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Media

Submission + - A&E beaming adverts directly into your head. 2

Fantastic Lad writes: Hear Voices? It May Be an Ad. New Yorker Alison Wilson was walking down Prince Street in SoHo last week when she heard a woman's voice right in her ear asking, "Who's there? Who's there?" She looked around to find no one in her immediate surroundings. Then the voice said, "It's not your imagination." Indeed it isn't. It's an ad for "Paranormal State," a ghost-themed series premiering on A&E this week. The billboard uses technology manufactured by Holosonic that transmits an "audio spotlight" from a rooftop speaker so that the sound is contained within your cranium.
GNU is Not Unix

GPL Hindering Two-Way Code Sharing? 456

An anonymous reader writes "KernelTrap has some fascinating coverage of the recent rift between the OpenBSD developers and the Linux kernel developers. Proponents of the GPL defend their license for enforcing that their code can always be shared. However in the current debate the GPL is being added to BSD-licensed code, thereby preventing it from being shared back with the original authors of the code. Thus, a share-and-share-alike license is effectively preventing two-way sharing." We discussed an instance of this one-way effect a few days back.
Privacy

Canadian Border Tightens Due to Info Sharing 448

blu3 b0y writes "The San Francisco Chronicle is reporting that new information sharing agreements have made it as easy for a Canadian border officer to know the full criminal records of US citizens as it is for their local police. As a result, Canadian officials are turning away American visitors for ancient minor convictions, including 30-year-old shoplifting and minor drug possession convictions. Officials claim it's always been illegal to enter Canada with such convictions without getting special dispensation, they just had no good way of knowing about them until recent security agreements allowed access. One attorney speculates it's not long before this information will be shared with other countries as well, causing immigration hassles worldwide."
Security

MySpace and GoDaddy Shut Down Security Site 344

Several readers wrote in with a CNET report that raises novel free-speech questions. MySpace asked GoDaddy to pull the plug on Seclists.org, a site run by Fyodor Vaskovich, the father of nmap. The site hosts a quarter million pages of mailing-list archives and the like. MySpace did not obtain a court order or, apparently, compose a DMCA takedown notice: it simply asked GoDaddy to remove a site that happened to archive a list of thousands of MySpace usernames and passwords, and GoDaddy complied. Fyodor says the takedown happened without prior notice. The site was unavailable for about seven hours until he found out what was happening and removed the offending posting. The CNET article concludes: "When asked if GoDaddy would remove the registration for a news site like CNET News.com, if a reader posted illegal information in a discussion forum and editors could not be immediately reached over a holiday, Jones replied: 'I don't know... It's a case-by-case basis.'"
Programming

Submission + - The Architecture of Mailinator

hypnofrog writes: The creator of Mailinator gives a very comprehensive explanation of the architecture of the system. Up to 5million emails a day on 1 server! Not to mention the subpoena's and daily spam attacks. Interesting read!

Feed DHS Passenger Scoring Illegal? (wired.com)

A government program that's automatically flagged nearly 5,000 U.S. travelers as "suspected terrorists" appears to defy a Congressional prohibition against computerized risk ranking of ordinary Americans. Ryan Singel reports from Washington.


Java

Submission + - Good open source CMS solutions based on Java

namityadav writes: I've been looking for an open source Content Management System (CMS) which is widely used / supported, and has features like blogging, online communities, RSS feeds, forums, polls, calendars, website searching etc. The most obvious choices are Drupal (I've played with it in the past) and Joomla. But both of them are PHP based. Since I am a Java developer, I wanted to find something based on Java. To my surprise, I could find some very week Java based alternatives to Drupal .. like MMBase, OpenCMS and Magnolia. Which got me thinking why is it that there are so many PHP based open source CMS which are hugely successful (Drupal is used by The Onion, Spread Firefox etc), but there is not even one comparable solution based on Java?

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