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Comment Re:VIDEO tag? (Score 1) 325

IIRC, Opera was actually the first browser to release a (alpha?) version of their browser that supported <video>.

For whatever reason they haven't released one since.

Comment Re:I'm a sinner on this one... (Score 2, Insightful) 620

And I do understand why it's forbidden.

But you're special and won't screw up, right?

It's amazing the rationalizations that people go through. Stop coming up with excuses and pay attention to the road.

You're not special, and you're threatening people's lives with your selfish stupidity.

Comment Re:Actual risk? (Score 1) 620

Talking on a phone is equivalent to DUI: http://hfs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/48/2/381

It doesn't matter if you're using a hand-held or hands-free phone: http://hfs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/48/1/196

In other words, the danger lies in your concentration not being on the road. If you're writing text, you're not concentrating on the road. Therefore I'd be surprised if texting didn't have similar risks.

Please, do the right thing. It won't kill you to wait till you're at a destination to text. It might if you do (and others, unfortunately).

Comment Re:Uh huh. (Score 1) 1089

What decade do you live in, man? The 1980s? :/

http://www.xfree86.org/current/mit-shm.html

Also, I used to use X on a 486/66 with 16MB RAM -- and it worked comparable to Win95, which was quite good. My mp3 player has far more juice and memory than that machine did, let alone a netbook.

Please don't take about things you don't know about as if you do.

Programming

Submission + - Improve performance by merging & caching JS &a

NewsCloud writes: "Although breaking up stylesheets and Javascript into different files may be good practice, your resulting Web pages can actually experience a couple of problems from this. Since each CSS and JS file you link on a page performs a server request, the net performance on your site may be slowed. Furthermore, when you make updates to files, users may experience layout or scripting bugs due to client-side caching behaviors. Ed Eliot wrote an elegant script that merges CSS or JS files into individual files to improve performance and manage versioning automatically. He recently added JSMin compression to reduce delivery bandwidth further (a commenter added a PHP port of JSMin). I extended Ed's code to support multiple bundles and found my site performance greatly improved. It's also nice not to have to worry anymore about caching errors around CSS or JS updates. Ed's blog offers a number of other very useful, well-written PHP scripts (via Bazaar repository)."
Programming

Submission + - Mono brings Visual Basic programs to Linux

flydpnkrtn writes: "'The Mono Project on Feb. 20 announced that it has developed a Visual Basic compiler that will enable software developers who use Microsoft Visual Basic to run their applications on any platform that supports Mono, such as Linux, without any code modifications.'

As the article says, '37 percent of enterprises use Microsoft Visual Basic.NET for development and maintenance of their in-house applications. Among .NET developers, 59 percent use Visual Basic.NET as their only programming language.'

IMO this is huge news — instead of using such products as RealBasic to get cross-platform goodness you can run Visual Basic apps on anything Mono runs on, and oh by the way you don't have to relearn anything."
Biotech

Submission + - Promissing cancer cure at University of Alberta

dsieme01 writes: "Human trials will start in the near future is the goal. It's exciting to see research that should provide for a low cost, simple method. Unfortunately big drug companies appear not to be interested.

Quoting from http://www.depmed.ualberta.ca/dca/

DCA is an odourless, colourless, inexpensive, relatively non-toxic, small molecule. And researchers at the University of Alberta believe it may soon be used as an effective treatment for many forms of cancer.

Dr. Evangelos Michelakis, a professor at the U of A Department of Medicine, has shown that dichloroacetate (DCA) causes regression in several cancers, including lung, breast, and brain tumors.

Michelakis and his colleagues, including post-doctoral fellow Dr. Sebastian Bonnet, have published the results of their research in the journal Cancer Cell.

Scientists and doctors have used DCA for decades to treat children with inborn errors of metabolism due to mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondria, the energy producing units in cells, have been connected with cancer since the 1930s, when researchers first noticed that these organelles dysfunction when cancer is present.

Until recently, researchers believed that cancer-affected mitochondria are permanently damaged and that this damage is the result, not the cause, of the cancer. But Michelakis, a cardiologist, questioned this belief and began testing DCA, which activates a critical mitochondrial enzyme, as a way to "revive" cancer-affected mitochondria.

The results astounded him.

Michelakis and his colleagues found that DCA normalized the mitochondrial function in many cancers, showing that their function was actively suppressed by the cancer but was not permanently damaged by it.

More importantly, they found that the normalization of mitochondrial function resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth both in test tubes and in animal models. Also, they noted that DCA, unlike most currently used chemotherapies, did not have any effects on normal, non-cancerous tissues.

"I think DCA can be selective for cancer because it attacks a fundamental process in cancer development that is unique to cancer cells," Michelakis said. "One of the really exciting things about this compound is that it might be able to treat many different forms of cancer".

Another encouraging thing about DCA is that, being so small, it is easily absorbed in the body, and, after oral intake, it can reach areas in the body that other drugs cannot, making it possible to treat brain cancers, for example.

Also, because DCA has been used in both healthy people and sick patients with mitochondrial diseases, researchers already know that it is a relatively non-toxic molecule that can be immediately tested patients with cancer."
Programming

Submission + - An Introduction to Haskell

blackbearnh writes: "Over at O'Reilly's ONLamp site, a two part series is running that introduces the Haskell functional programming language. From the article:



Of course, it's not necessary to use a functional programming language to use these techniques. Because ideas from the functional programming world are appearing in mainstream languages, it is more important than ever to understand these techniques. Tom Christiansen said it best:

A programmer who hasn't been exposed to all four of the imperative, functional, objective, and logical programming styles has one or more conceptual blindspots. It's like knowing how to boil but not fry. Programming is not a skill one develops in five easy lessons.

Many programming languages offer a mixture of styles. Most object oriented languages have an imperative core, where classes, objects and methods provide a thin veneer over a language that is little more than a slightly improved version of C. Many functional programming languages mix functional, imperative, and object-oriented styles together in a manner that makes it difficult to tell them apart.

Haskell, on the other hand, is a purely functional language that restricts itself to the functional style of programming. Learning and using Haskell makes it easy to see the power and benefits of lambda calculus and functional programming.
"

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