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Comment shallow bugs no bugs! Shallow = obvious fix (Score 1) 117

> In a sense, the camaraderie of an OSS project negates much of the many-eyes potential to find flaws.

This is, I believe, a misunderstanding of the statement. I'm a little surprised ESR didn't clear this up, but the original statement is "with enough eyeballs bugs are shallow ... the fix will be obvious to someone."

Linus' law (written by ESR) does not say "there will be no bugs". It says that if enough people look at a bug "the solution will be obvious to someone".
Any programmer has had the experience of spending hours chasing a bug down, starting from the symptom and going through many functions in many files to eventually figure it out. That's a deep bug. This is a shallow bug:

if ($password_entered == $correct_password) {
        deny_access();
} else {
        allow_access();
}

You won't spend hours hunting down the bug in the code above, it's right there where you'd start looking. That's a shallow bug, the problem and solution is obvious.
With enough programmers examining the code, one of them will solve a bug quickly, it will seem shallow to them. That's an entirely different statement from "there will be no bugs".

Comment because it's a cheap, easy, fun proof of concept (Score 4, Insightful) 70

You wouldn't use an RPi in production, of course. x86 would be just as silly. A $3 hardware encryption chip attached to most any microcontroller would be several thousand times faster and an order of magnitude cheaper than x86. x86 is for general purpose computing - this is a single purpose device.

So why did they use a raspberry pi? Probably because they already had one, or several, already knew how to use it, and could put the code together in an hour or so to demonstrate the concept and have a little fun doing it.

Comment yeah l, filament tape (fiberglass strings) strong (Score 1) 250

Rotational speed is an engineering problem, but I bet there's an easy solution. One thing that comes to mind is the difference in strength between regular plastic packing tape vs filament tape, the plastic tape with a few strings of fiberglass on it. That little bit of glass string sure makes the tape a lot stronger, and it isn't too expensive. Current disks are just plastic. Adding three cents of fiberglass should make them about ten times stronger, so they can spin much faster.

Comment Must live in a small country. 2,000 Km, 1 train (Score 1) 144

Let me guess, you live in a densely populated city, in a small country. (Where small means smaller than a US state, such as Texas.) Electric makes sense when you have many trains on relatively short tracks, so that a train passes every few minutes. US commuter systems like New York's subway benefit from being electric.

North Dakota is over 2,000 kilometers from the destination, the refineries south of Houston. Between the two locations, you'll find Dallas and a bunch of cattle. Not much else, just cattle and open plains for 2,000 Km. With nothing out there, there are no commuters, so the train goes by once per day or so. Building out thousands of kilometers of third rail for one train to use each day would be really, really silly.

Besides, it wouldn't be allowed because a green-eyed, three-toe New Mexico mosquito lizard might electrocute himself.

Comment I'd believe it if you didn't say performance & (Score 1) 247

> Java is definitely the preferred language over those for reliability, uptime, performance, security, and manageability and maintainability of the source code.

I would have believed you if you didn't say performance and security. Since you claimed Java has great performance and security I kow you're just trolling. :)

Comment most engineering is applied math (Score 1) 197

Mechanical engineering is applied math.
Therefore, if you have a math background, you're all set to be an engineer - no engineering classes required, right?

A good math background will make CS much easier. It is, however, a distinct discipline. For example, to study algorithmic complexity, some math is needed, so someone who already understands the pure math will have a head start. However, they still need to learn the patterns to quickly estimate complexity and be able to "see" which type of algorithm might have lower complexity.

In many ways, CompSci is to finite math as finite math is to arithmetic. You need arithmetic to learn all of finite math, because it's based on arithmetic, but it goes beyond arithmetic. So to CompSci requires knowledge of set theory and other finite math, but it goes beyond. See for example SQL, aka relational algebra and relational calculus. A math background will teach you about set operations, but SQL is set algebra on sets on tuples. You don't normally restrict sets of projected tuples in math class.

Comment sed, awk, grep, expr (Score 1) 197

You're not going to write much useful software in bash without calling expr, sed, awk, grep, etc. - all separate programs. When you use echo, basename, etc. you don't necessarily KNOW whether you're calling an external program or not.

On the other hand, an experienced Perl programmer rarely calls external programs. The full functionality of sed, awk, grep, basename, echo, and most other system utilities is available within the Perl language itself. The one notable thing Perl often opens a pipe to is sendmail, for configuration purposes. You could write sendmail in pure Perl. In shell, even "hello world" may well call /bin/echo . Perl is an interpreted language, shell is a scripting language.

This most certainly does not mean shell is BAD. She'll scripts are very useful. They are useful SCRIPTS.

Comment $35 unlimited everything from Boost. Phone subsidi (Score 1) 273

With the discount for on-time payments, I pay $35 for unlimited talk, text, and web on the Sprint network. That's no contract, so certainly good prices are available.

Of course, many people pay $85 for the phone subsidy that comes with a three year contract. An extra $50 / month will certainly increase the bill. $50 for 36 months is $1,800 for a "free" phone that's worth $250. No thanks. I don't recall how often you can get a new phone subsidized, but if it's a $200 credit once a year and people are paying $50 / month for that benefit ...

Comment THREE environmental studies by liberals say yes (Score 1) 144

The Obama administration recently completed the THIRD environmental impact study of the pipeline. Like the first two, it concluded that piping oil is better for the environment than what's happening now - rail cars crashing, leaking , occasionally exploding , while burning tons of diesel to power the trains.

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