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Comment What if Microsoft had pulled this "bullshit" (Score 1) 299

First of all, this is old news. Secondly, has it occurred to anyone that if Microsoft had pulled this stunt, the resident "Slashdoter's" would have been up in arms crying over the inhuman policy of a tyrannical corporate entity. However, since it is Google, who personally I believe is far more evil than Microsoft, the posts are mostly low keyed and benign in nature.
Firefox

Submission + - Mozilla Firefox browser upgrade taken offline due to vulnerability (bbc.co.uk)

Pigskin-Referee writes: The latest version of Mozilla's Firefox browser has been taken offline after a security vulnerability was discovered.

Users who had upgraded to version 16 were advised to downgrade to the previous safe release until Firefox developers released a fix.

The vulnerability allowed "a malicious site to potentially determine which websites users have visited", Mozilla said.

The non-profit company said that only a "limited number of users are affected".

The download had been taken off-line within a day of its initial release, the organization's UK spokesman said.

Comment Re:There are no Facts (Score 1) 1469

<quote><p>I wouldn't be so sure his flawed understanding of rape and conception is his motivation for opposing abortion in the case of rape.</p><p>I understand women can get pregnant from a rape, but still think abortion in the case of rape should be outlawed. The child is still a life and isn't responsible for the rape. Therefore, the child doesn't deserve to be punished with death for a crime he or she didn't commit.</p></quote>

I am going to assume you are a male and therefore would never be put into the position of having to carry an unwanted pregnancy resulting from a rape to term. The entire question of abortion should be left to women since they are the only sector of the human race that actually has to perform that chore. If men and not women were the ones to become pregnant, the legality of abortion would never have been questioned.

Comment Re:Give it away for free (Score 0) 330

<quote>Last I read, they were making a lot of money selling operating systems. It's their bread and butter. They're already also making a lot of money selling other things, so why change a formula that is successful? I think most linux users and definitely most osx users are using the other operating systems for reasons other than the cost of the OS license, so I wonder how many new users a move like that would really attract.</quote>

While there is no doubt some truth in your statement regarding "OS X", the vast majority of Linux users that I know are using it primarily because they either cannot afford to purchase a full MS License or are socialist and believe everything should be handed to them sans payment of any kind. If Microsoft were to sell its operating systems for a token amount, say $25 or $50 it would cut a huge hole through the *.nix user base.
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft unfurls patent lasso, snares Linux servers (theregister.co.uk)

Pigskin-Referee writes: Microsoft’s crusade to lock Linux companies into patent protection deals has netted Redmond’s first service provider.

Amdocs Software Systems is paying Microsoft to license undisclosed Redmond patents in a deal that "provides mutual access to each company’s patent portfolio".

The deal extends to the Linux servers running in Amdoc’s data centres, with the unidentified boxes receiving a licence under Microsoft’s patent portfolio. Specific terms of the deal were not announced, including how much Amdocs will pay Microsoft.

Until now, Microsoft has focused its efforts on device makers whose systems run Android Linux – HTC, General Dynamics Itronix, Onkyo Corp and Velocity Micro – in addition to Acer, ViewSonic and Casio. To our knowledge, this is Microsoft’s first strike at the server market. Amdocs specialises in customer and network management and service delivery systems for operators such as cable TV companies.

Comment They win either way (Score 1) 1

Windows 8 is really nothing more than a BETA test for Windows 9. With the FOSS condemning them at every turn and thereby giving adding to the advertising of Windows 8, they have very little to lose. Even if it is only moderately successful, it will give Microsoft the needed information on how to proceed with Windows 10. In any event, with the FOSS expressing their displeasure with the OS, (sour grapes), it will force the FOSS to try and play catchup. I don't see how they can lose.
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft's Windows 8: tragic mistake or stroke of genius? (sciencefictionworld.com) 1

bowman9991 writes: "When Windows 8 hits 26 October with multiple new tablets, PC desktop machines and ultra-books (and a new version of Microsoft Office), PC users everywhere will suddenly be faced with Microsoft's radically designed "Metro" user interface. Have Microsoft made a massive mistake by introducing an operating system that appears at first glance to be focused on touch and tablets when the majority still use non-touch machines? Or have they built a software system that will impress and thrive on any hardware form factor? Windows Vista or the greatest unified software master stroke of the 21st century?"
Security

Submission + - NVIDIA Kills Online Store In Response to Hacker Claims (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: Following a shutdown of its “NVIDIA Developer Zone,” earlier this week after the online community for developers had been hacked, graphics chip maker NVIDIA on Friday also shut down its online store located at store.nvidia.com.

The group of hackers behind the attack, going by the handle of “The Appollo Project”, made mention of the claimed compromise in its original post exhibiting its successful attack against the NVIDIA Developer Zone site.

While the company has shut down the online store, it has not acknowledged that a successful attack has taken place. “NVIDIA has suspended operation of the NVIDIA Gear Store (store.nvidia.com) as a precaution, following confirmed attacks on several of our other sites,” a statement on the site posted on Jun 13 read.

Commenting on the developer forum hack, the claimed attackers noted, “We aren't acting extremely maliciously, we've used this database to target disgusting corporations who deserve to be brought to justice.. and we are getting there, slowly but surely.”

Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft's Controvercial Magic Constant For HyperV (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: Who said Microsoft developers don't have a sense of humor. Even if that humor is sexist. Our own Matthew Garrett, UEFI secure boot fame, has posted a blog about the magic constant Microsoft used in its HyperV code.

Matthew writes: Paolo Bonzini noticed something a little awkward in the Linux kernel support code for Microsoft's HyperV virtualisation environment — specifically, that the magic constant passed through to the hypervisor was "0xB16B00B5", or, in English, "BIG B**BS". It turns out that this isn't an exception — when the code was originally submitted it also contained "0x0B00B135". That one got removed when the Xen support code was ripped out.

Google

Submission + - Lone Grad Student Scooped the Government (motherjones.com)

Pigskin-Referee writes: Jonathan Mayer had a hunch.

A gifted computer scientist, Mayer suspected that online advertisers might be getting around browser settings that are designed to block tracking devices known as cookies. If his instinct was right, advertisers were following people as they moved from one website to another even though their browsers were configured to prevent this sort of digital shadowing. Working long hours at his office, Mayer ran a series of clever tests in which he purchased ads that acted as sniffers for the sort of unauthorized cookies he was looking for. He hit the jackpot, unearthing one of the biggest privacy scandals of the past year: Google was secretly planting cookies on a vast number of iPhone browsers. Mayer thinks millions of iPhones were targeted by Google.

Google

Submission + - Google CEO says "nothing seriously wrong" (yahoo.com)

Pigskin-Referee writes: Google Inc Chief Executive Larry Page has reassured employees about his health, but the company on Friday shed little additional light on an unspecified condition affecting his voice that will sideline him from two high-profile events in the coming weeks.

Page told employees in an email on Thursday that there was "nothing seriously wrong with me," according to a source who had seen an internal staff memo.

The 39-year-old Google co-founder sat out his company's annual shareholders' meeting on Thursday because he had "lost his voice," according to Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt, who informed attendees of the news at the start of the event.

Google

Submission + - UK reopens investigation into Google Street View (msn.com)

Pigskin-Referee writes: Britain's data regulator has reopened its investigation into Google's Street View, saying Tuesday that an inquiry by authorities in the United States raised new doubts about the disputed program.

Steve Eckersley, enforcement chief of the British Information Commissioner's Office, said Google Inc. had questions to answer about Street View, an attention-grabbing project which sent camera-toting vehicles across the globe to create three-dimensional maps of the world's highways and byways.

But the cars weren't just taking pictures: They were scooping up passwords, Web addresses, emails, and other sensitive data transmitted over unsecured wireless networks.

There was outrage on both sides of the Atlantic when the data-slurping was exposed in early 2010, and the Information Commissioner's Office was one of several European agencies which investigated Street View in the aftermath of the scandal. But in November of that year, the ICO gave Google a mere slap on the wrist, saying that while Google had violated British data protection laws it would escape any fines so long as it pledged not to do it again.

At the time, Google insisted that the breach was an accident.

"We did not want this data, have never used any of it on our products and services, and have sought to delete it as quickly as possible," the company claimed back then.

Evidence made public earlier this year by the Federal Communications Commission has since punctured Google's "oops-I-took-your-data" defense.

Comment Re:If microsoft controls the 'keys' (Score 1) 809

<quote><p>How can this be legal and not an abuse of their monopoly power?</p><p>Aside from the fact you can turn it off ( for now ) it still sounds like a clear case of abuse to me and someone should be talking to an attorney about this.</p></quote>

The simple fact that it can be turned off defeats your argument. Plus, are you so naive to believe that no one, i.e. Microsoft, Symantec/Verisign, Red Hat, etcetera have not properly vetted this with legal counsel?

In any case, vendors who make the hardware are the only ones who could be sued. Microsoft can make any software they want. If the vendors don't make adjustments to their hardware to facilitate its operation, then that is the end of it. Second, vendors can make any hardware they want. They are under no legal obligation to make any specific hardware that suits any specific environment. Failure to do so may well cost them money; however, they are legally allowed to do so.

This is just another example of the FOSS being a day late and a dollar short again. This entire scenario was announced nearly 18 months ago. What did the FOSS do? As usually, nothing. Procrastination is its own punishment.
Microsoft

Submission + - If VLC can ship a free DVD player, why can't Microsoft? (zdnet.com)

Pigskin-Referee writes: Microsoft’s decision to remove support for playing DVD movies in Windows 8 has caused some confusion. If the VLC media player can provide DVD support for free, why can’t Microsoft? For starters, Microsoft isn’t French. Microsoft announced this week that Windows 8 will not support playback of DVD movies unless you explicitly add software that supports that feature. The economic reasons for doing so are compelling (see Microsoft’s follow-up FAQ for details ), but it’s also a potentially disruptive move for some Windows enthusiasts. So it’s not surprising that some of the initial reactions have been heated and even angry. I look at the big numbers and walk through the math in a follow-up post; How much do DVD and digital media playback features really cost?

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