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Comment Re:why? (Score 1) 778

Are there still security issues with having JS enabled?

There are security issues ANYTIME you let someone run code on your machine. Javascript is code. Therefore, yes, there are "still" (and always will be) security issues with having JS enabled.

Yes, sometimes -- very, very rarely, about 1-5% as often as clueless developers obsessed with shiny things think -- Javascript is needed for functionality. But if you can't make your site safe to access with JS turned off, you fail.

And of course this changes nothing. Folks don't turn off JS entirely these day, they use Noscript.

Comment Re:How is this legal? (Score 1) 1103

If those programs didn't exist, people wouldn't even work at Wal-Mart because it wouldn't pay the bills, and when you don't have employees it's awfully hard to have a business.

Nope. If those programs didn't exist, people would still work at Wal-Mart because Wal-Mart destroyed other local employers, leaving them little alternative.

it all boils down to government being the problem, as usual.

Only if you understand that Wal-Mart, like all corporations (indeed, all "property", as we know it) is a creation of a government.

Comment Re:I go to a fair amount of movies (Score 1) 924

Years ago, I tried wearing a wristwatch, but I found it gets in the way. It makes typing uncomfortable for me

Agreed, wrist watches are uncomfortable. For everyday carry, I have a clip watch clipped to a beltloop. It's far easier to check the time there than to dig my phone out of a pocket, plus I have also clipped a keychain-style LED flashlight to it. It's occasionally useful just to have a light-duty carabiner at hand. And I'll take it running or biking, when I usually leave my bulkier cell phone home.

For fancy dress, have some real style and get a pocket watch.

Comment Re:Would you ride in one? (Score 4, Insightful) 205

Yes, the initial costs were high, but most of the costs you cite are reaction costs. How much did a week of grounding all airlines cost? How much does additional TSA infrastructure cost? How mush of that $1.4 trillion lost stock valuation was real vs just numbers in a computer, and how much of that was due to panic reaction?

As the grandparent pointed out, if we'd reacted with the attitude "shit happens, deal with it" (as was, for example, the attitude in Britain after the first few days of the Blitz), that final cost would have been far smaller; still 3000 lives, but probably less than $0.01 trillion dollars.

As OP alluded to, bee stings don't kill people, the anaphylactic shock reaction does.

Comment Re:Just how would you explain the risks? (Score 1) 168

Overall, the vaccines are saver.

It depends on the vaccine, the disease and the patient.

The seasonal flu vaccine is pretty useless in healthy people, can have significant to serous side effect, and probably is not worth the risk in the general population. OTOH vaccines for polio, measles, and whooping cough are certainly safer for most folks than going unvaccinated.

Comment Re:Data curation? (Score 2) 82

All this does is get the public to curate their own data that is being mined. Instead, the FTC should allow you to intentionally corrupt the data.

This.

In fact, it's perfectly legal (or at least, it used to be; who knows these days) to give false information or a false name as long as you're not trying to commit fraud. (Or impede justice; don't lie to the cops, just remain silent.)

Comment Re:So much for... (Score 1) 743

In the USA, driving privileges are rarely revoked permanently.

It's a consequence of our public policy about development and mass transit. It is practically impossible for most of the population to remain gainfully employed without driving "privileges". We can tighten driving laws when and only when we improve mass transit and reduce sprawl.

Comment Re:So much for... (Score 1) 743

Why? Shouldn't everyone be able to exercise freedom of thought and speech as long as they don't commit any actual crimes?

Making a threat is an actual crime.

In some contexts, a public statement that "I'm going to do X!" is a threat. In others, it's not. To determine that context, you have to investigate.

Submission + - Why is the IRS targeting free software? (oreilly.com)

wiredog writes: From the IRS "be on the lookout" list that listed "Tea Party", among others, as suspicious entities:

Open Source Software
These organizations are requesting either 501(c)(3) or 501(c)(6) exemption in order to collaboratively develop new software. The members of these organizations are usually the for-profit business or for-profit support technicians of the software.


Comment Re:Open Source is similar to the Tea Party ... (Score 1) 356

The birth control issue is about government forcing employers to pay for their employees' birth control.

No, it's about government forcing employers to pay for their employees' health insurance. Whether the employee uses that insurance to cover birth control or treatment for the clap or hemorrhoid surgery or a flu shot is none of the employer's fsck business.

The option, of course, would be to not have employers to pay for their employees' health insurance, and go to a rational "Medicare for all" system, but no one is willing to face the corporate monster that for-profit health care has created.

All the libertarians I know adopt the attitude "Leave me the hell alone". They don't want to be "given" anything. Just the right to keep the fruits of their own labor.

In the original sense, where libertarian == anarchist, that's true. But in the American sense, after capitalists hijacked the term and founded the so-called "Libertarian Party", we have a "Libertarianism" that wants to keep the fruits of other people's labor. That is, after all, the essence of capitalism: wealth for the owners of capital, a pittance for those who do the labor. Show me an American Libertarian who wants to tear up all government-issued land deeds, resource deeds, corporate charters, copyrights and patents: all the ways the investment class accumulates wealth without labor.

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