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Comment Re:just say no (Score 1) 151

I follow this simple rule: Just say no to drugs that's been transported in another animals lower intestine, and you're safe.

Luckily the cat's ass variant is optional...

Actually, I'm rather addicted to caffeine, and that's slightly annoying as I get sick if I don't get coffee for a day or two.
Other than that, it's a rather harmless drug. (In concentrations that won't kill you immediately.) and i really enjoy my coffee.

Submission + - Popular Android distribution Cyanogenmod unable to dial Dutch emergency number (google.com)

GJdeBoer writes: A colleague of mine witnessed an accident last week and came across a rather life threathening bug in Cyanogenmod. Both he and his wife run a Cyanogenmod 10 on a Samsung Galaxy SII and they tried calling the Dutch emergency number 112 and were shocked to find out that the phone did not dial the number but responded with the error message: "Invalid Number". Also clicking on the Emergency button gives the same result.

A little researching brought up the bugreport on code.google.com and apparantly this bug is present since at least July 2012 in both Cyanogenmod 9 and Cyanogenmod 10.

Submission + - Little Change in Drought Over 60 Years (blogspot.com) 1

bricko writes: "More realistic calculations, based on the underlying physical principles8 that take into account changes in available energy, humidity and wind speed, suggest that there has been little change in drought over the past 60 years.

What does this mean?

For one, it means that a widely accepted and oft-repeated consensus position expressed in the IPCC 2007 now appears to have been incorrect. This should not be unexpected as a consensus position is a snapshot of perspectives, and in science, perspectives can change based on new evidence and study. The IPCC SREX, published earlier this year had already stepped back from the conclusions of the IPCC AR4."

Games

MIT Slows Down Speed of Light In New Game 113

New submitter schirra writes "Researchers at MIT Game Lab have created a free video game that accurately simulates the effects of Einstein's relativity. 'A Slower Speed of Light' challenges players to collect objects strewn throughout a level to artificially lower the speed of light. As light speed slows to walking pace, it makes visible the unusual effects one encounters when traveling close to the speed of light, such as the Doppler effect, searchlight effect and Lorentz transformation. The effects are, in a word, trippy. The team plans to release an open-source Unity3D toolkit called OpenRelativity to allow others to include the same relativistic effects in other games." They also plan to release the source code sometime next year (despite reports that it is open source already).

Comment Re:Messed up (Score 5, Informative) 259

It's standard treatment in Sweden. If the crime is non-trivial, the attorney almost always requests solitary confinement. The reason is to prevent the accused from interfering with the criminal investigation, but I think at least partly it's done in order to break the accused, helping the interrogations.

Sweden has been criticized by the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture for this practice, but nothing seems to change.

I'd say that I am not that proud of our judicial system right now. This practice, the not-so-competent handling of Assange, the recent turn of events relating to a convicted serial killer (Tomas Quick) being found innocent for crime after crime, after withdrawing his own confessions, and the follow-up revelations of a closed boys-club judicial system - these events makes me ashamed and worried.

It's not necessarily attributed to malice, but it is certainly incompetence combined with the attitude among Swedish bureaucrats that the government is always right, always efficient, and certainly *never* wrong.

Submission + - L'Aquila quake: Italy scientists guilty of manslaughter (bbc.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Six Italian scientists and an ex-government official have been sentenced to six years in prison over the 2009 deadly earthquake in L'Aquila.

A regional court found them guilty of multiple manslaughter.

Prosecutors said the defendants gave a falsely reassuring statement before the quake, while the defence maintained there was no way to predict major quakes.

The 6.3 magnitude quake devastated the city and killed 309 people

Comment Re:God bless the free market! (Score 5, Insightful) 386

Yes, but the price is almost the only information consumers can base there decision on. That, and the packaging design.

The only way to get more information is to legislate. The food industry would be happy if they could sell processed shit wrapped in
a nice box, without bothering with involving fish at all.

Privacy

Submission + - Government Censors Draft Snooping Laws (delimiter.com.au)

coolstoryhansel writes: Stating that release of the draft legislation is not in the public interest [PDF] because it would prejudice decision making processes already in train, the Attorney General's Department has denied the release of the draft laws that would see wide-scale dragnet surveillance implemented along with an expansion of law enforcement powers for the purposes of 'national security'.

Serkowski, speaking for the Pirate Party who lodged the FOI request labelled the Department response as "disgraceful and troubling" saying the decision is "completely trashing any semblance or notion of transparency or participative democratic process of policy development."

Comment Re:Must past this test (Score 1) 508

Hi.

Before you argue more about this, write a program that does something really simple, like packing a few arbitrary objects in a box just big enough to fit them, and then come back to this discussion. ( I mean the task must be really simple, because it's something even a small child can do. )

See you in a couple of years :-)

Comment Re:Must past this test (Score 1) 508

Why would a self driving car ever drive off a cliff?
Clearly it would rank available options and pick the lowest cost one.

Yes, in a science fiction fantasy world where True AI is working according to Asimov's laws.

In the actual world, real persons are going to outperform computers in any situation that's "tricky" to analyse,
and that will continue to be the case until the cars would be able to pass the Turing test.

The cars can be given better sensors (ir, radar, etc) and faster computers to give the algorithms an advantage,
but when it fails, it will fail in a way that a human would think is incomprehensibly stupid.

When the first autonomous car crashes into a kindergarten because it did something stupid, it will be hard to point
to the statistics and say that in the big picture, we're saving lives.

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