Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Windows

Submission + - Windows XP driver support begins to end (blorge.com) 3

thefickler writes: "It's official, manufacturers are starting to dump Windows XP support entirely and some new models won't even have Windows XP drivers or any kind of support available, anywhere. One reader, "Mark" contacted TECH.BLORGE regarding installing Windows XP on his HP V6610 (Australian) laptop which is the V6620 in the US. "Mark" said when he went to the HP driver/downloads section that very few Windows XP drivers were available for it and he was right, there were almost no useful drivers for the laptop there. His call to HP support didn't get very far as "HP is no longer supporting Windows XP on the newer PCs.""
Education

Submission + - 'More sex needed' to boost sperm (fun-on.com)

tapiros writes: "Some men should have sex every day to maximise the chances of getting their partner pregnant, researchers say. It is known for couples with fertility problems to abstain from sex for several days to boost sperm numbers before trying to conceive. However, the Sydney University team, addressing the American Society for Reproductive Medicine conference, said this could mean poorer quality sperm. One UK expert said daily sex might be better for men with damaged sperm. The Australian scientists studied 42 men whose sperm had been found to be an abnormal shape when examined under the microscope. They were told to ejaculate daily for seven days, and these samples were compared with those taken from them after three days' abstinence. All but five of the men had less sperm damage in their daily samples compared with the post-abstention sample. Fertility myth Dr Allan Pacey, the secretary of the British Fertility Society, said that while not having sex allowed the numbers of sperm to build up, there was a "trade-off" between quality and quantity. "This research shows that when you put people on a daily ejaculation regime, it reduces the figure for DNA damage. "If you can go from 30% to 20% that is quite a big shift and that should have some implications for fertility. "There are men out there who think, or whose partners think, that limiting ejaculation will make them more fertile. "I remember one couple in which the woman would only let the man ejaculate when she was in her fertile period, so the poor chap was going without for almost a month at a time." that if a couple was initially trying to get pregnant, an interval of two to three days was probably advisable — whereas a man with high DNA damage and a "decent" sperm count should try more often."
Operating Systems

Submission + - Vulnerability Numerology: Defective by Design?

rdmreader writes: RDM has a point by point disassembly of why the security vulnerability story George Ou of ZDnet regularly rehashes is wrong. Ou condemns Linux and Mac OS X by tallying up reported flaws and comparing them against Microsoft's. What he doesn't note is that his source, Secunia, only lists what vendors and researchers report, selectively includes or excludes component software seemingly at random, and backhandedly claimed its data is evidence of what it now tells journalists they shouldn't report. Is Secunia presenting slanted information with the expectation it will be misused, or is it just bad journalism at ZDnet?
Social Networks

Submission + - OpenSocialNetwork: Social Network Of Open Source (opensocialnetwork.es)

An anonymous reader writes: OpenSocialNetwork is a project established at SourceForge to create a social network of open source between all users and developers. Want compete with other social networks popular and has important features as have several social networks (e.g. Professional, Family, Friends, etc...) Currently are looking for developers and habitual users of social networks to complete the features of the project.
Programming

Submission + - (how) do you print your code? 2

Thunder Rabbit writes: "When trying to grok the flow of code, I can't always do it just on the screen. When I come across a closing bracket, it may be several hundred lines below its opener. Even if they are correctly commented, it's hard for me to get the overview into my brain.

At my office, though I can print the code in syntax driven glorious full color, it comes out on individual sheets of letter paper (landscape, with minimized margins).

I long for the fanfold paper we had in university. It was black and white, but it was all contiguous; I could draw lines along the left margin connecting opening and closing brackets, and immediately get a better sense of the program's flow. And (goodness forbid) a bug caused by a missing or superfluous bracket? I could find that problem in a trice.

Nowadays I print my pages, then use tape to string them all together to get my fanfold fix.

What about you? How do you print your code?"
Handhelds

Submission + - Wearing a computer at work 1

Roland Piquepaille writes: "The European Union has funded an ambitious project related to wearable technology. This project, named WearIT@work will end in one year and was funded with 14.3 million euros of EU money, even if the total project cost is expected to exceed 23 million euros. For mobile workers, the goal is to replace traditional interfaces, such as screen, keyboard or computer unit, by speech control or gesture control, without modifying the applications. This wearable system is currently being tested in four different fields including aircraft maintenance, emergency response, car production and healthcare. But read more for additional references and pictures showing emergency rescuers and doctors using some of these wearable computers to ease their work."
PHP

Submission + - How to convince a coworker to use getters/setters 2

An anonymous reader writes: I've just started a new job as a PHP programmer at a small startup. Two other programmers work at the company. One is a recent hire like me, and the other has worked there for several years, entirely in isolation, writing what he believes to be top-notch PHP code. The problem is this was his first professional coding gig and his code is kludgy, buggy, quirky and smacks of a lot of bad habits. He doesn't use getters and setters. He modifies the values in the $_GET, $_POST, and $_REQUEST superglobals. He makes excessive use of objectionable features of PHP such as the @ error suppression construct and the global keyword. He suppresses all warnings and notices. He uses __autoload() and other magical functions. But he wrote 99% of the code, and as convoluted as it is, it works and runs the business successfully. He feels threatened by us newcomers when we try to suggest he should do things differently. How can we (the newcomers) convince him to practice good encapsulation by using getters & setters for a start?
Security

Submission + - New Zealand Nabs Cyber Crime Kingpin (techluver.com)

Tech.Luver writes: "Police nabbed the suspected teenage kingpin of an international cyber crime network accused of infiltrating 1.3 million computers and skimming millions of dollars from victims' bank accounts, officials said. "Working with the FBI and police in the Netherlands, New Zealand police arrested the 18-year-old in the North Island city of Hamilton, said Martin Kleintjes, head of the police electronic crime center. The arrest was part of international probe into the criminal use of "botnets," in which hackers gain control of third-party computers through malicious software and then use them as remote-controlled robots to crash online systems, accept spam and steal users' personal information. ( http://techluver.com/2007/11/29/new-zealand-nabs-cyber-crime-kingpin/ )"
Power

Submission + - Ethanol Under Siege

Reservoir Hill writes: "Little over a year ago, ethanol was winning the hearts and wallets of both Main Street and Wall Street, with promises of greater US energy independence, fewer greenhouse gases and help for the farm economy. But the Wall Street Journal reports that critics now blame ethanol for pushing up food prices and dispute how much it really helps reduce the need for oil while environmentalists say additional ethanol production could strain water supplies and impair water quality and the EPA says that "ozone levels generally increase with increased ethanol use." President Bush gave ethanol a boost in his State of the Union speech in 2005 by calling for "strong funding" of renewable energy. Energy legislation that summer required oil companies to blend a total of 7.5 billion gallons of "renewable" fuels into the nation's fuel supply by 2012. Now the ethanol lobby is pushing for the Senate version of pending energy legislation, which includes a requirement that gasoline blenders use 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels by 2022 but formidable opponents such as the livestock, packaged-food and oil industries also have lawmakers' ears and what once looked like a slam-dunk could now languish in pending energy legislation that might not pass for weeks, if ever."
Censorship

Submission + - Egyptian Blogger Silenced by YouTube

Frosty Piss writes: "A Egyptian human rights activist has been muzzled after YouTube and Yahoo! shut down accounts belonging to the award-winning blogger. Cairo-based Wael Abbas regularly writes and posts video about police brutality, torture and sexual harassment in Egypt. One of the videos — of an Egyptian bus driver being sodomized with a stick by a police officer — was used as evidence to convict two officers of brutality, a rare occurrence in a country where human-rights groups say torture is rampant. YouTube said the decision to remove Abbas' videos had nothing to do with the Egyptian government, but was rather an internal decision."
Government

Submission + - Swiss DMCA quietly adopted (boingboing.net)

roady writes: We have seen a lot of talk about the Canadian DMCA. But few know about the Swiss version recently adopted by law makers, not even the Swiss people. The government and media have been very quiet, probably to avoid a referendum. Indeed, Switzerland is a direct democracy and if 50'000 citizens sign a referendum, the whole country will have a chance to vote against the new copyright law. In this version of the DMCA, sharing a file on P2P networks will land you one year in jail, even though the law mandates a levy on blank media. The history of the law can be read here.
The Courts

Submission + - Oregon AG Seeks to investigate RIAA tactics

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "Turning the tables on the RIAA's attempt to subpoena information from the University of Oregon about the identities of the university students, the Attorney General has now filed additional papers requesting permission from the Court to conduct immediate discovery into the RIAA's 'data mining' techniques, such as the use of unlicensed investigators, the turning over of subpoenaed information to collection agencies, the obtaining of personal information from computers. The AG pointed out (pdf) that "Because Plaintiffs routinely obtain ex parte discovery in their John Doe infringement suits.....their factual assertions supporting their good cause argument are never challenged by an adverse party and their investigative methods remain free of scrutiny. They often settle their cases quickly before defendants obtain legal representation and begin to conduct discovery...... and have dropped cases, such as their case against Tanya Andersen, in which their methods and practices have been challenged through counterclaims...... While the University is not a party to the case, Plaintiffs' subpoena affects the university's rights and obligations. Plaintiffs may be spying on students who use the University's computer system and may be accessing much more than IP addresses." As one commentator succinctly put it, "They'll be going bananas in RIAA land" after reading this filing."
Security

Submission + - Surveillance cameras find atomic chemist's killer (chicagotribune.com)

GlobalEcho writes: When a chemist was murdered in Chicago last week, police had few leads, until they reviewed the tape on nearby surveillance cameras. Cameras have been reviled for intruding on the privacy of the public, but it would seem there is a case to be made for having at least a few of them around, perhaps just enough of them (as here) to catch the stupid criminals (which is most of them).

Slashdot Top Deals

You do not have mail.

Working...