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Iphone

Submission + - But there's an app for that!

pcwhalen writes: "You can't swing a cat anymore without hitting somebody and their iPad. iPads, iPhones and all other manner of tablet PCs are everywhere. App developers code furiously to deliver apps for media giants and retailers to deliver content, products and services. But slow down, kids. ReadWriteWeb looks at a survey showing that of mobile users "eighty-seven percent prefer to use websites and mobile sites" over dedicated apps.

[ http://rww.to/zF7a4t ]

HTML it is then."
Censorship

Submission + - SOPA was not worst threat to web rights (itworld.com)

DillyTonto writes: Getting Congress to shelve SOPA was a big win, but also an anomaly in environment in which individual rights of speech and privacy are denigrated by far more direct intrusions. Taps recording Internet activity, cell-phone account records, Internet histories, financial data, personal associations are all available to commercial and government agencies citing largely unconstitutional new rules. Score 1 for SOPA opponents, but censors and snoops still have a commanding lead.
Hardware

Submission + - New Silver Ink Leads to Cheaper Flexible Electroni (illinois.edu)

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a new method of printing silver ink that could lead to dramatic decrease in the price of flexible electronics. Previous conductive silver inks used in electronics had to be printed at very high temperatures, mandating that the plastics they were printed on be able to hold up under the heat — which increased the cost of materials. The new ink lowers the energy usage needed during the process and it can be printed at 194 degrees Fahrenheit, so lower-cost, flexible plastics can be used as a base.
Science

Submission + - BodyWave Lets You Mind-control a PC, Without a Hea (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: A bio-feedback armband called BodyWave is the first of its kind to measure brainwave activity through the body, not the scalp. Instead of an EEG headset recording a user's concentration level, the Bodywave reads brainwaves at the arm by measuring the electric current given off by neurons firing in the brain. Bundled with an interactive software package called Play Attention, it reportedly enables interactive feedback and training towards peak mental performance. Apart from the obvious potential in sport, its ability to train attention and teach stress-control in mobile situations (much less obtrusively than wearing a headset) opens up wider potential. It has already found applications in education, industry and the military as well as in improving the lives of people with disabilities like Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).
Intel

Submission + - Intel WiFi syncs with dial-up modem sounds (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "A new patent from Intel hints that we might not have heard our last bleepchzzztdoingboingboing. The patent, called 'Audible authentication for wireless network enrollment,' outlines a system that uses coded bleeps, clicks, or even music to pair wireless devices. In essence, your TV would output a secret key in audible tones, and your wireless router would pick it up and grant access to the network. The obvious use case for this is keyboardless devices such as media streamers, or screenless smart devices like fridges, thermostats, and so on."
Intel

Submission + - Intel's Quad-Core Sandy Bridge-E Tested (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: "When Intel launched their high-end Sandy Bridge-E platform recently, the company also quietly launched a new midrange quad-core. The new Core i7-3820 is based on the very same die as the higher-end Core i7-3960X, but two more of its cores and some cache have been disabled. Whereas the Core i7-3960X has six active cores (eight total, two disabled) and 15MB of shared SmartCache, the Core i7-3820 has four active cores (8 threads with Intel HyperThreading) and 10MB of shared cache. Unfortunately the new chip doesn't offer much in the way of a performance boost over the previous generation Core i7-2700K, but it does offer more integrated PCI Express connectivity (Gen 3.0 compatible eventually once validated by Intel), more memory bandwidth (quad-channel vs. dual-channel), more on-chip cache, and it's paired to Intel's latest X79 chipset."

Comment Public education (Score 4, Interesting) 214

Public schools always cater to the lowest common denominator. They are more a tool for socialization than education, readying a workforce for a life of 9 to 5 conformity. I don't recall innovative thought being rewarded in school. Memorization, maybe.

Thus, the movement for home schooling. [http://www.nationalhomeschool.com/socialization.asp]

Most teachers don't want or have time to teach each child as an individual. It's not their fault. Grading and assessment alone would overwhelm them. Finding the material to challenge each student's ability individually would be impossible with given resources and mindset.

It is a tribute to our children's tenacity that so many succeed despite the public school system.

Comment Congress Is the Best Party to Police the Internet (Score 4, Interesting) 100

Because they understand it so well.

Take a look at "Dear Congress, It's No Longer OK To Not Know How The Internet Works" http://bit.ly/vOEEbt

Senator Ted Stevens described the internet as “a series of tubes;” Rep. Mel Watt of North Carolina "seemed particularly comfortable about his own lack of understanding;" and Rep. Maxine Waters of California stated "any discussion of security concerns is 'wasting time' and that the bill should move forward without question."

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