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Submission + - GIMP 2.4 Released 3

Enselic writes: After almost three years since the release of GIMP 2.2, the GIMP developers have just announced the release of GIMP 2.4.

The release notes speaks of scalable bitmap brushes, redesigned rectangle/ellipse selection tools, redesigned crop tool, a new foreground selection tool, a new align tool, reorganized menu layouts, improved zoomed in/zoomed out image display quality, improved priting and color management support and a new perspective clone tool.
Graphics

Submission + - Gimp 2.4 released

ColeonyxOnline writes: Gimp 2.4 was released today. Among the many improvements are the new user interface, new tools, support for a few more file formats, and better printing support.
The Gimp

Submission + - GIMP 2.4 released! (gimp.org)

MrDrBob writes: "Love it or hate it, version 2.4 of our Marmite-favoured graphics editor has been released, and includes quite a few big changes. The selection tools have been rewritten from scratch, including a new way of selecting things with round corners, as requested by web designers. Better zooming code means that whole lines of your image will no longer disappear when zoomed out, and new colour management code should be welcomed by digital photo artists. The GIMP also includes a new Tango-style icon set, which goes hand-in-hand with the redesigned website. Unfortunately, GEGL integration still isn't anywhere to be found, but perhaps it'll make it in a later release."
Media

Submission + - Blu-ray aims to exterminate DVD within three years

An anonymous reader writes: Armed with continually strong sales data, the Blu-ray Disc Association has said that Blu-ray will replace the DVD storage format within three years, according to this post.

"Within three years it will just be Blu-ray," Frank Simonis, the Blu-ray Disc Association's European chairman, said at the CeBIT technology trade show.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Wikipedia erroneously reports Sinbad dead

An anonymous reader writes: Is anyone stupid enough to believe what they read on Wikipedia anymore? Apparently so, since comedian Sinbad was dealing with hundreds of calls, e-mails and text messages sent by gullible fans after his Wikipedia entry was vandalized to report that he had died of a heart attack. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17638311/
Communications

Submission + - Cisco to Buy Webex

Dekortage writes: As the latest in a series of recent acquisitions, Cisco has agreed to buy Webex for US$3.2 billion. Cisco, known more for its networking gear, will be relying on Webex's popular online conferencing/collaboration service to expand into online business services. In typical marketing-speak, Cisco's Chief Development Officer says in the official press release that "The combination of Cisco and WebEx will deliver compelling solutions accelerating this next wave of business communications." For an extra ten points, can anyone name the flamboyant homosexual who appeared in Webex's early advertising?
Graphics

Submission + - LGPL Swfdec project now works with YouTube!

Ur@eus writes: "The swfdec library which is a LGPL licensed Flash library just announced that code making it work with YouTube has been checked into their Git repository. So you can now view your YouTube movies with an open source solution! This is the result of six months of intensive hacking by swfdec developer Benjamin Otte and a big step forward for opensource Flash support."
Music

Submission + - Audio Sombrero - A surround sound hat!

Ant writes: "Chairboy says "Is this the answer to the ancient question: 'How will I enjoy full surround sound while walking down the street?' Yes!!1!!1!eleventy!! A wicked combination of stylish and practical, it solves almost as many problems as it causes. It is a question wrapped in an enigma, wrapped in some sort of piece of bacon!""
Space

Submission + - Galileo in Jeopardy

goldfinger67 writes: Europe's proposed satellite-navigation system, Galileo, faces big delays and cost overruns unless major obstacles to its development are removed — and fast.
Discussions have come to a halt has to who will andorse the costs of this new system. The Idea beihind the project was to be a direct concurent to the GPS system, however, current discussions already show difficulties to agree on several points between countries and private investors...
Will this project ever come to light??
Complete story here
Intel

Submission + - High schooler is awarded $100,000 for research

wired_LAIN writes: A teenager from Oklahoma was awarded $100,000 in the Intel Science Talent Search competition for building an inexpensive and accurate spectrograph that can identify the specific characteristics of different kinds of molecules. While normal spectrographs can cost between $20,000 and 100,000 to build, her spectrograph cost less than $500 dollars. The 40 finalists' projects were judged by a panel of 12 scientists, all well established in their respective fields. Among the judges were Vera Rubin , who proved Dark Matter, and Andrew Yeager, one of the pioneers of stem cell research. My only question is: why aren't these kids given more media coverage?
Music

Submission + - An open letter to Steve Jobs: Drop DRM in iTunes.

Max Romantschuk writes: "In the wake of the recent EU stance on digital music and consumer lock-in, political pressure finally seems to be building up against DRM. Steve Jobs even claimed that he prefers DRM-free music. The EFF's DefectiveByDesign.org campaign has written an open letter to Steve Jobs. This excerpt pretty much sums it up: "It has been three weeks now since you published your pledge to drop DRM, and there have been many responses from commentators who have outlined actions you could take to back up your words. The fact that you have not taken any action leads us to ask the question: How genuine is your pledge?"

Help the EFF fight DRM. Sign the letter and let Mr Reality Distortion Field know that you care about DRM-free music."
The Internet

Submission + - Authority from nothingness at Wikipedia

CurtMonash writes: ""Everybody knows" that Wikipedia shouldn't be regarded as an authoritative source on anything. Well, Tom Relly of Register makes a compelling case, by way of anecdote, that mainstream journalists don't know actually this. And that makes for an interesting circularity:
  • Wikipedia is full of claims that are sourceable in principle, but aren't actually sourced.
  • Mainstream journalists use information from Wikipedia, even if it is not further sourced.
  • Those very articles can be viewed as authoritative for Wikipedia's own sourcing purposes.
  • Thus, unsourced information could, by virtue of having been placed in Wikipedia, grow to be regarded as authoritative by Wikipedia itself.


This phenomenon needs a name, and I am helpfully offering one: Circlesourcing. So how long will it now take for Wikipedia to have an entry of that name?"

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