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Comment Re:1% (Score 1) 148

Sorry, but lack of familiarity with the basic constructs of your language of choice is definitely a bad indicator. Being a good programmer means more than just knowing how to do the things you've already done. You need to know your language, platform, etc., so that you can spot issues or create solutions. Fizz Buzz is only a stupid test because it is so easy. It sounds like you think the "ability to research and find solutions" means that you can find a solution to your problem to copy+paste off of Stack Overflow.

I heartily agree. There's no excuse for not knowing what mod is, even if you've never happened to need it in a program. I wouldn't hire someone who didn't know what mod is or couldn't explain it to someone else.

Comment Re:Far from harmless fun... but (Score 1) 258

the government is still just trying to maintain control.

But that's impossible! How will the government maintain control without the bureaucracy?

The regional governors now have direct control over their territories. Fear will keep the local currencies in line. Fear of this treasury.

bitcoins going physical would be huge.

Don't underestimate traditional currency. The ability to deliver money electronically around a planet is insignificant next to the power of the federal mint.

Comment Re:Sans lyrics, please (Score 3, Interesting) 370

I am the same way! But only for left-brain stuff. If I'm trying to code, I can't listen to music with words, because it's super distracting. But if I'm, say, focusing on something right-brain like drawing a picture or coloring in a book, then the words aren't distracting at all. The exception in the left-brain case is if I'm listening to an album I've already heard a zillion times — then my mind doesn't divert attention away to listen to the lyrics because it already has figured them out.

Comment Re:If I had to guess who the founder of bitcoin wa (Score 1) 120

I thought your story was going to go like this...

When I hear about bitcoin's founder I am reminded of a homeless man I met in Palo Alto in the 1990's, in his 30's or 40's. He used to stand on the street chanting weird things and you would think he was insane, which he was. But if you talked to him, you'd realize he was pretty smart too. Anyhow, he told me about how he was getting his P.H.D. in Economics from Yale, but they rejected his thesis which was basically about private currency, as his professors equated it with counterfeiting and he subsequently went semi-mad according to him. This guy was a smart homeless guy but also a little crazy, his shopping cart had various gadgets powered by car battery, and I think there was a reason he was hanging out in the valley at that time. Find him, and you will find the creator of bitcoin. Anyway, after he was all done telling me this, he looked intently at me and said, "By the way, can you spare some change? I need about tree fiddy."

Comment Re:Only temporary (Score 1) 641

Chimpanzees absolutely cannot function in human society. When they become agitated, people around them lose hands and eyes. If they're lucky.

"I don't know... It's not wise to upset a chimpanzee."
"But sir, nobody worries about upsetting a droid."
"That's 'cause a droid don't pull people's arms outta their sockets when they lose. Chimpanzees have been known to do that."

Comment Re:The Vote (Score 1) 641

What that meant is that slaveholding states had greater representation in the US House of Representatives than if the slaves were not counted.

Well, yes, that was a short-term consequence of it. But what it actually meant, in the long term (and why it was such a briliiant tactic!) is that it encouraged states to free their slaves in order to gain even more representation — because those "other persons" would then count as 1.0 as free persons, as opposed to only 0.6 as slaves. In other words, the slave-holding states were tricked by their own greed. It's brilliant.

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