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Intel

Submission + - Intel challenges ARM on power consumption... and wins. (tomshardware.com)

GhostX9 writes: Tom's Hardware just published a detailed look at the Intel Atom Z2760 in the Acer Iconia W510 and compared it to the NVIDIA Tegra 3 in the Microsoft Surface. They break it down and demonstrate how the full Windows 8 tablet outperforms the Windows RT machine in power consumption. They break down power consumption to include the role of the CPU, GPU, memory controller and display. Anandtech is also reporting similar findings, but only reports CPU and GPU utilization.
Transportation

Submission + - The New Ethanol Blend May Damage Your Vehicle 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "About 80 percent of the gasoline consumed in the US is blended with ethanol, primarily E10 meaning gasoline with a 10 percent mix of ethanol, generally derived from corn. Now Kate Sheppard writes that the Environmental Protection Agency has approved a new policy that will allow states to raise the blend to up to 15 percent ethanol (also known as E15), approved for use for cars and light trucks from the model year 2001 and later. A few weeks ago, AAA issued a statement saying that the EPA's new policy creates the "strong likelihood of consumer confusion and the potential for voided warranties and vehicle damage." The worry is that people will put E15 in their cars without realizing it. AAA surveyed vehicle manufacturers, and found that only about 12 million of the 240 million vehicles on the roads today are built to use E15 gasoline. The EPA will require that gas pumps with E15 bear a warning sign noting the blend and that it is not recommended for cars older than the 2001 model year. But what happens if you accidentally use it? "Nobody really knows what negative effects [E15 is] going to have on the vehicle," says Brian Lyons, Toyota's safety and quality communications manager. "We think that there needs to be a lot more study conducted to make sure there are no longer term effects on the vehicle. So far everything we've seen says there will be." The concern is that repeated, long-term exposure could cause the higher-alcohol-content fuel to degrade engine parts like valves and cylinder heads—which could potentially cost thousands of dollars to replace. Gas station owners don't like it very much either, because they'd likely have to upgrade their equipment to use it. Nor are environmental groups big fans of the EPA's decision arguing that increasing the use of ethanol can drive up food prices, and isn't the best means of reducing our reliance on foreign fuels. The ethanol lobby is the only group that really seems to like the new rule. "We've force fed a fuel into every American's car that benefits a few thousand corn farmers and ethanol refiners at the expense of virtually every other American," says Scott Faber."

Comment Thank you (Score 2) 238

People forget, or never knew, how much bigger of a pain car ownership used to be. I spent the first part of my young adult life keeping the family's '71 Super Beetle alive. Easy to fix is very different from reliable. Brakes that don't self-adjust, carburetor disassembly and cleaning to allow the engine to keep from stalling for a few more months, different starting and driving methods for different temperatures. Maybe a relaxing hobby for some, but a source of life shortening stress if you depend on it for daily transportation.

Now I look forward to the time that we feel sorry for people that had to struggle with 21st century computer hassles.

Comment Re:Unexamined Lives and All That (Score 1) 342

To clarify, the car is a great example of what society is capable of, but the way they are being used is not.

I own a car, but the more it stays in the driveway to rust in peace, the better things are for the world and for me.

Cars can have their place, but with car sharing, car rentals, public transport, I don't plan to replace my car after it dies.

Comment Beautiful Idea (Score 1) 186

How about adding her name in the 'credits' after the other developers' names, perhaps with a short compliment on her qualities as a person? Or associated more closely with your name to avoid the team feeling as if you've appropriated the entire project.

Comment Unexamined Lives and All That (Score 5, Insightful) 342

It took me a while to make the decision to bike to work. In retrospect, my whole life was colored by car culture. They're beautiful machines, and my friends and I spent large amounts of time talking about them and using them.

I also finally realized that our understandable desire to make our lives more comfortable and effortless is ultimately unhealthy.

All my notions and excuses left me, and I've been biking to work every day, unless snow and ice preclude it.

It's such an amazing way to start and end the day, even though it's not glamorized on TV.

On business a few years ago, a nice young man who was shuttling me into downtown Copenhagen in a company car described to me his intense interest in buying his own car, despite the tax disincentives to do so. And China is abandoning their bike culture, making single occupancy vehicle trips a sign of progress. And as an American I've found myself thinking: "It's not obligatory to copy every mistake we've made, feel free to learn from our bad examples."

Submission + - CERN to announce discovery of new particle (businessinsider.com)

djacosta writes: "The physics community is abuzz with the latest news that CERN researchers in Switzerland plan to announce the discovery of the Higgs boson on July 4.
But it looks like someone jumped the gun.
A video confirming the discovering of the new particle was accidentally posted on CERN's website for a brief time this morning, Tom Chivers of The Telegraph reports.
In the video, Joe Incandela, the CMS spokesperson says:
We've observed a new particle. We have quite strong evidence that there's something there. Its properties are still going to take us a little bit of time. But we can see that it decays to two photons, for example, which tells us it's a boson, it's a particle with integer spin. And we know its mass is roughly 100 times the mass of the proton. And this is very significant. This is the most massive such particle that exists, if we confirm all of this, which I think we will."

Submission + - NAVSOP: A robust solution to GPS jamming? (newscientist.com)

dangle writes: BAE Systems has developed a positioning solution that it claims will work even when GPS is unavailable. Its strategy is to use the collection of radio frequency signals from TV, radio and cellphone masts, even WiFi routers, to deduce a position.
BAE's answer is dubbed Navigation via Signals of Opportunity (NAVSOP). It interrogates the airwaves for the ID and signal strength of local digital TV and radio signals, plus air traffic control radars, with finer grained adjustments coming from cellphone masts and WiFi routers. In any given area, the TV, radio, cellphone and radar signals tend to be at constant frequencies and power levels as they are are heavily regulated — so positions could be calculated from them. "The real beauty of NAVSOP is that the infrastructure required to make it work is already in place," says a BAE spokesman — and "software defined radio" microchips that run NAVSOP routines can easily be integrated into existing satnavs. The firm believes the technology could also work in urban concrete canyons where GPS signals cannot currently reach.

Government

Arizona H-1B Workers Advised to Carry Papers At All Times 884

dcblogs writes "In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling Monday on Arizona's immigration enforcement law, H-1B workers are being advised to keep their papers on them. About half of all H-1B visa holders are employed in tech occupations. The court struck down several parts of Arizona's law but nonetheless left in place a core provision allowing police officers to check the immigration status of people in the state at specific times. How complicated this gets may depend on the training of the police officer, his or her knowledge of work visas, and whether an H-1B worker in the state has an Arizona's driver's license. An Arizona state driver's license provides the presumption of legal residency. Nonetheless, H-1B workers could become entangled in this law and suffer delays and even detention while local police, especially those officers and departments unfamiliar with immigration documentation."

Submission + - 3D printer instructions for Lego, K'Nex, adapters (techdirt.com)

dangle writes: F.A.T. Lab and Sy-Lab have officially released their Free Universal Construction Kit, allowing builders to freely interconnect parts from Lego, K'Nex, Fischertechnik and other common building sets. ZomeTool and Zoob patterns will be available after related patents expire. The makers have also spent considerable effort investigating and anticipating legal complaints from manufacturers, using an Inverse Think of The Children Argument:

Some may express concern that the Free Universal Construction Kit infringes such corporate prerogatives as copyright, design right, trade dress, trademarks or patents of the supported toy systems. We encourage those eager to enforce these rights to please think of the children — and we assert that the home printing of the Free Universal Construction Kit constitutes protected fair use.

Security

Submission + - Bruce Schneier debating former TSA Administrator Kip Hawley (economist.com)

McGruber writes: The Economist is hosting a live debate this week on the motion "Airport security: This house believes that changes made to airport security since 9/11 have done more harm than good.

Defending the motion is Bruce Schneier, while former Transportation Security Administration head Edmund S. "Kip" Hawley argues against the motion.

Data Storage

Submission + - Olympic Games to Stress London Data Infrastructure (theverge.com)

kodiaktau writes: The upcoming Olympic games are expected to stress the London data infrastructure with the primary offender being the BBC. The games will be broadcast by the BBC which expects to be broadcasting about 1TB of data per second or the equivalent of 1500 people downloading a full length DVD every minute.
NASA

Submission + - Orion capsule test flight will be the deepest in space since 1972 (video) (tech-stew.com)

techfun89 writes: The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) sits a-top a Delta IV Heavy, ready for a test flight, one of the first ever to reach this deep into space since the Apollo missions of 1972. The year of the test is 2014. The video below breaks down the Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) from launch until splashdown.
We have a real need for such space craft right now, especially in the even of an asteroid threat, but unfortunately, as always, budget constraints keep pushing the future of the space program and exploration into the future.

Bitcoin

Submission + - Linode Exploit Caused Theft Of Thousands Of Bitcoins (bitcoinmedia.com) 2

Sabbetus writes: Popular web hosting service Linode had a serious exploit earlier today. Apparently the super admin password for their server management panel was leaked and allowed a malicious attacker to target multiple Bitcoin-related servers. The biggest loss happened to a major Bitcoin mining pool that lost over 3000 BTC, which is currently worth almost 15 000 USD. Now the question is, will Linode compensate for lost bitcoins?

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