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Comment Re:Always looking for passionate programmers (Score 1) 533

Most of it is personal to me, but in all honesty the ATA driver is rather funky: a ring 0 multi-threaded driver. If you ignore the completely insane stuff for handling various horrifically broken ATA hardware implementations, then the actual implementation itself is rather elegant.

I also wrote a rather interesting multi-stage asynchronous media pipeline that emulated Java/C# interfaces in C++, but that never made it past the prototype stage.

Comment Re:Always looking for passionate programmers (Score 1) 533

I love writing code and working on hard problems, but do I feel like working on them for 80 hours a week, every week? No, I enjoy having a life outside of work and a separation of work and home life is necessary.

So much this. I enjoy solving difficult problems, but I also enjoy a not using a computer.

Nor do I currently have any active open source projects on my Github account; because you know, I spent over ten years working on Syllable and frankly that was more than most people do in a lifetime, so I'm O.K with that.

Happily the sorts of companies I work for are O.K with that too, and prefer to judge me on my experience and work I produce professionally, rather than an irrelevant body of work that I produced in my spare time.

Comment Not the only thing to worry about (Score 1) 155

from wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T...

In 600 million years

The Sun's increasing luminosity begins to disrupt the carbonate–silicate cycle; higher luminosity increases weathering of surface rocks, which traps carbon dioxide in the ground as carbonate. As water evaporates from the Earth's surface, rocks harden, causing plate tectonics to slow and eventually stop. Without volcanoes to recycle carbon into the Earth's atmosphere, carbon dioxide levels begin to fall.[30] By this time, they will fall to the point at which C3 photosynthesis is no longer possible. All plants that utilize C3 photosynthesis (~99 percent of present-day species) will die.[31]

in 800 Million years

Carbon dioxide levels fall to the point at which C4 photosynthesis is no longer possible.[31] Multicellular life dies out.[32]

I not that this would be rather inconvenient

Comment Re:MOS? (Score 1) 37

You could do this using FRS walkie talkies, as long as they have microphone and earphone connections. Or analog telephones. It's been tested multiple times on ham FM walkie talkies. Anything that carries voice should work. The bandwidth is only 1.25 kHz and I think the low end starts at about 700 Hz.

Comment Re:MOS? (Score 1) 37

There is a video of the codec vs. SSB on the same radio link here. You can also take any radio links you have at hand and run the FreeDV program. This is an evening project to set up without a business case, and at least some companies appreciate people who take the initiative to do this sort of thing.

Comment Re:1200 bits/s, not bauds. (Score 1) 37

Sorry. When I say "1200 Baud", I am in general thinking of the TAPR TNC 2, which was never built for voice but can do it, to a degree, with this codec. It's sort of a Bell 212 modem on half-duplex radio. There were many commercial products based on the TNC 2 design and many hams have them on hand. It's a good demo to put speech through a pair of them, not really practical because the latency is high.

Comment Re:MOS? (Score 1) 37

MOS is only for people who want to pay a lot of money. Of the automated processes, the one available to us isn't validated for less than 4K bps codecs.

It would be a great improvement to MOS if there was an open version of POQLA. But the actual customer base for the codec have never even heard of MOS and thus we aren't volunteering to write that. The folks who want to put it in expensive government support systems yet aren't willing to help with testing don't get our sympathy.

Comment Re:Code2 voice sample @4:50 (Score 1) 37

We avoid some techniques that would make the noise performance worse. The HF version of the codec doesn't vector quantitize, and doesn't do any delta coding between frames. The current FEC is Golay and we are investigating low-density parity codes.

There is a lot yet unheard about the Ratheon codec, regarding its actual noise performance and how well the listener can distinguish different speakers.

Submission + - Three Videos on Codec2 and Open Hardware

Bruce Perens writes: Codec2 is the Open Source ultra-low-bandwidth speech codec capable of encoding voice in 1200 Baud. FreeDV (freedv .org) is an HF (global-range radio) implementation that uses half the bandwidth of SSB, and without the noise. Here are three speeches about where it's going:
  • David Rowe: Embedding Codec2: Open Source speech coding on a low-cost microprocessor, at Linux.conf.au 2014. YouTube, downloadable MP4.
  • Bruce Perens: FreeDV, Codec2, and HT of the Future (how we're building a software-defined walkie-talkie that's smarter than a smartphone), at the TAPR/ARRL Digital Communications Conference 2013. Blip.tv, YouTube
  • Chris Testa on the .Whitebox handheld software-defined radio design that is the RF portion of HT of the Future, which was also shown at the TAPR conference.

Submission + - How Weather Influences Global Warming Opinions

An anonymous reader writes: Last week's polar vortex weather event wasn't only hard on fingers, toes and heating bills. It also overpowered the ability of most people to make sound judgments about climate change, in the same way that heat waves do, according to a new study published in the Jan. 11 issue of the journal Nature Climate Change. Researchers have known for some time that the acceptance of climate change depends on the day most people are asked. During unusually hot weather, people tend to accept global warming, and they swing against it during cold events.

Submission + - Seismic firm sues (former) customers over regulators' releasing data (leaderpost.com)

innocent_white_lamb writes: Geophysical Service Inc. maps the ocean floor and then licenses that data to oil drilling companies. However, they are required to submit their data to various regulatory agencies in order to get a permit to do the mapping. Its customers can then get the data from those agencies for free. Therefore, Geophysical Services Inc. has sold its ships and hasn't booked any revenue at all since 2009.

Instead of doing any mapping, they now spend 95% of their time suing government departments, regulatory agencies and their former customers. "I do this 10 hours a day," said chief operating officer Paul Einarsson. "This is all I do."

The regulators argue that the data is not protected by copyright, that the data is not an "original work", and that their release of the data is in the public interest.

GSI uses Access to Information requests to find out if their data has been released to other parties, and then file lawsuits against those other parties.

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