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Piracy

Submission + - Torrent - Where There's a Will...

__aamdvq1432 writes: Peer-to-peer bit torrent client, Tribler, promises to sustain the file-sharing universe even if the current tracker-based model dies. According to Ernesto over at TorrentFreak, Tribler Makes BitTorrent Impossible to Shut Down as long as the Internet is up. The rub that gets a little glossed over in the article is the issue of unmoderated peer trust. The authors of Tribler at Delft University of Technology claim that crowdsourcing will keep the process safe. That is, users will rate sources and share those ratings with peers. If I was a Windoze user, I don't know that I'd want to be an early wader in any new stream based on that security model. Malware ahoy!
The Almighty Buck

Submission + - U.S. Air Force Buys iPads to Replace Flight Bags (ibtimes.com)

redletterdave writes: "Following the precedent set by commercial airliners in December, the U.S. Air Forceplans to buyup to 18,000 iPads for its Air Mobility Command (AMC), replacing heavy flight bags with light and efficient Apple iPad 2s for the crews that fly cargo aircrafts. The devices will reportedly be used by the crews on the C-5 Galaxy and C-17 Globemaster aircrafts. There are several benefits to using electronic flight bags instead of physical versions. For one, the iPad can instantly update charts electronically, while the AMC would require flying charts get reprinted every 28 days to stay up-to-date. By cutting publication printing and distribution costs, and exchanging 70 pounds of paper for a 1.3-pound iPad, the Air Force can save some serious cash, including more than $1.2 million worth of fuel per year."

Submission + - Selling Used MP3s Found Legal In America (activepolitic.com) 1

bs0d3 writes: After some litigation; ReDigi, a site where people can sell used MP3's has been found legal in America. One of the key decisions the judge had to make was whether MP3's were material objects or not. 'Material objects' are not subject to the distribution right stipulated in "17 USC 106(3)" which protects the sale of intellectual property copies. If MP3's are material objects than the resale of them is guaranteed legal under the first sale' exception in 17 USC 109. Capitol Records tried
to argue that they were material objects under one law and not under the other. Today the judge has sided with the first-sale doctrine, which means he is seeing these as material objects.

Government

Submission + - Surveillance Drones over U.S. get OK by Congress (washingtontimes.com)

suraj.sun writes: Look! Up in the sky! Is it a bird? Is it a plane? It’s a drone, and it’s watching you. That’s what privacy advocates fear from a bill Congress passed this week to make it easier for the government to fly unmanned spy planes in U.S. airspace.

The FAA Reauthorization Act, which President Obama is expected to sign, also orders the Federal Aviation Administration to develop regulations for the testing and licensing of commercial drones by 2015.

Privacy advocates say the measure will lead to widespread use of drones for electronic surveillance by police agencies across the country and eventually by private companies as well.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/feb/7/coming-to-a-sky-near-you/

Submission + - where are the open source jobs? 2

stry_cat writes: My company has bought into the FUD and is going 100% Microsoft. Rather than work in this environment and be continuously at odds with upper management, I have decided to seek employment elsewhere.

Where do I look for an open source job? I've started with the local paper's Sunday classifieds. I've looked on dice.com and monster.com. However almost all are Microsoft related. The few that aren't are some sort of dinky contract or temp job. So is there a place to find a job in an open source environment?

Submission + - Smart Camera Tells Tobacco from Marijuana (smartertechnology.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A new smart camera technology not only takes a picture but also assays chemical composition, allowing photographers to tell whether that hand-rolled cigarette contains tobacco or marijuana. Designed to speed industrial inspection systems--such as detecting whether food is spoiled--the new smart camera includes spectral filters that make images of corn fields appear differently from hemp. Spectral cameras have been available for decades, but this microchip version should be cheap enough for almost any application--including law enforcement.
The Matrix

Submission + - Cyborg cockroaches turned into fuel cells (discovery.com)

wdef writes: From TFA:

A team at Case Western Reserve University led by Michelle Rasmussen and Daniel Scherson has tapped into the metabolic system of a cockroach to produce electricity. This isn't the first time anyone has tried building a cyborg bug of sorts. A University of Michigan team tried it using piezoelectric materials. What's interesting here is that Rasmussen's group used the insect's own body chemistry to produce electricity.

The article also says shiitake mushrooms contain the same sugar as cockroaches and have also been used to produce electricity. Hopefully mushrooms and roaches alike will be able to exit the Matrix at some point.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Democracy in the Digital Age

There is an inherit problem with democracy. Two wolves and a sheep voting on whats for dinner, inevitably leaves the sheep in a continual state of wanting. However the distribution means of information this characteristic of majority rule will be prevalent in any democratic society. Most obviously the cure is the American solution of representative democracy. This leads to other inherit problems. 5 wolves voting on what to eat for 100 sheep. What is the place of Democracy in the Digital/Infor

Comment In other news... (Score 1) 91

a new study came out that showed game enthusiasts read their iPad/Smart phone while visiting the throne room instead of a magazine or newspaper. This trend of ditching the traditional throne reading median has been gradual but appears to be all inclusive now.

Comment Re:No, it would not work (Score 3, Interesting) 594

Not a clue, and I'm happy to be quiet on such a topic. Unfortunately, many people in the same situation would not, and I dread to think what would happen if we listened to all of them. The number of people who know something about an esoteric subject is usually outnumbered by the number of people willing to interfere in things they know nothing about.

If maybe there were a way to determine your level of expertise on various subjects that either qualify or disqualify you from voting on certain matters. Such that, in regards to interstate grazing rights you would forfeit your vote to the people that have been determined to know precedents, rulings, rights, and other determining factors for such policy. However, say a policy of voting ethics, you would be able to cast your vote with other eligible voters that have passed pre-screening for voting on that matter. There by leaving the decisions to the people that know the ins-n-outs of the issue at hands.

I guess the trick would be to determine qualifications for voting on particular matters. If you had to answer questions about your depth of knowledge on the particular subject it would make the time to vote for A or B much more time consuming than just click-scribble-done. Which may or may not be a bad thing.

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