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Comment Target audience? (Score 4, Insightful) 158

TFA cites younger people as being the target audience. As a young person who also happens to know quite a few other young people this seems strange. In general, young people tend to understand the importance of NASA and space programs in general - we all know all know the associated trivia such as where ballpoint pens and Teflon came from. We all know the importance of science - we are all (unless you are in the Bible Belt of the USA) taught it in school and we are all aware of what science can do for us.

It seems to me that the people who actually need to be targeted are the middle aged and older people who are in control of the votes and money needed to revitalise the space programs. Luckily, there is some penetration of Star Trek into these age groups.

Comment Re:Anything but Ubuntu. (Score 1) 573

I usually condemn bashing a community, but the Ubuntu community is pretty much my only exception. $10 says there was probably an upstream fix, or quite possibly the bug stemmed from the way Ubuntu implemented NetworkManager - because they are known for having a bad implementation of NM just like they're known for their HORRID implementation of PulseAudio (not that even a good implementation of PA is particularly good).

Half the problem with Ubuntu is a whole is that the community are merely "fans", not the heart and soul of the project ala Debian, Arch and even Fedora despite being largely made up of RH employees. Community input and steering are almost non-existent. If the community was properly integrated then the community could have quick turn-around on fixing problems. At the moment, the only reasonable way to get fixes in is to go to the upstream projects and *hope* Ubuntu pulls down your code in a reasonable time-frame (if at all) - because working with upstream is a foreign concept in the Ubuntu work-flow. The cabal of Ubuntu devs short-cut sanity and apply patches downstream. The concept of working with upstream is so foreign in-fact that the use of PPAs is common place.. This behaviour is completely broken because it is not user friendly, it is not friendly to the wider open source community, it is not good for security and it is possibly leading users down the road of having data that or practices that are incompatible with any other fork of the software.

BTW, did you even try WICD as an alternative to NetworkManager? It would work around any NM specific problems and provide a far cleaner solution. In short you probably provided the classing "poor hackjob solution" I was referring to.

You should probably find the outdated and inaccurate documentation/forum post on how to install a spell checker. Have fun.

Comment Anything but Ubuntu. (Score 2) 573

Ubuntu has a terrible support community and the packages are usually full of silly bugs that no other distro has. I know this sounds like Troll bait... But the reasoning behind my statement is that they consistently suggest the most bizarre fixes for even common problems. If there is a "root of the problem" they will never attack that, but rather suggest outlandish (and nearly always incorrect) fixes for all the child problems instead. This is not productive or enjoyable. Ubuntu refuses to cooperate with upstream projects - they'd rather ignore them and cry when things don't work.

If you like Ubuntu, try Debian or some sort of direct Debian derivative instead. Unlike what many people like to say, Ubuntu is *not* Debian.

You mentioned that you like the look of Arch Linux - great distribution and excellent community. Unfortunately your skills are not up to the level that *mainline* Arch requires, but this does not prevent you from using a friendlier derivative. I suggest Cinnarch as the best friendly derivative because unlike Manjaro or Chakra it uses the main Arch repos instead trying to mix (well actually, that's not completely true, but for the purpose of the argument it is) and become broken as a result.

Another really good choice is Fedora - great distribution and excellent community. There are a lot of RPM haters but the truth is that anybody who has used a *modern* RPM based system knows that common arguments thrown up by crotchety old neck-beards and rabid Ubuntu fanbois are moot. There are a lot of haters of the new installer and not without reason - but keep in mind that most of that hate is purely hype. Of course there is going to be problems with the first iteration of any software.

Comment ownCloud News (Score 1) 287

ownCloud News is in alpha, but it is not a third party app - so it's pretty good quality. https://github.com/owncloud/apps/tree/master/news and the main guys blog (screenshots): http://algorithmsforthekitchen.com/blog/

Hopefully there is a public instance running ownCloud News for those people who don't run their own ownCloud instance. Most instances will probably enable ownCloud News when it comes out of alpha (very soon I think).

Comment This is not news. (Score 1) 158

This Steam for Linux is working on multiple distributions that are far more removed from Ubuntu than Debian - this has been the case for months now. I have it right here on Fedora, and I know it's available for Arch Linux too. The license for Steam has even been altered to make it easier for it to be repackaged and even hosted in distribution repositories.

Comment Re:Astroturfing (Score 2) 218

They're not selling well when compared to iPhones or many Android phones.

However the product is actually quite good (try it, prove me wrong) but the problem is that people aren't willing to give it a shot.
Hopefully the new Nokia Lumia 620 helps crack the mid/low end markets - I doubt quality-wise it will have many competitors in the price bracket. If they went with Android they'd probably be king of the hill right now.

I'm thinking that Nokia will die if they don't downsize, but if they do downsize they have a chance of rebuilding.

Comment Re:Wrong (Score 1) 349

OP is correct. A good hard dose of truth! Though, personally, I think the Ouya has a chance of giving the casual low-fi game sector (where Nintendo is currently king) a big shake up. Just don't pretend that it is even close to a solution for serious gaming. Maybe in 3+ years when mobile graphics are stepped up a couple of notches.

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