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Hardware Hacking

Submission + - The Patents That Threaten 3-D Printing (wired.com)

An anonymous reader writes: We've watched patents slow down the smartphone and tablet markets. We've seen patent claims thrown against Linux, Android, and countless other software projects. Now, as 3-D printing becomes more capable and more affordable, it seems a number of patents threaten to do the same to the hobbyist and tinkerer crowd. Wired has highlighted some of the most dangerous ones, including: a patent on soluble print materials that support a structure while it's being printed; a ridiculously broad patent on distributed rapid prototyping, which could affect "every 3-D printing service that has launched in the past few years"; and an 18-year-old patent on 3-D printing using a powder and a binding material, held by MIT.

Comment Re:Retrieved Samples Without DPRK's AF Scrambling? (Score 2) 132

Yeah, except Rome fell about 400 years later. You could argue that the decline of Rome began with the end of the Republic, but that decline was a drawn out process. It's more of an ideological point. The economically most prosperous years probably were under the Emperors...

Comment Re:Retrieved Samples Without DPRK's AF Scrambling? (Score 1) 132

The Roman expansion seemed to have stopped whenever they ran into cavalry-heavy enemies. They got to Asia Minor, but not into the steppe beyond. Enemies not fighting ordered battles might have been somewhat detrimental to Legion tactics. Hit and run, deny an orderly battle - asymmetric warfare of the ancient world if you like. Not that they ventured often into those territories, but if I recall correctly, whenever they did, it was without significant success.

Submission + - Utilities Racing to Plug Grid Before 'Disaster Strikes' (wsj.com)

FreeMichael61 writes: "In the latest episode of Spy vs. Spy, China rejects accusations its hacking U.S. companies to steal IP or bring down the grid. But there's no doubt the grid can be hacked, CIO Journal's Steve Rosenbush and Rachael King report. Industrial control networks are supposed to be protected from the Internet by an air gap that, it turns out, is largely theoretic. Rosenbush and King detail the attack vectors that hackers could use to bring down the electrical system in a neighborhood near you."

Comment Re:If you want to convince skeptics... (Score 3, Insightful) 848

And what, exactly, distinguishes a lying sack of shit like Monckton or Watts from a holocaust denier? They know they are wrong, they are not that stupid. They lie, lie and lie again, each lie gets debunked multiple times by people actually giving a shit, and 2 weeks later, they spout the same lies in a slightly rephrased manner.

Comment Re:About 3000t mass, and 100kt energy (Score 1) 196

And now imagine that happening just 30 years ago. An object entering on a ballistic trajectory and setting off a 500 kt airblast essentially over the main Soviet plutonium facility in Mayak next to Chelyabinsk. I am retroactively shitting myself right now. As a species, we have more luck than common sense...

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