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Apple

Submission + - Victory for Apple in "the Patent Trial of the Century" (wired.com) 2

pdabbadabba writes: The jury is in in the epic patent dispute between Apple and Samsung and Apple appears to be coming out on top. The court is still going through the 700+ items on the verdict form, but things seem to be going Apple's way so far. In the case of Apple's various UI patents, the jury is consistently ruling that Samsung not only violated Apple's patent, but did so willfully.

Comment Re:2007 Mac Mini couldn't be upgraded (Score 1) 397

Even some 64-bit EFI machines won't run it, because they have Intel graphics. Anything with the 965 series (such as X3100) is unsupported for one reason - there was never a 64-bit kext for it. This is also what kept these machines from booting a 64-bit kernel in 10.7. So if Apple and/or Intel would actually create a 64-bit kext for the 965 series, a whole bunch more machines would run it just fine.

FWIW, this might also get your Mini up and running, as there are definitely ways to get around the 32-bit EFI problem. But until they create that kext (read: never), it's not gonna happen.

Android

Dell and Baidu Introduce a Smartphone With Forked Version of Android 146

cortex writes "XDA developers is reporting on the release of a new smart phone which runs a forked version of Google's Android operating system: 'Dell and Baidu, the Chinese search giant with over 80% marketshare in its home-country, unveiled the Streak Pro on Tuesday (via Computerworld). The device has a 4.3 AMOLED screen with 960×540 resolution and packs a 1.5 GHz dual-core Qualcomm processor. Most notably, however, is the operating system it runs: a forked Android version dubbed Baidu Yi, which replaces Google's services with those of Baidu.' How will this impact Google's support for Android and open source in general?'
Android

Galaxy S and Galaxy Tab Won't Get Android 4.0 333

bonch writes "Samsung has announced that the Galaxy S smartphone, which sold 10 million last year, and the Galaxy Tab tablet won't be receiving the Android 4.0 update, known as 'Ice Cream Sandwich.' Samsung claims the devices lack enough RAM and ROM to run Android 4.0 alongside TouchWiz and other custom 'experience-enhancing' software. Note that the Galaxy S runs the same hardware as the Nexus S, which is already receiving the Android 4.0 update."
Sony

Sony Sued Over PSN 'No Suing' Provision 384

An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from the Examiner: "In a grand dose of irony today, Sony was sued over a term in the PlayStation Network's End User Agreement that states that users cannot sue Sony. These terms were added in September, after a long string of Sony hacks (the official count is that Sony got broken into 17 times in a space of about 2 months), which included a massive outage of the PlayStation Network itself. The suit that was filed today is a class action suit for all of those who bought a PS3 and signed up for the PSN before the September update to the EULA. The suit also claims that this is a unfair Business practice on Sony's part, and requires users to forgo their rights in order to use the device that they purchased."
Image

IT Worker's Revenge Lands Her In Jail Screenshot-sm 347

aesoteric writes "A 30-year-old IT worker at a Florida-based health centre was this week sentenced to 19 months in a US federal prison for hacking, and then locking, her former employer's IT systems. Four days after being fired from the Suncoast Community Health Centers' for insubordination, Patricia Marie Fowler exacter her revenge by hacking the centre's systems, deleting files, changing passwords, removing access to infrastructure systems, and tampering with pay and accrued leave rates of staff."
Microsoft

Ray Ozzie To Step Down From His Role At Microsoft 229

denobug writes "Ray Ozzie, Chief Software Architect at Microsoft, is stepping down. He is to remain with Microsoft until he retires, focusing his efforts 'in the broader area of entertainment where Microsoft has many ongoing investments,' based on a memo from Steve Ballmer. Also according to Steve's memo, the role of CSA was unique and it will not be filled."
Hardware Hacking

The Hackintosh Guide 453

An anonymous reader writes "A 'Hackintosh' is a computer that runs Apple's OS X operating system on non-Apple hardware. This has been possible since Apple's switch from IBM's PowerPC processors to Intel processors a few years ago. Until recently, building a PC-based Mac was something done only by hard-core hackers and technophiles, but in the last few months, building a Hackintosh PC has become much easier. Benchmark Reviews looks at what it's possible to do with PC hardware and the Mac Snow Leopard OS today, and the pros and cons of building a Hackintosh computer system over purchasing a supported Apple Mac Pro."

Comment Re:Why not just use Pinyin? (Score 1) 508

It can be tougher to learn, but like any other language it wholly depends on your exposure to it. I'd say the biggest problem Latin-based speakers will have at first is learning the differences between intiial, medial, and final forms of each glyph. Then, learning the differences between those within the Arabic-like languages -- Farsi, Dari, etc. To be able to accomplish basic recognition, I would say no more than 3 months should be plenty. But that's true of most languages -- getting basic comprehension typically takes a short time, but mastery can often be a lifetime endeavor.

Comment Re:Not that surprising. (Score 1) 301

Geez, that UET is particularly nasty in its side-effects.

We have emissions to thank for a lot of the computerization of cars. Everything you described, as you know, comes down to the computer retarding the engine timing. This is done solely to keep the vehicle from spewing emissions, or at least the computer is programmed to *think* that's what the car is about to do and it reacts accordingly. I notice you'll get similar behavior with a bad mass airflow sensor, sometimes inefficient cat but that ties into O2, etc.

I'm with you -- lose all the sensors, let's go back to pure mechanical.

Comment Re:Not that surprising. (Score 1) 301

While it is true that you cannot just drop in a used BCM plug-n-play style, (with the same feature/option codes) you can typically use a 30-minute procedure to reset the ignition and other systems. The sucky thing is the procedure can vary depending on the age of the BCM, but it's still workable.

That will at least get a matching-option-code BCM to work in a different vehicle, except the radio. As far as I know, GM is the only party able to unlock a locked radio. Part of me wonders if, with reverse engineering, it would be possible to crash the BCM CPU and force the radio back to unlocked.

What is unclear to me is, what does the GM tool actually do? Everything technical I've read about Passkey implies that the key is write-once, but the GM dealers seem to have a way to clear that key. If it truly *can* be erased electronically, couldn't a strong EM signal at least corrupt, if not wipe, the BCM PROMs?

Comment Re:Not that surprising. (Score 4, Informative) 301

Three words -- Body Control Module. I don't know a damned thing about Jaguars, but with GM vehicles in general they all have a Body Control Module installed. Anything that isn't directly related to the powertrain is controlled by the BCM (incidentally, the powertrain is controlled by the Powertrain Control Module). In many GM vehicles, the BCM can be communicated with via the radio; this is to set certain user options like how long the headlamps will remain illuminated after exiting the vehicle. In the event that something goes wrong with the BCM, the radio will lock because it gets put into an anti-theft state, and typically the car will not start. All because a single capacitor on a shitty little Motorola board got cooked, for example.

Then, even if you get a used BCM with the same option codes as the one you're replacing, the radio will remain in an anti-theft state because the thinking of the designers (I guess) was that people would start swapping BCMs just to steal radios -- dumb.

GM, of course, has a tool to reprogram BCMs, but even they say there's a 50/50 shot their programming will render the BCM unusable. From my limited research of the boards they use, it seems there is little if any CRC done in any shape or form, so it sounds like the board will happily write bad or invalid data to the PROM.

Again, I don't know how a Jaguar design works, but there are vehicles where the radio does indeed affect other parts of the vehicle, much to the dismay of owners and dealers alike.

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