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Programming

Submission + - 10 Open Source Solutions You Should Be Using

waukarusa writes: "Linux tends to take center stage when it comes to support and other services for enterprise open source users. However, there are literally thousands of other solid open source packages available that perform a wide variety of functions. Unfortunately, there's a real lack of information about the options and considerations for selecting open source that not only meets the functional and technical requirements of specific tasks, but has the support and backing that enterprises need to manage risk. As a result, with enterprise developers lost in a sea of open source options, it can be a daunting task to make the best choice. http://opensource.sys-con.com/read/368028.htm"
Microsoft

Submission + - Vista Training Camp

Tony Keller writes: "The problems with Vista have been well noted, especially within a corporate environment. Helping circumvent the headaches, Training Camp, made famous for borrowing the military's 'bootcamp methodology,' will launch their 3-day Vista Bootcamp. They will ship trainees off to a reclusive, distraction free, environment to train IT pros on everything there is to know about the new operating system. This 'hell-weekend' will allow trainees to gain a complete understanding of the installation and administration of upgrading to Windows Vista — allowing them to troubleshoot some of the biggest complaints; Post-Installation Settings, Security even Mobile Computing. And when you're done, you'll have exactly what your major corporation needs to make the journey a smooth one."
The Internet

Submission + - P2P Networks Hijacked forDDoS Attacks

1sockchuck writes: "Peer-to-peer networks are being hijacked to launch distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks on web sites, according to security researchers and network service providers. In these attacks, large numbers of client computers running P2P software are tricked into requesting a file from the intended target of the DDoS, allowing the attacker to use the P2P network to overwhelm the target site with traffic. As many as 100,000 machines have been used in some of the attacks, which may be attractive to attackers, as they don't require the use of an existing "botnet" of compromised computers."
Power

Submission + - Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant Unit 1 Restarted

Firethorn writes: From Decatur Daily
Shut down 22 years ago in 1985, the Tennessee Valley Authority has reactivated Unit 1 at Browns Ferry Nuclear plant in response to rising demand for electricity in North Alabama. It's the first reactor activated since 1996.

It's expected to produce 1,155 megawatts, power 650,000 homes, and employ an extra 100 workers at the plant.

Renovations cost $1.8 Billion, but they expect the payback to be done within 4-5 years, down from the 7-8 years estimated in 2002, mostly because of increased fuel costs for the alternatives.

Feed Brown Dwarf Star Joins The Jet-set (sciencedaily.com)

Jets of matter have been discovered around a very low mass "failed star," mimicking a process seen in young stars. This suggests that these "brown dwarfs" form in a similar manner to normal stars but also that outflows are driven out by objects as massive as hundreds of millions of solar masses down to Jupiter-sized objects.
Sci-Fi

Submission + - Reminicent of Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

bsjpark writes: "One of my colleague forwarded me an article written by Dr. Michio Kaku, physicist and author, in an interview at KurzweilAI.net that ranges from the Multiverse to "The Matrix." (Equally entertaining in its own way is the classic geek
fight in the comments attached to the interview.)

When I read the below phrases regarding how we might be able to find/recognize/communicate with extra-terrestrial if we do ever meet them, it does makes perfect sense. Ever since I was a young boy (who was addicted to Star Wars and Star Trek), I always had similar questions because it doesn't always makes sense and not plausible to think that extra-terrestrial would every be in similar size, physical form, and/or in same spectrum of intelligence.

Many people believe that they would be some what recognizable... which I have no idea why would those people who would think such a thing. I believe most of the display of so called "aliens" are drawn in such a way for entertainment reasons as well as for people to be able to relate and recognize them. Think about it. If the aliens are indeed illumination form which are not recognized by any of the human senses and not interactive with people, think of how boring it would be. Human and aliens living together without even noticing each other. You cannot make a movie nor media material with such thing!

" I personally think that SETI is looking in the wrong direction. If, for example, we're walking down a country road and we see an anthill, do we go down to the ant and say, "I bring you trinkets, I bring you beads, I bring you knowledge, I bring you medicine, I bring you nuclear technology, take me to your leader"? Or, do we simply step on them? Any civilization capable of reaching the planet Earth would be perhaps a Type III civilization. And the difference between you and the ant is comparable to the distance between you and a Type III civilization. Therefore, for the most part, a Type III civilization would operate with a completely different agenda and message than our civilization.

        Let's say that a ten-lane superhighway is being built next to the anthill. The question is: would the ants even know what a ten-lane superhighway is, or what it's used for, or how to communicate with the workers who are just feet away? And the answer is no. One question that we sometimes ask is if there is a Type III civilization in our backyard, in the Milky Way galaxy, would we even know its presence? And if you think about it, you realize that there's a good chance that we, like ants in an anthill, would not understand or be able to make sense of a ten-lane superhighway next door.""
User Journal

Journal Journal: Open Source Art: Put Up Or Shut Up 15

One of the arguments that go back and forth in the fight over abolishing copyright is that if copyright is abolished, the financial incentive to create is removed and the supply of quality work is diminished. The abolishionists counter that this is not the case, but that new business models will evolve to work with the new system. But the only ones they point to as currently working are all based around software. I don't see it any currently working for other art forms on any sort of large sc
Announcements

Submission + - All Your Rights Are Belong to Us

cyrusmack writes: "For those of us that thought US copyright law was about the most draconian in the world, we were shocked by today's announcement of a new lobbyist group that wants even stronger copyright law. The group, called the "copyright alliance", features the usual suspects: Microsoft, MAFIAA, Viacom und herr Maus ("Look, it's Walt Disney! Shoot him now!"). Funnily enough, there was no mention of information access rights nor of US copyright law's gross violations of basic human rights. Funny that."
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Identical Twins Battle Over Paternety Test

ziggamon2.0 writes: Twin brothers Raymon and Richard Miller are the father and uncle to a 3-year-old little girl. The problem is, they don't know which is which. Or who is who. Since they are identical twins, and have the exact same DNA they are inseparable in paternety tests. How is one to know? And if their DNA is really the same, in a biological perspective, does it really matter?

Feed Harvard, Princeton researchers developing implantable "biocomputers" (engadget.com)

Filed under: Misc. Gadgets

Researchers at Harvard and Princeton have announced that they've made a "crucial step" in the development of so-called "biocomputers," which could one day be implanted in patients to directly attack diseased cells or tissues Fantastic Voyage-style. According to Physorg, the computers are actually constructed entirely out of DNA, RNA, and proteins, and are able to translate complex cellular signatures like the activities of multiple genes into a form that can be more readily observed. Currently, the researchers have demonstrated that the biocomputers can work in human kidney cells in culture, although they seem confident that they'll eventually find a wind range of uses, including working in conjunction with biosensors or medicine delivery systems to target, for instance, only cancerous or diseased cells, without causing any harm to the patient's healthy cells.

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