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Submission + - poll suggestion

Red Midnight writes: How do you pronounce "SQL"?
- sequel
- squirrel
- ess-queue-elle
- NoSQL you insensitive clod
(plus whatever you can think of..)
Security

Submission + - Bug in latest Linux gives untrusted users root (theregister.co.uk) 1

Red Midnight writes: Theo De Raadt offered these kind words on the OpenBSD misc mailing list:

If anyone wants a choice quote from me about the recent Linux holes,
this is what I have to say:

        Linus is too busy thinking about masturabating monkeys, he doesn't
        have time to care about Linux security.

For the record, this particular problem was resolved in OpenBSD a
while back, in 2008. We are not super proud of the solution, but it
is what seems best faced with a stupid Intel architectural choice.
However, it seems that everyone else is slowly coming around to the
same solution.

Comment This entire conversation is rediculous (Score 4, Insightful) 354

Why are we even talking about this? The prof was either a complete idiot (and should put his Ph.D. back in the cereal box he got it from) or intentionally broke the law as some act of defiance. What is unclear? He knows he's working on a "secret" project used by the military. He probably got told 6 ways through Sunday he can't talk about it. And he goes to jail because he did what he was told to not do. To say he should not get jail time, or that he's from an academic world, defies logic and COMMON SENSE. Gee, this is a secret military project, I think I'll not only take the data/laptop to China, but I'll share it with Chinese and Iranian students. Gimme a break. It makes no sense. It's much more likely, IMHO, that he was giving a one-finger salute to the US. Even if he weren't, he's a moron, and ignorance of the law is not a valid defence.
The Media

BBC's iPlayer Chief Pushes Tiered Charging For ISPs 172

rs232 writes with a link to a story at The Register which begins: "The executive in charge of the BBC iPlayer has suggested that internet users could be charged £10 per month extra on their broadband bill for higher quality streaming." The article suggests (perhaps optimistically) that "after years of selling consumers pipes, not what they carry, [tiered, site-specific pricing] would be tough to pull off."

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