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Comment Re:Can't turn them off? (Score 1) 152

How much battery do you really need though? Give an iPhone 20x the batteries and I bet you could record an officer's entire shift while also live-streaming the video to headquarters over the cellular network for backup, all in a package lighter than their pistol.

Yeah, that'll work. I can imagine the boys in a data center having a chuckle every time the hot policewomen goes to the toilet.

I think they should have every right to turn off their cameras, nobody should be constantly recorded.

OTOH they should expect a full investigation if they do it when they're in action or interacting with the public.

Comment Re:Can't turn them off? (Score 1) 152

No, I think the issue is "if only such obvious solutions were actually *implemented*", which is something we'll have to force down their throats, because they certainly aren't going to volunteer to give up their ability to be huge bullies.

I'm pretty sure the "huge bullies" in the police force are in the minority (certainly less than half).

This could help weed them out if implemented.

Comment Re:Can't turn them off? (Score 1) 152

That depends on how easy it is to turn them on.

It doesn't have to be a fiddly little switch, it can be a great big button. Officers who use it every day will soon get used to hitting it whenever they go into action.

You could even automate it - turn them on if there's a loud sound, use an accelerometer to detect when and officer starts running/fighting, etc.

Obviously the "off" switch is a fiddly little button...

Comment What long term? Around here that means three weeks (Score 1) 589

It certainly is true that many people have a nodding acquaintance with Microsoft products - although surprisingly few have mastered, say, 10% of their features. (Largely because so many of those features were added only so as to win tick-in-the-box sales contests). So, in the short term, there is some advantage in continuing with them. Just as there is some advantage in never training staff, just hoping to hire people with existing experience.

In the medium term, let alone the long term, such policies are very risky. The changes in UI between consecutive releases of Microsoft Office can be greater than those between an earlier version and an open-source alternative. As we have seen, many people baulked at the huge difference in UI between Windows 7 and Windows 8. And of course, if no one ever trains staff, eventually there will not be enough people with the necessary experience to go round.

Unfortunately our implementation of capitalism encourages extreme short-termism. Why not slash and burn while you are in a given job, as long as you can be fairly sure of getting promoted before the harm is noticed? Better still, your successor will look really bad, thus improving your image (relatively). And of course, if you accept the principle of never adopting any software that everyone isn't familiar with, by and by you will find that all your software is obsolete. As is your staff's experience.

Comment Re:Oh goody (Score 1) 264

Now you can pay $4000 for a drive that won't last 2 years! Yeah.. sign me up.

With capacity like this they could put in a RAID0 option which halves the capacity but increases the reliability by orders of magnitude. If corruption is detected you can grab the shadow copy, remap it somewhere else, mark the block as bad. The chances of two blocks failing at the exact same time is insignificant.

Comment Re:Sure we could. (Score 4, Insightful) 272

...and this gets modded "Insightful".

I know Slashdot is popular with a lot of folks with "a zany sense of humour". But suggesting the nuclear bombing of Moscow - or anywhere else - is not clever and it's not funny. It's wicked, and I say that with no religious agenda. If the word "wicked" has any meaning, this is a perfect example of it.

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