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Submission + - First Bay Trail convertible to start at $349 (techreport.com)

crookedvulture writes: Bay Trail has its first convertible design win. Intel's newest SoC will be available in Asus' Transformer Book T100, which combines a 10.1" Windows 8.1 tablet with a keyboard dock that includes a gesture-friendly touchpad and USB 3.0 connectivity. The tablet is powered by an Atom Z3740 processor with quad cores clocked at up to 1.8GHz—600MHz slower than the Z3770 chip benchmarked by the press. The screen has a relatively low 1366x768 resolution, but at least the IPS panel delivers wide viewing angles. Asus clearly intends the T100 to be an entry level device; the 32GB version is slated to sell for just $349, and the 64GB one will cost only 50 bucks more. Those prices include the keyboard dock and a copy of Microsoft Office Home & Student 2013. They also bring Windows 8 convertibles down to truly budget territory, completing the collision between tablets and netbooks.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Can the iPhone Popularize Fingerprint Readers? (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: Apple’s iPhone 5S features a fingerprint scanner embedded in the home button. Of course, fingerprint-scanning technology isn’t new: Bloomberg Terminals feature a built-in fingerprint reader to authenticate users, for example, and various manufacturers have experimented with laptops and smartphones that require a thumb to login. But the technology has thus far failed to become ubiquitous in the consumer realm, and it remains to be seen whether the new iPhone—which is all but guaranteed to sell millions of units—can popularize something that consumers don’t seem to want. Security experts seem to be adopting a wait-and-see attitude with regard to Apple’s newest trick. “I’d caution right away, let’s see how it tests and what people come up with to break it,” Brent Kennedy, an analyst with the U.S. Computer Emergency and Readiness Team, told Forbes . “I wouldn’t rely on it solely, just as I wouldn’t with any new technology right off the bat.” And over at Wired, technologist Bruce Schneier is suggesting that biometric authentication could be hacked like anything else. “I’m sure that someone with a good enough copy of your fingerprint and some rudimentary materials engineering capability — or maybe just a good enough printer — can authenticate his way into your iPhone,” he wrote. “But, honestly, if some bad guy has your iPhone and your fingerprint, you’ve probably got bigger problems to worry about.” So what do you think? Will Apple finally bring biometric scanning into wide use, or is this an effort doomed to failure?
Earth

Exxon Charged With Illegally Dumping Waste In Pennsylvania 246

Exxon has been charged with illegally dumping over 50,000 gallons of wastewater at a shale-gas drilling site in Pennsylvania. From the article: 'Exxon unit XTO Energy Inc. discharged the water from waste tanks at the Marquandt well site in Lycoming County in 2010, according to a statement on the website of Pennsylvania’s attorney general. The pollution was found during an unannounced visit by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection. The inspectors discovered a plug removed from a tank, allowing the wastewater to run onto the ground, polluting a nearby stream. XTO was ordered to remove 3,000 tons of soil to clean up the area. Wastewater discharged from natural-gas wells can contain chlorides, barium, strontium and aluminum, the attorney general’s statement showed. “Criminal charges are unwarranted and legally baseless,” the XTO unit said yesterday in a statement posted on its website. “There was no intentional, reckless or negligent misconduct by XTO.”'

Comment That'd be a Bitch... (Score 2) 226

A while back I jokingly told a fellow skydiver I refused to fall slower than the top speed in my car. Average terminal velocity is 120 mph. Falling at 200mph would be kind of a bitch. I might be able to fall faster than the Ferrari if you pushed it out the back of the plane, though (Actually, that'd make an awesome Red Bull commercial...)
Transportation

TSA Reminds You Not To Travel With Hand Grenades 378

coondoggie writes "Some of the travel recommendations posted on the Transportation Security Administration's blog seem stupefying obvious. This week's, entitled: 'Leave Your Grenades at Home' seemed like a no brainer, but alas. The TSA wrote about grenades in particular: Year to date, the agency's officers have discovered: 43 grenades in carry-on baggage and 40 grenades in checked baggage."
Open Source

How IP Law Helps FOSS Communities 98

dp619 writes "Fighting against software patents (New Zealand has banned them) tends to blind FOSS communities to aspects of IP law that actually serve them well. While certainly not perfect, patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secret law each has something to offer FOSS communities. Penn State law professor Clark Asay wrote a guest post for the Outercurve Foundation briefly describing some of the ways in IP law can help open source developers."
Space

Black Holes Grow By Eating Quantum Foam 164

An anonymous reader writes "The discovery that even the most distant galaxies have supermassive black holes at their cores is a puzzle for astrophysicists. These objects must have formed relatively soon after the Big Bang. But if a galaxy is only a billion years old and contains a black hole that is a billion times more massive than the Sun, how did it get so big, so quickly? Now one cosmologist says he has the answer: black holes feed off the quantum foam that makes up the fabric of spacetime. This foam is 'nourishing' because it contains quantum black holes that can contribute to the black hole's growth. This idea leads to a prediction: that the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way must also be growing in this way and at a rate that we should be able to measure. Just watch out for the burps."

Submission + - Even in the 40s, FBI struggled to keep its watch list straight (muckrock.com)

v3rgEz writes: The problems with various government watch lists, particularly the TSA's, are well known, but a new release of documents shows just how problematic large-scale government tracking can be: A recent FOIA request to the FBI for the files on late Irving Adler, activist, turned up plenty of reading material, but it was about the wrong Irving: An examination of documents showed that the files another Irving Adler, an Army veteran, found himself on the wrong end of intense questioning despite universal assertions that he was a "loyal and patriotic American."

The investigations hounded the second Irving for four years until the FBI realized it was watching the wrong man, and the boring Irving ultimately only cleared himself when it was shown he was serving abroad during the time the FBI thought he was in Long Island.

Surely these kinds of mistakes won't happen with modern databases.

Bug

SSD Failure Temporarily Halts Linux 3.12 Kernel Work 552

jones_supa writes "The sudden death of a solid-state drive in Linus Torvalds' main workstation has led to the work on the 3.12 Linux kernel being temporarily suspended. Torvalds has not been able to recover anything from the drive. Subsystem maintainers who have outstanding pull requests may need to re-submit their requests in the coming days. If the SSD isn't recoverable he will finish out the Linux 3.12 merge window from a laptop."
PC Games (Games)

Valve Announces Family Sharing On Steam, Can Include Friends 263

Deathspawner writes "Valve has today announced its next attempt at a console-killer: 'Family Sharing' is a feature that will allow you to share your Steam library with family and close friends. This almost seems too good to be true, and while there are caveats, this is going to be huge, and Valve knows it. As Techgage notes, with it you can share nearly your entire Steam library with family or friends, allowing them to earn their own achievements, and have their own saved games. 'Once a device is authorized, the lender's library of Steam games becomes available for others on the machine to access, download, and play. Though simultaneous usage of an account’s library is not allowed, the lender may always access and play his games at any time. If he decides to start playing when a friend is borrowing one of his games, the friend will be given a few minutes to either purchase the game or quit playing.'"

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Cloud Service on a Budget? 3

MadC0der writes: We just signed a project with a very large company. We are a computer vision based company and our project gathers images from a facility from PA. Our company is located in TN. The company we're gather images from is on a very high speed fiber optic network. However, being a small company of 11 developers, and 1 systems engineer, we're on a business class 100mb cable connection which works well for us but not in this situation.

The information gathered from the client in PA is s 1½mb .bmp image, along with a 3mb Depth map file, making each snapshot a little under 5 megs. This may sound small, but images are taken every 3-5 seconds. This can lead to a very large amount of data captured and transferred each day.

Our facility is incapable of handling such large transfers without effecting internal network performance.

We've come to the conclusion that a cloud service would be the best solution for our problem. We're now thinking the customer's workstation will sync the data with the cloud, and we can automate pulling the data during off hours so we won't encounter congestion for analysis.

Can anyone help suggest a stable, fairly price cloud solution that will sync large amounts for offsite data for retrieval at our convenience (nightly Rsync script should handle this process)?

What would you use for this solution? Would be better off going with a Amazon type service?

Need some expert advice that has dealt with a similar situation before.

Submission + - Ferrari Unveils New Car Tech Idea: Make Car Go Really Fast (motorauthority.com)

cartechboy writes: Forget EV batteries and autonomous driving. Ferrari understands old-school advanced car tech — basically, let's make the thing go ridiculously fast. The Italians showed off very serious chasis technology today in the new Ferrari Speciale at the Frankfurt Auto Show. The new electronic "Side Slip angle Control" system (SSC) (world first in a production car) uses algorithms that compute and analyze lateral acceleration, yaw angle, steering wheel angle and wheel speed in real-time. The system compares these readings to target data, and then just adjusts traction control and electric differential, like boom. Basically, humans want to go as fast as possible. This technology may allow us to do that. ( Top speed: 202 mph.)

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