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Comment Re:BTRFS filesystem (Score 1) 321

The next time you want to slam someone for "acting like you know what you're talking about", don't respond with a bunch of links to Wikipedia. Links, I might add, that are only marginally-relevant to the topic at hand. That shit wouldn't fly in college, so why do you think it's going to hold weight in a professional environment?

Slashdot, a 'professional environment'? As if we needed more proof that you're a fucking lunatic...

Submission + - How Steve Jobs Got the Liver He Needed in Memphis

theodp writes: The Commercial Appeal's Marc Perrusquia takes an in-depth look into how Steve Jobs got the liver he needed in Memphis. "Steve Jobs' 2009 liver transplant in Memphis gave the tech icon two more years of life," Perrusquia begins. "It gave life, too, to a complicated, divisive debate over multiple listing, the legal but little-known practice of getting on waiting lists at two or more hospitals. Though it favors the rich, multiple listing is giving numbers of ordinary Americans a chance. A chance to survive. A chance for a new life." Adding fuel to the controversy over Jobs' transplant is a new revelation that before calling 'dibs' on a mansion purchased by Jobs for his recuperation, the Apple CEO's liver transplant surgeon took up residence in the two-story 5,800-square-foot Italianate home for a period of two years during which time Jobs' lawyer and friend, SF attorney George Riley (who's also worked as Apple's outside counsel), personally covered the estate's property taxes and utilities. "It strikes me as a potential conflict of interest," said NYU bioethicist Arthur Caplan. "It strikes me as straining ethical credulity to have him there saying, 'Well, you know, I just lived here. I was just lucky. And this guy just chose to pay my rent.'"

Submission + - How Steve Jobs Got the Liver He Needed in Memphis

theodp writes: The Commercial Appeal's Marc Perrusquia takes an in-depth look into how Steve Jobs got the liver he needed in Memphis. "Steve Jobs' 2009 liver transplant in Memphis gave the tech icon two more years of life," Perrusquia begins. "It gave life, too, to a complicated, divisive debate over multiple listing, the legal but little-known practice of getting on waiting lists at two or more hospitals. Though it favors the rich, multiple listing is giving numbers of ordinary Americans a chance. A chance to survive. A chance for a new life." Adding fuel to the controversy over Jobs' transplant is a new revelation that before calling 'dibs' on a mansion purchased by Jobs for his recuperation, the Apple CEO's liver transplant surgeon took up residence in the two-story 5,800-square-foot Italianate home for a period of two years during which time Jobs' lawyer and friend, SF attorney George Riley (who's also worked as Apple's outside counsel), personally covered the estate's property taxes and utilities. "It strikes me as a potential conflict of interest," said NYU bioethicist Arthur Caplan. "It strikes me as straining ethical credulity to have him there saying, 'Well, you know, I just lived here. I was just lucky. And this guy just chose to pay my rent.'"

Comment Re:Shall we chase the other unicorn instead? (Score 1) 51

I can't bother to read past your first idiotic comment.

Wow, that is how you respond to seeing your argument torn to shreds? You pick one comment to snipe on and then declare yourself the victor.

I didn't pick one comment: I read only the first one, and then gave up when you lied about what I wrote. And you're doing it again, so again, I won't continue reading.

Comment Re:Shall we chase the other unicorn instead? (Score 1) 51

This isn't about the free market.

False. It is removing arbitrary restrictions on business. This is about the free market.

If you dramatically increase the number of different health insurance plans that any given office is expected to be able to handle ...

Irrelevant. Not my problem. We are freeing the market. Adapt or die.

You are forcing them to ...

Anything you say next is false. I am forcing nothing. Neither is the government. If they are forced to do anything, it is by free market forces.

Who is it a good thing for

Everyone, except for those relying on government to protect their interests against the reasonable interests of others, and I have no sympathy for such people.

Could you go further off topic if you tried?

I didn't go off-topic at all.

There are no federal regulations preventing the sale of insurance from state A in state B

So? I wonder why you think you're making a point.

indeed what the conservatives are looking to do with their proposal is to usurp the state right to refuse plans

I do not recognize the "right" of any government to ban the sale of a legal product or service.

Furthermore that idea will increase the cost of delivering health care.

Even if that is true -- it's not -- it's irrelevant.

This is not a huge issue for me: while it is absolutely clear that laws restricting the sale of legal goods and services are stupid and harmful, it would have far less of an impact on freeing of the health market than much more sensible and broad legislation: to remove the business subsidies for health insurance, and replace it with an individual income tax credit, which will necessarily have the effect of driving down -- massively -- the cost of care and insurance.

Comment Re:Shall we chase the other unicorn instead? (Score 1) 51

...the worst of all worlds is a government that keeps burdensome or expensive regulations around just to make sure businesses that rely on those regulations don't suffer.

That is precisely the world you live in today.

In many areas, yes. I hope you don't think you're arguing against me in some way.

Comment Re:Shall we chase the other unicorn instead? (Score 1) 51

If we went for the classic conservative talking point of "sell insurance across state lines" we would see a large number of small offices closing as well

So what? Seriously. If a small business can't handle the free market, then it should go away. That's not a bad thing, it's a good thing, and the worst of all worlds is a government that keeps burdensome or expensive regulations around just to make sure businesses that rely on those regulations don't suffer.

Submission + - Firefox 26 Arrives With Click To Play For Java Plugins

An anonymous reader writes: Mozilla today officially launched Firefox 26 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. Additions include Click to Play turned on by default for all Java plugins, more seamless updates on Windows, and a new Home design for Android. Firefox 26 has been released over on Firefox.com and all existing users should be able to upgrade to it automatically. As always, the Android version is trickling out slowly on Google Play. Release notes are here: desktop and mobile.
Christmas Cheer

Gift Idea: Custom Photomosaics With AndreaMosaic and PhotoGrabber 61

Bennettt Haselton has a gift idea for this year that needn't necessarily cost you any money (if you have a color printer available), though as he points out there are ways to invest in a higher-quality result. The gift? A unique picture created with a few pieces of free software and a bit of your time. Bennett writes: "You can use these little-known free programs to create a photomosaic of a friend's wedding photo or other favorite photograph, for a uniquely personal gift that doesn't cost much but can still delight. Follow these steps to use the programs most effectively and get the best results." Read on for the rest.
Data Storage

Ask Slashdot: Practical Bitrot Detection For Backups? 321

An anonymous reader writes "There is a lot of advice about backing up data, but it seems to boil down to distributing it to several places (other local or network drives, off-site drives, in the cloud, etc.). We have hundreds of thousands of family pictures and videos we're trying to save using this advice. But in some sparse searching of our archives, we're seeing bitrot destroying our memories. With the quantity of data (~2 TB at present), it's not really practical for us to examine every one of these periodically so we can manually restore them from a different copy. We'd love it if the filesystem could detect this and try correcting first, and if it couldn't correct the problem, it could trigger the restoration. But that only seems to be an option for RAID type systems, where the drives are colocated. Is there a combination of tools that can automatically detect these failures and restore the data from other remote copies without us having to manually examine each image/video and restore them by hand? (It might also be reasonable to ask for the ability to detect a backup drive with enough errors that it needs replacing altogether.)"

Submission + - A Conversation With Bruce Schneier

An anonymous reader writes: Following on Eben Moglen's mind-warping series of talks about life after Snowden, the Software Freedom Law Center has invited Bruce Schneier to join Eben for a conversation informed by Bruce's own analysis of the leaked documents. Bruce is one of the smartest thinkers around when it comes to understanding how security and surveillance operate in the real world. And he is unsurpassed at presenting complicated security concepts even to people who lack his expertise. Between Moglen's sophisticated thoughts and Bruce's grounded approach, we're sure to learn a lot about where we stand and what we can do next!

Submission + - New Documentary Chronicles Road Tripping Scientists Promoting Reason

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Dennis Overbye reports on the NYT that two years ago Richard Dawkins and Lawrence Krauss set off on a barnstorming tour to save the world from religion and promote science. Now their adventure is now the subject of “The Unbelievers,” a documentary out just in time for Christmas, "If you think a road trip with a pair of intellectuals wielding laptops is likely to lack drama, you haven’t been keeping up with the culture wars," writes Overbye. The scientists are mobbed at glamorous sites like the Sydney Opera House. Inside, they sometimes encounter clueless moderators; outside, demonstrators condemning them to hellfire. At one event, a group of male Muslim protesters are confronted by counterprotesters chanting, “Where are your women?” "Travelogue shots, perky editing and some popular rock music, as well as interview bits with such supportive celebrities as Woody Allen, Cameron Diaz, Sarah Silverman and Ricky Gervais, shrewdly enliven the brainy — but accessible — discourse," writes Gary Goldstein in the LA Times, "but mostly the movie is an enjoyably high-minded love fest between two deeply committed intellectuals and the scads of atheists, secularists, free-thinkers, skeptics and activists who make up their rock star-like fan base." The movie ends at the Reason Rally in Washington, billed as the largest convention of atheists in history. Dawkins looks out at the crowd standing in a light rain and pronounces it “the most incredible sight I can remember ever seeing" and declares that too many people have been cowed out of coming out as atheists, secularists or agnostics. “We are far more numerous than anybody realizes."

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