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Submission + - ICANN considers using '127.0.53.53' to tackle DNS namespace collisions (computerworld.com.au) 1

angry tapir writes: As the number of top-level domains undergoes explosive growth, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is studying ways to reduce the risk of traffic intended for internal network destinations ending up on the Internet via the Domain Name System. Proposals in a report produced on behalf of ICANN include preventing .mail, .home and .corp ever being Internet TLDs; allowing the forcible de-delegation of some second-level domains in emergencies; and returning 127.0.53.53 as an IP address in the hopes that sysadmins will have a WTF moment and Google it.

Submission + - Hackers circulate thousands of FTP credentials, New York Times among those hit (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: Hackers are circulating credentials for thousands of FTP sites and appear to have compromised file transfer servers at The New York Times, UNICEF and other organizations, according to a security expert. The hackers obtained credentials for more than 7000 FTP sites and have been circulating the list in underground forums, said Alex Holden, chief information security officer for Hold Security, a Wisconsin-based company that monitors cyberattacks.

Submission + - Australian police deploy 3D crime scene scanner (computerworld.com.au) 1

angry tapir writes: Police in the Australian state of Queensland will employ a handheld laser scanner that can be used to map crime scenes, including in areas where there is no GPS reception. The police will use the Australian developed Zebedee laser scanner: A LiDAR scanner that is mounted on a spring. As a user walks around, the spring moves and the scanner captures the surrounding area. Software processing then uses the data to construct a 3D model. Previously the technology has been used to capture areas of cultural significance, such as the interior of the Leaning Tower of Pisa. As an added bonus, the Zebedee looks ridiculous when in use.

Submission + - Chromebooks getting VMware virtual desktop service (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: VMware will offer virtual desktop services for Google's Chromebooks, allowing them to run Windows applications on the pared-down laptops based on the Chrome OS. Organizations could save as much as US$5,000 per computer by using a combination of Chromebooks and VMware managed services, Google has estimated.

Submission + - LinkedIn ditches feature that was a 'dream for attackers' (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: LinkedIn is shutting down Intro, its recently launched mobile service for connecting people over email, that raised security concerns. Intro was launched last October and described at the time as a 'dream come true for hackers' The service was made for the iPhone, and was designed to grab LinkedIn profile information and insert it into emails received on phones. The service displayed that information to the recipient from the email's sender if the sender was also on LinkedIn.

Submission + - Oracle broadens legal fight against third-party Solaris support providers (computerworld.com.au) 1

angry tapir writes: Oracle is continuing its legal battle against third-party software support providers it alleges are performing such services in a manner that violates its intellectual property. Last week, Oracle sued StratisCom, a Georgia company that offers customers support for Oracle's Solaris OS, claiming it had "misappropriated and distributed copyright, proprietary software code, along with the login credentials necessary to download this code from Oracle's password-protected websites."

Submission + - Security vendors self-censor Target breach details (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: At least three security companies have scrubbed information related to Target from the Web, highlighting the ongoing sensitivity around one of the largest-ever data breaches. How hackers broke into Target and installed malware on point-of-sale terminals that harvested up to 40 million payment card details is extremely sensitive. Now, details that give insight into the attack are being hastily removed or redacted by security companies.

Submission + - Target-related malware was a side job for man living in Russia (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: In a surprising TV interview, a 23-year-old living in Russia said he helped code a software program that experts believe was eventually modified to steal tens of millions of payment card details from Target. Rinat Shabayev, who lives in Saratov, Russia, told Lifenews.ru that the program has a defensive purpose of finding software problems but could have been abused by criminals. The news outlet characterized his work on the program as a side job, quoting him as saying, "I am trying to find work. I want to find a normal and stable job and time to start my own business."

Submission + - Target credit card data was sent to server in Russia (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: The stolen credit card numbers of millions of Target shoppers took an international trip — to Russia. A peek inside the malicious software that infected Target's POS (point-of-sale) terminals is revealing more detail about the methods of the attackers as security researchers investigate one of the most devastating data breaches in history. Findings from two security companies show the attackers breached Target's network and stayed undetected for more than two weeks. Over two weeks, the malware collected 11GB of data from Target's POS terminals. The data was first quietly moved to another server on Target's network and then transmitted in chunks to a U.S.-based server that the attackers had hijacked. Logs from that compromised server show the data was moved again to a server based in Russia starting on Dec. 2.

Submission + - California court dismisses Google Glass traffic ticket (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: A court in Southern California has dismissed what was apparently the first-ever traffic citation issued for wearing Google Glass while driving. Cecilia Abadie was stopped for speeding in late October. When a California Highway Patrol officer approached her, he noticed she was wearing the Google Glass device and issued a second ticket for that. However a court commissioner in San Diego dismissed the Google Glass ticket, saying he could find no evidence that the device was in use while Abadie was driving

Submission + - US government to convert Silk Road bitcoins to USD (techworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: The founder of the Silk Road underground website has forfeited the site and thousands of bitcoins, worth around US$28 million at current rates, to the U.S. government. The approximately 29,655 bitcoins were seized from the Silk Road website when the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) moved to close it in late September. "The United States Marshals Service shall dispose of the Silk Road Hidden Website and the Silk Road Server Bitcoins according to law," wrote Judge J. Paul Oetken, of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, in a court order that was issued this week. The ruling represents the largest-ever forfeiture of bitcoins. "It is the intention of the government to ultimately convert the bitcoins to U.S. currency," said Jim Margolin, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's office for the Southern District of New York.

Submission + - Adobe adds 3D printer support to Photoshop (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: Adobe has rolled out an update to Photoshop that incorporates direct support for 3D printing. According to Adobe, they don't expect most users to directly create 3D meshes in Photoshop. Instead they expect most of the time people will import objects from other applications and then use Photoshop as a finishing tool to tweak and repair meshes — in a similar fashion to how Photoshop can be used to tweak photos before production. The application currently directly supports MakerBot printers and the online Shapeways service. More printer support is coming (printer profiles are editable XML files) and the application can also export STL files that can be copied to a USB drive and used on other brands of 3D printer.

Submission + - Amazon drones are 'fantasy,' says eBay CEO (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: In the race to deliver online shopping purchases faster, drones don't impress eBay's CEO. "We're not focusing on long-term fantasies, we're focusing on things we can do today," John Donahue said in an interview. He was reacting to an interview Jeff Bezos, CEO of e-commerce rival Amazon, gave last weekend in which he said Amazon is investigating the use of drones for package delivery.

Submission + - Encrypted social network vies for disgruntled Facebook users (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: With the look of Google Plus and Facebook-like elements, a new social network named "Syme" feels as cozy as a well-worn shoe. But beneath the familiar veneer, it's quite different. Syme encrypts all content, such as status updates, photos and files, so that only people invited to a group can view it. Syme, which hosts the content on its Canada-based servers, says it can't read it. "The overarching goal of Syme is to make encryption accessible and easy to use for people who aren't geeks or aren't hackers or who aren't cryptography experts," co-founder Jonathan Hershon said in an interview about the service.

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