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Biotech

Submission + - 3-D images of a flu virus

Roland Piquepaille writes: "Last week, The Lancet released a study stating that an influenza pandemic similar to the so-called Spanish flu pandemic that killed between 50 and 100 million people between 1918 and 1920 would kill about 62 million people today, with 96 percent of the deaths occurring in developing countries (details here, free registration required). It is reassuring to learn that researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have succeeded in imaging one of the viruses that causes influenza. So far, they've studied the H3N2 strain, but they could soon image other ones. This finding could help to discover how antibodies inactivate the virus — and maybe save millions of lives. Read more for additional references and an image of the three-dimensional structure of the H3N2 flu virus."
Communications

Managing Mail Between a Desktop and a Laptop? 134

dotancohen asks: "I'll soon be getting a new Dell laptop that'll be running Fedora Core 5 or 6. I need to access the email stored on my home box from the laptop, and also to read new email sent to me while I'm not home (and the home box is shut down). If I run an IMAP server at home, then I can't read the mail when the home box is down. However, if I pull from the POP3 server (and leave the mail on the server) then I won't be able to sort and file the mail while on the go. I currently use Kmail, but I might switch to Eudora in April/March when it becomes available for Linux. Is there anyway to sync the mail accounts between two Linux boxen, assuming that I'm using the same mail client?"
Red Hat Software

Submission + - Fedora Legacy Shutting Down

An anonymous reader writes: I can't be the only one running a crapload of Redhat 9 boxes who relies on the Fedora-Legacy project. What are we to do? In case any of you are not aware, the Fedora Legacy project is in the process of shutting down. The current model for supporting maintenance distributions is being re-examined. In the meantime, we are unable to extend support to older Fedora Core releases as we had planned. As of now, Fedora Core 4 and earlier distributions are no longer being maintained. Discussions last night on the #Fedora-Legacy channel have brought to light the fact that certain Fedora Legacy properties (servers) may be going away soon, such as the repository at and the build server. Legacy folks need to let us know what they want to be done with the content in the repository mirrors. If you don't speak up, we may find ourselves in a place where 'yum update' commands will fail in the near future for the Red Hat and Fedora Core releases that Legacy has supported in the past. If there are any issues you need to discuss regarding these events, you are welcome to discuss them on our IRC channel (channel #Fedora-Legacy on the freenode IRC network ), or on the Fedora Legacy discussion list: Sincerely, Jesse Keating and David Eisenstein of the Legacy Team. — Fedora-legacy-announce mailing list Fedora-legacy-announce@redhat.com https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/fedora-leg acy-announce
X

Submission + - Council of the EU says: We cannot support Linux

An anonymous reader writes: The Council of the EU has a streaming service to watch the meetings. But the streaming service can be only be used by Mac or MS Windows user. This is because they use wmv for the videos. In the FAQ they express a really strange opinion about this:



"The live streaming media service of the Council of the European Union can be viewed on Microsoft Windows and Macintosh platforms. We cannot support Linux in a legal way. So the answer is: No support for Linux"

An online petition has been set created to create pressure to convince the EU council to change its serve in a way that its platform independent.
Announcements

Submission + - Fedora Legacy shutting down

An anonymous reader writes: Jesse Keating and David Eisenstein of the Legacy Team sent out a notice to the fedora-legacy-announce mailing list stating that Fedora Legacy is shutting down.

"In case any of you are not aware, the Fedora Legacy project is in the process of shutting down.

The current model for supporting maintenance distributions is being re-examined. In the meantime, we are unable to extend support to older Fedora Core releases as we had planned. As of now, Fedora Core 4 and earlier distributions are no longer being maintained.

Discussions last night on the #Fedora-Legacy channel have brought to light the fact that certain Fedora Legacy properties (servers) may be going away soon, such as the repository at http://download.fedoralegacy.org/ and the build server. Legacy folks need to let us know what they want to be done with the content in the repository mirrors. If you don't speak up, we may find ourselves in a place where 'yum update' commands will fail in the near future for the Red Hat and Fedora Core releases that Legacy has supported in the past.

If there are any issues you need to discuss regarding these events, you are welcome to discuss them on our IRC channel (channel #Fedora-Legacy on the freenode IRC network http://freenode.net/), or on the Fedora Legacy discussion list: https://www.redhat.com/mailman/listinfo/fedora-leg acy-list

Sincerely,
  Jesse Keating
          and
  David Eisenstein
"
Software

Keeping Passwords Embedded In Code Secure? 130

JPyObjC Dude asks: "When designing any system that requires automated privileged access to databases or services, developers often rely on hard coding (embedding) passwords within the source code. This is obviously a bad practice as the password is then made available to anybody who has access to the source code (eg. software source control). Putting the passwords in configuration files is another practice, but it is still quite insecure as cracking hashed passwords from a text file is a trivial exercise. What do you do to manage your application passwords so that your system can run completely automated and yet make it difficult for hackers to get their hands on this precious information?"
Operating Systems

Submission + - Converting to Linux in 2007: A Success Story

Matt Simmons writes: "Converting to Linux from any platform used to be a grueling task, but I wanted to share a success story with you. A visitor to our LUG's forum was fed up with his Windows XP install, and wanted to try Linux again. Five years earlier he'd tried and found the experience excruciating. This time he decided to seek out help. We suggested Ubuntu, and you have got to see how well it worked out."
United States

Submission + - Bush admits global warming endangering polar bear

oddmuse writes: "Bush embraces the endangered polar bear — and accepts the dangers of global warming http://news.independent.co.uk/environment/article2 108212.ece "In a landmark decision, the Bush administration has concluded that global warming is endangering the existence of the polar bear — an admission that could force the US government to act to curb the emission of greenhouse gases." Al Gore's inconvenient truth is slipping past the lips of his 2000 opponent in 2006. Maybe it just takes Bush a lot longer to realise the truth of a matter than the rest of society."
Microsoft

Submission + - Vista DRM: Longest Suicide Note in History

enos writes: Peter Gutmann describes the consequences of Vista's DRM including the intentional crippling of functionality, unnecessary burdens on hardware manufacturers as well as unintended side effects. For example, Vista automatically and silently reduces the quality of audio and video on untrusted devices when "premium" content is present. This can have life threatening consequences when used in medical imaging where the compression artifacts can be misinterpreted.
Google

Google Reaches Second-Most Visited Site Status 191

Another anonymous reader has written to mention a story carried by Bloomberg, which has the news that Google is the second-most visited site on the internet. This puts it out in front of Yahoo!, which previously held the position. Google is now just behind Microsoft which, as the submitter pointed out, is the site that IE defaults to. From the article: "Visitors to Google's sites rose 9.1 percent to 475.7 million in November from a year earlier, while those to Yahoo sites rose 5.2 percent to 475.3 million, ComScore Networks Inc. said today. Both sites trail Microsoft, which had 501.7 million visitors, ComScore said. It is the first time that Mountain View, California-based Google attracted more visitors than Yahoo, reflecting Google's growing popularity outside the U.S."
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Seagate CEO: We Are Good for Porn

VE3OGG writes: "Seagate CEO Bill Watkins recently made a comment that he may be regretting for a while when he said what is probably one of the most candid statements ever, from any one, to a Fortune magazine interviewer: "Let's face it, we're not changing the world. We're building a product that helps people buy more crap — and watch porn." It was like a thousand PR people all cried out at once and then were suddenly silence."
Biotech

Submission + - Biometric Security Is Far From Foolproof

Carl Bialik from WSJ writes: "More companies are relying on biometric devices like fingerprint readers and iris scanners to identify customers and employees, but some of these security devices can be faked out with spoofs such as fake fingers made of gelatin or Play-Doh, the Wall Street Journal reports. From the article: 'Iris recognition technology, which is becoming increasingly popular because it is considered more accurate than fingerprint reading, may be more difficult to spoof. Mr. Mitchell [Ross Mitchell of International Biometric] says there have been informal reports that some scanners have been fooled by high-resolution photos of the eye.'"

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