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Comment Re:Linux (Score 1) 83

Thanks! But too late. That machine died this time last year, after 6 years of excellent service. I moved on to new hardware.

Hopefully the xorg.conf is useful to someone else.

I've just looked up what people are saying about DebugWait, and I see the font corruption - that's just one of the types of corruption I saw!
But perhaps that was the only kind left by the time my laptop died.

Just a note to others, that DebugWait doesn't fix the font corruption for everyone according to reports. But, it's reported as fixed by the time of the kernel in Ubuntu 13.04 according to https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubu...

I stand by my view that Intel GPU support never quite reached "excellent" because of various long term glitches, although I'd give it a "pretty good" and still recommend Intel GPUs (as long as you don't get the PowerVR ones - very annoying that was, that surprise wrecked a job I was on). Judging by the immense number of kernel patches consistently over years, it has received a lot of support, and in most ways worked well.

Getting slightly back on topic with nVidia: Another laptop I've used has an nVidia GPU, and that's been much, much worse under Ubuntu throughout its life, than the laptop with Intel GPU. Some people say nVidia's good for them with Linux, but not this laptop. Have tried all available drivers, Nouveau, nVidia, nVidia's newer versions etc. Nothing works well, Unity3d always renders ("chugs") about 2-3 frames per second when it animates anything, which is barely usable, the GPU temperature gets very hot when it does the slightest things, and visiting any WebGL page in Firefox instantly crashes X with a segmentation fault due to a bug in OpenGL somewhere, requiring a power cycle to recover properly. So I'd still rate nVidia poorer than Intel in my personal experience of Linux on laptops :)

Comment Re:Linux (Score 1) 83

Now? Intel GPU support has been excellent under Linux even back when the crusty GMA chips were all we had.

Except for the bugs. I used Linux, including tracking the latest kernels, for over 6 years with my last laptop having an Intel 915GM.

Every version of the kernel during that time rendered occasional display glitches of one sort or another, such as a line or spray of random pixels every few weeks. Rare but not bug free.

And that's just using a terminal window. It couldn't even blit or render text with 100% reliability...

I investigated one of those bugs and it was a genuine bug in the kernel's tracking of cache flushes and command queuing.
In the process I found more bugs than I cared to count in the modesetting code.

Considering the number of people working on the Intel drivers and the time span (6 years) that was really surprising, but that's how it was.

Comment Re:brighter? (Score 1) 376

Did you know that common kitchen knives can also be used by Billy Joe Bob to blind someone, or worse kill them? Just wait until you manage to tick Billy Joe Bob off. This cannot end well.

Clearly, kitchen knives should not be made, either.

Look, if people are going to attack, maim, or murder someone, they've got plenty of options already. Adding one to the potential arsenal, especially one that would take significant technical know-how to be able to turn into an actual weapon, isn't really going to change things.

Comment Re:Common sense? In MY judiciary? (Score 5, Insightful) 457

Seems as though the police should actually want people to know about the speed traps. I mean, the ultimate goal for the police is to have everyone follow the law. If people know about an upcoming speed trap, then they'll slow down to the speed limit. If they don't know about the speed trap, then they'll continue to endanger those around them by driving too fast. </delightfully naive> Of course, we all know that what the police really want is ticket revenue. The more law breakers there are, the more revenue they get, and hence they will try to stop people from warning others to obey the law. This system is rather broken.

Comment Re:Precisely (Score 1) 1098

In addition to what others said about the FSF discouraging the LGPL, it is also not allowed to statically link LGPL code to non-(L)GPL closed code. You can only link dynamically unless you provide full source.

Nonetheless, statically linking with LGPL libraries in the form of uClibc is _extremely_ common in commercial devices running uClinux. Without providing any way to relink. Forbidden, but ignored.

Comment Re: Basic Statistics (Score 1) 312

Careful. Chebyshev's inequality doesn't help you if you are sampling from a physical process with a Cauchy distribution. Be careful not to confuse the *sample* standard deviation with the *population* standard deviation. The former always exists. The latter is what you use with Chebyshev's inequality... *if* it exists. In the case of a Cauchy distribution, your sample standard deviation would mislead you into thinking that the probability to fall outside N sample standard deviations had some particular bound that it did not have.

Comment Re:So you want to retire a statistical term... (Score 1) 312

He's rather requesting the people start using a different statistical measure of spread, the mean *absolute* deviation, rather than the square root of the mean *squared* deviation (the standard deviation). I'm not familiar enough with it's particular characteristics to say whether or not this would be an improvement in any rigorous sense, but I'd be surprised if it were. So "Get bent." is probably still the right attitude.

Comment Re:Would those data scientists with PhDs (Score 3, Insightful) 312

I know several people who have left high energy physics to become data scientists. Nobody in HEP calls themselves a "data scientist", but that's (some of) what we do anyway. It's just analysis of very large data sets. Unlike in the life sciences, both HEP and many commercial / industrial environments have sufficiently large data sets that very complex questions can be asked and answered. You can never have "enough data" -- if you think you have "enough data", then you aren't asking hard enough questions.

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