as wheat and corn sometimes harbor chemicals from molds that grow on the plants. Some of these compounds are seemingly harmless derivatives of toxins produced by the fungi. For the first time, researchers have shown that human gut bacteria can break down these compounds and release the toxins, which can cause gastrointestinal and neurological damage in people. The findings suggest that these masked toxins may not stay hidden within our digestive tracts, and that government agencies may need to regulate the chemicals, the researchers say."

Slashdot Top Deals

"An ounce of prevention is worth a ton of code." -- an anonymous programmer

Working...