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Comment Re:Six years is not a short term (Score 2) 104

But there are distinctions made among prisoners that determine where you end up. . .

Prisoner security categories in the United Kingdom

Assuming you make it so far as prison . . .

In soft-bellied Britain, it's hard to stay in prison for long. Even getting into jail is difficult

Might be a tougher ride in the future.

Do prisoners get a cushy ride in British jails?

Comment Re:Short prison terms? (Score 1) 104

You forget to disable the hyperbole filter before posting. You best be careful with that, miss. Were you to post on the wrong topic, you could find a constable at the door, and yourself up on charges.

. . . the very same words can be proof of two entirely different hate crimes. Iqbal Sacranie is a Muslim of such exemplary "moderation" he's been knighted by the Queen. The head of the Muslim Council of Britain, Sir Iqbal was interviewed on the BBC and expressed the view that homosexuality was "immoral," was "not acceptable," "spreads disease," and "damaged the very foundations of society." A gay group complained and Sir Iqbal was investigated by Scotland Yard's "community safety unit" for "hate crimes" and "homophobia." Independently but simultaneously, the magazine of GALHA (the Gay and Lesbian Humanist Association) called Islam a "barmy doctrine" growing "like a canker" and deeply "homophobic." In return, the London Race Hate Crime Forum asked Scotland Yard to investigate GALHA for "Islamophobia." Got that? If a Muslim says that Islam is opposed to homosexuality, Scotland Yard will investigate him for homophobia; but if a gay says that Islam is opposed to homosexuality, Scotland Yard will investigate him for Islamophobia. Two men say exactly the same thing and they're investigated for different hate crimes. ---- GAGGING US SOFTLY

Submission + - Swedish data center saves $1M a year using seawater for cooling (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: A data center in Sweden has cut its energy bills by a million dollars a year using seawater to cool its servers, though jellyfish are an occasional hazard. Interxion, a collocation company in the Netherlands that rents data center space in 11 countries, uses water pumped from the Baltic Sea to cool the IT equipment at its facilities in Stockholm. The energy used to cool IT equipment is one of the costliest areas of running a data center. Companies have traditionally used big, mechanical chillers, but some are turning to outside air and evaporative techniques as lower-cost alternatives.
Idle

Submission + - Unraveling Claims of Conspiracy Behind Venezuela's Shortage (guardian.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Is it a subtle and devious conspiracy? Incompetent government at work? Market forces? Or perhaps the law of unintended consequences? Any way you look at it, Venezuela is in a bad way, as reported by the Guardian: "First milk, butter, coffee and cornmeal ran short. Now Venezuela is running out of the most basic of necessities – toilet paper. . . Economists say Venezuela's shortages stem from price controls meant to make basic goods available to the poorest parts of society and the government's controls on foreign currency. "State-controlled prices – prices that are set below market-clearing price – always result in shortages. The shortage problem will only get worse, as it did over the years in the Soviet Union," said Steve Hanke, professor of economics at Johns Hopkins University. President Nicolás Maduro, who was selected by the dying Hugo Chávez to carry on his "Bolivarian revolution", claims that anti-government forces, including the private sector, are causing the shortages in an effort to destabilise the country. "

Comment Re:But does it work well in practice? (Score 1) 94

Tor cloaks your requests both by encrypting the HTTP part, and by masking the DNS part. If you access it over tor at work, all anyone will know is that youre using tor.

If you lived in a genuine totalitarian state, they'd just use the fact that you used tor at all as evidence that you were an enemy of the state and torture the information out of you.

Comment Re:But does it work well in practice? (Score 1) 94

Just another example of sacrificing freedom and privacy for perceived safety (from counterfeiting, in this case). Even though this has been known about for quite a while now, it still seems just as pathetic.

No, counterfeiting is a genuine problem, not something made up to stop you from printing out child abuse images anonymously..

But no doubt you think we should not only go back to the Gold Standard, but only use actual gold pieces as currency too.

Comment Re:Tanks work the same way (Score 5, Interesting) 551

Hmmm.... looks like the M1 Abrams might be a proper tank after all.

Line-of-Sight Stabilization Systems

The dual-axis head mirror can be operated with either analog or digital VME control electronics.

The dual-axis system provides improved image acquisition, improved target tracking, and maintains the sight aim retinal at the sight's center of view.

The dual-axis system is available in two configurations. The larger assembly is designed for the M1 Abrams head assembly envelope. The smaller unit will fit within the M60 tank or standard M36 sight head periscope sight.

A great book on the M1 Abrams: King Of The Killing Zone

Hats off to Her Majesty's research establishment for the development of Chobham armour.

Comment Re:(oblig) Better late than never (Score 4, Interesting) 143

Had the software been around when I used a C64 (when they were the state of the art) . .

What do you mean? C64 still is state of the art . . . for 1982.

On the other hand, a clever hack borders on being timeless - for example and inspiration if nothing else.

Certainly in a time of ever greater bloatware it can border on mind-blowing to consider what people used to do, and some still do, in handfuls or hundreds of bytes: The Puzzle

Visual Transistor-level Simulation of the 6502 CPU

Comment Re:Is it in a bunker ? (Score 1) 94

"a secure information-sharing platform called DeadDrop, built by Aaron Swartz shortly before he DroppedDead."

There is that. But also, The New Yorker is not really the first publication that comes to mind when I think of imparting secrets to a "news organization".

I mean, what would I send them? The inner secrets of socialites, dilitants, and various beat arteeests?

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