Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Donations support an organization's services (Score 1) 443

Good luck trying to get a chargeback on your card if you use it for a donation. When the word "donation" is heard by the rep, they'll end the conversation right there. Donations with credit cards are like Western Union money transfers. Once you pay, the money is gone.

Note that a kickstarter contribution is not a donation, it's a payment for service, and you can certainly ask your credit card company for a chargeback if your backed project doesn't deliver.

Comment Re:Surprise! (Score 1) 443

nobody with any smarts at all would dare give their credit card info to a random merchant they have just found on the internet

Why would you care? It's trivial to get it fixed with your credit card company.

Comment Re:The only cheap international way to do transfer (Score 1) 443

Paypal does not really work internationally. I've tried. You can't use a credit card in an account that's not in the same country as the card's issuing bank. If you have got credit cards in banks in ten countries, you need 10 different paypal accounts. It's insane.

Even worse: eBay somehow, by default, blocks foreign PayPal accounts from paying for purchases even if the seller ships internationally. I've tried to buy an iPad 2 for my sister living in Europe, using her credit card on her paypal account. 30 different eBay sellers would refuse to accept the payment.

Comment Re:slow news day (Score 3, Interesting) 168

very little life can survive being frozen

On the contrary, and Samantha Wright please correct me if I'm wrong, but I'd think a whole big hunking lot of single-cellular life can in fact survive being frozen. I mean, come on, human fucking sperm even does. Never mind that frozen life is well, frozen. While the DNA repair mechanisms are dormant, so are the copying mechanisms. Bacteria can live quite deep within porous rocks. I'm not exactly sure if it's really necessary for ejecta to be always heated up to sterilization. Now I'm not saying that this little life-from-Mars theory has got any legs to stand on just yet, but your arguments don't really do much to discount it, I don't think.

Comment Re:The emperor has no clothes (Score 1) 526

Must have never heard of prosecutorial discretion, then. Nobody, neither personally nor at any level of government, has any obligation to uniformly enforce all laws. I'd have hoped that people who think otherwise are just happy drug users - to my bewilderment, it turns out not to be the case :(

Comment Re:Yes (Score 1) 736

The major gain from Watson-like solutions is that you can have a multi-specialist system. It's nigh impossible for a family doctor to have specialist (as opposed to general) knowledge in other areas of medicine. Such specialist knowledge could be useful, though, so a Watson-style solution may turn out to be a vastly better doctor in the end. The human touch still matters, of course, but that means you can have a Watson-backed nurse relegating classical doctors into the dustbin of history.

Comment Re:Yes (Score 1) 736

We have enough buildings to house people for the next 100 years.

What?! What buildings? In the U.S., a typical 30-year-old house is ready for a major renovation, including serious energy-related overhaul. A lot of buildings older than say 50 years may need to be torn down and replaced as it'll be cheaper than fixing them up. Never mind that the population grows, so no, we still need new buildings all the time. Of course the population growth might stop or even reverse into a decline, but you'll still need new buildings. I think the real issue is that the middle class has been virtually relocated to China.

Slashdot Top Deals

There is never time to do it right, but always time to do it over.

Working...