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Comment Re:The One True RICH Ron Paul (Score 3, Informative) 611

Uh, no, it's not banned. The only thing it can't contain are the lungs (or lights), since they are extremely perishable.
Lungs are a no-no

Haggis vendor 1
Haggis vendor 2
Haggis vendor we use for our Burn's Night
Canned haggis (it's not bad, but it ain't traditional)
Lungless, low-fat haggis (ick!)

Comment Re:PWM on LED brake lights drives me nuts (Score 1) 417

Wait, if they're already blasting it full on, why are they using PWM at all?
I was going to use a TLC5940...

There's part of your answer - they use PWM controllers because they can be controlled via a serial interface and they don't require a resistor per segment. The actual PWM part is a bonus. You've seen the 'throbby' turn signals, right?

Comment Re:PWM on LED brake lights drives me nuts (Score 1) 417

A cap would work, but they're notoriously unreliable in high heat/extreme conditions, they're expensive, bulky, and it would have to be a fairly large cap to provide a slow enough rise time at typical LED currents. The other downside is that the cap would likely also result in an equally long fall time. Depending on the circuit (assuming no constant-current source) the inrush currents could be fairly high (a discharged cap is like a short circuit until it charges).

A better solution would be to modify the existing PWM code (as the parent poster mentions) to ramp the brightness up instead of blasting it full-on. This is done in switching supplies to provide what's called 'soft start'. Here's an example using a Microchip embedded processor.

Comment Re:Related: White LEDs (Score 1) 417

Not to mention, traffic lights.

Maybe it's just my old eyes, but I find the wicked-fast 'rise time' of LEDs in traffic lights and auto stoplights startling. To me it's actually a distraction to be startled every time someone hits their brakes. I'll probably get used to it as they become more prevalent.

Comment Re:Cool... (Score 1) 178

What about the HAM radio guys who put their callsigns on their plates? Oh noes, they have a hobby and used a plate instead of a less readable bumper sticker. What a sense of entitlement they must have.

At least in Virginia you must have an amateur radio license (duh) and amateur radio equipment installed in your car to qualify for a ham plate. The rationale is that if a police officer needs comms, they can rely on anyone with a ham plate. After all, the first purpose of amateur radio existing (as codified in Title 47, Part 97.1a):

"Recognition and enhancement of the value of the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications. "

Comment Re:Moulder was right (Score 1) 117

According to Wikipedia, the US interest in bioweapons started around 1918.

An interesting coincidence given that the world has just been subjected to the deadliest viral pandemic in history, no?

It killed between 50 and 100 million people - 3% to 6% of the world's population at that time.

If that happened today, it would kill the equivalent of every living soul in the United States and Mexico. Sobering, huh?

Comment Re:Yeah, but how to get sleep (Score 1) 180

I made the Darth Vader comment - it's from the air leaving the little exit hole on the mask. Trying to talk with the CPAP on makes you sound more like Zuul (at 00:13), not Vader.

Re: the fan ramp-up sound - I think what you might be hearing is the fan returning to normal speed after slowing when you exhale. All of the CPAPs I've used with that option have a setting to turn that off. I prefer no initial pressure ramp-up and no pressure release when I exhale (it makes the mask stay in place better).

If the noise still bothers you, you can try putting the machine on the floor or under the bed. You can also use those foam in-ear earplugs.

Good luck!

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