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Comment Re:Why wouldn't they charge for tethering? (Score 1) 326

"Because it is no different surfing the net with the iphone displaying the data or your laptop displaying the data."

I'm not sure I fully agree with that statement. Your behaviour is likely to differ between iPhone usage and what you do on your laptop. e.g. on your laptop you're more likely to exchange large documents via e-mail, download Windows updates, etc.

There will be some concept of what an "average" user does and their current tariffs will be priced accordingly. Changing the device being used is likely to change the assumptions.

Controversial suggestion: maybe what you want is a capped usage tariff that can be shared between iPhone and tethered devices, rather the current "all you can eat"....

Mozilla

Submission + - Firefox keeps winning terrain in Europe

PARENA writes: "French researcher Xiti claims that Mozilla Firefox keeps winning terrain in Europe. Almost 25% of internet users in Europe uses Firefox. Slovenia (44.5%), Finland (41.3%), Croatia (36.5%) and Germany (36.2%) lead the way, followed by a group of mostly Eastern European countries. Remarkably, The Netherlands is only at 13.3%, right before Andorra. The rest of the world (except Oceania) is behind Europe, with 11.9% to 15.1%."
Patents

Submission + - Vonage Admits no Workaround for Verizon Patents

Frosty Piss writes: "USA Today is reporting that Vonage has finally confirmed what many suspected: The company has no "workaround" to sidestep Verizon's VOIP patents. Moreover, Vonage isn't sure that such a plan is even feasible, given the expansiveness of Verizon's patents, which set out methods for passing calls between the Internet and conventional phone networks. Vonage has seen its shares plunge more than 80% since it went public last year. This year alone, its shares are down more than 45%. Is this the end for Vonage? How will this effect other VOIP providers?"
Security

Submission + - Tor Open to Attack

An anonymous reader writes: A group of researchers have written a paper that lays out an attacks against Tor, in enough detail to cause Roger Dingledine a fair amount of heartburn. The essential attacks are: Tor doesn't verify claims of uptime or bandwidth, allowing an attacker to advertise more than it need deliver, and thus draw traffic. If the attacker controls the entry and exit node and has decent clocks, then the attacker can link these together and trace someone through the network. Yowza!

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