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Comment Re:Why all the popularity? (Score 1) 72

Flappy Bird didn't gain popularity thanks to a great and innovative concept. It succeeded thanks to 1. initially fake reviews from the author 2. many people downloading it 3. and talking about it (basically asking the same question as yours) 4. more downloads. In other words, the snowball effect...

Well, actually, in a way, it won thanks to an "innovative" concept..

Comment Re:Why all the popularity? (Score 2) 72

Flappy Bird didn't gain popularity thanks to a great and innovative concept. It succeeded thanks to 1. initially fake reviews from the author 2. many people downloading it 3. and talking about it (basically asking the same question as yours) 4. more downloads. In other words, the snowball effect...

Comment Re:When greed breaks stuff (Score 1) 164

All the people who warned them that they will cause permanent micro- and macro- disasters

Many political figures have actually a "micro" view of events - i.e. the time difference [ NextElection - now ]. Not enough to accurately consider something as diluted in time as global warming.

Comment Re:Those wondering why 53.53 (Score 4, Informative) 164

TFA is confusing. The way I understand it is adding a TLD like '.home' may have some wrongly configured systems resolve something.home from the newly 'home' zone made available from the Internet DNS, instead of a local/intranet resolution. In order to help sysadmins to catch inappropriate Internet resolution of such TLD (in case that FQDN doesn't exist, I guess since not in TFA) is to return the 127.0.53.53 address, a particular loop-back address that allows particular settings to be implemented in order to log/show the user that the intranet domain is currently not available., e.g. for a user connected outside the company (guess 2).

Comment Re:hacky (Score 4, Insightful) 164

I'm sorry the Internet is a production network. Time for amateur hour expired with the 20th century

I'm sorry, I feel the time for amateur hours exploded in the 21th century. Competency was diluted among the many so-called experts answering the huge demand of engineers. It seems in bigger companies IT management is confined to ensure IT services work fine - meaning in most cases implement the fewer changes as possible - "don't fix what isn't broken". Most teams are not used anymore to hacking, customizing, improving, innovating. When something a bit trickier than usual rears its nose on the horizon, they're lost. DNS implementation is one of these trickier thing.

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