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Submission + - 'Military-Style' Raid on California Power Station Spooks U.S. (foreignpolicy.com) 1

Lasrick writes: Interesting piece about April's physical attack on a power station near San Jose, California, that now looks like a dress rehearsal for future attacks: Quote: "When U.S. officials warn about "attacks" on electric power facilities these days, the first thing that comes to mind is probably a computer hacker trying to shut the lights off in a city with malware. But a more traditional attack on a power station in California has U.S. officials puzzled and worried about the physical security of the the electrical grid--from attackers who come in with guns blazing."

Comment Re:Stop trying (Score 1) 606

More specifically, in a little over 40 years, nobody has successfully made a 'does-it-all' GUI in spite of trying. Since it's not there now, and I see no evidence that it'll be there in the near future, the point stands: if you want to have full use the computer, you'll have to use CLI because there is no turing complete GUI.

Comment Re:Stop trying (Score 1) 606

AppleScript is very much text rather than graphical in nature. More specifically, it is a scripting language that sends events to objects. Those objects may happen to be represented by graphics for the user but that is orthogonal to the scripting. And, as you say, it's not an interactive interface.

The specific comparison is any existing GUI shell vs BASH (or similar).

Submission + - Stretch or Splat? Physicists debate death by black hole (npr.org) 1

gbrumfiel writes: For decades, researchers have thought they understood how black holes kill. Once you slip beyond the event horizon, the theory goes, gravity grows so strong that it spaghettifies you. But that version of events seems to violate Quantum Mechanics, which says that information must be conserved. NPR reports on the debate surrounding a new theory. The theory suggests that to conserve information, space itself must end at a black hole's edge. Anyone who falls "in" the black hole actually goes splat instead. Their information is carried away in quantum-entangled radiation from the edge of the hole. But is it really a hole if it doesn't have an inside? Discuss.

Submission + - Cracking Atlanta Subway's poorly-encrypted RFID Smart Cards is a Breeze (clatl.com)

McGruber writes: Seven metro Atlanta residents are facing theft, fraud, and racketeering charges for allegedly selling counterfeit MARTA Breeze cards (http://clatl.com/freshloaf/archives/2013/12/27/marta-breeze-card-hackers-arrested-and-charged-with-racketeering). Breeze cards (http://www.breezecard.com/) are stored value smart cards that passengers use as part of an automated fare collection system which the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA, http://www.itsmarta.com/) introduced to the general public in October 2006. Breeze cards are supplied by Cubic Transportation Systems (http://cts.cubic.com/), an American company that provides automated fare collection equipment and services to the mass transit industry.

At the time of this slashdot submission, the Wikipedia page for the Breeze Card (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breeze_Card, last modified on 2 August 2013 at 14:52) says:

The Breeze Card uses the MIFARE smart-card system from Dutch company NXP Semiconductors, a spin-off from Philips. The disposable, single-use, cards are using on the MIFARE Ultralight while the multiple-use plastic cards are the MIFARE Classic cards. There have been many concerns about the security of the system, mainly caused by the poor encryption method used for the cards. See Security of MIFARE Classic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIFARE#Security_of_MIFARE_Classic) for details.


Comment Re:Stop trying (Score 1) 606

Most people would not consider an xterm open on a bare X window to be a GUI unless there were things like a drag and drop file manager available. They would consider that to be a CLI.

If you disagree, then you will also accept that the original IBM PC with a Hercules card was a hardware accelerated GUI.

Comment Re:Clemens and Copyright (Score 3, Interesting) 207

You got an extra zero in there, right? As in 7 years sounds about right?

I know some authors protest that seven years is too long, and the majority of income is made in the first three years and after five it would be advantageous to have the works available in the public domain (but the publishers don't want the competition from previously released works), but I think that varies from author to author, so doing a compromise of seven seems reasonable - we can experiment with shortening it further after having seen what happen when we cut it to seven.

Submission + - Sherlock Holmes finally in the public domain in the US 1

ferrisoxide.com writes: As reported on the Australian ABC news website, film-makers in the US are finally free to work on Sherlock Holmes stories without paying a licencing free to the estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle after a ruling by Judge Ruben Castillo.

A quirk of US copyright law kept 10 stories out of the public domain, on the basis that these stories where continuously developed. In his ruling Judge Castillo opined that only the "story elements" in the short stories published after 1923 were protected and that everything else in the Holmes canon was "free for public use" — including the characters of Holmes and Watson.

Holmes scholar Leslie Klinger, who challenged the estate, celebrated the ruling.

"Sherlock Holmes belongs to the world," Mr Klinger said in a statement posted on his Free Sherlock website.

IANAL, but the ruling of Judge Castillo that "adopting Conan Doyle's position would be to extend impermissibly the copyright of certain character elements of Holmes and Watson beyond their statutory period," is surely going to have implications across US copyright law. Mark Twain must be twisting and writhing in his grave.

Comment Re:I wonder . . . (Score 1) 606

UML is a text format. CASE tools tended to let you drag blocks of text around. Googeling shows little more than mapping words onto alternative glyphs that are then organized exactly as words would be in a text file. By that definition, a conventional C program using clever macros so you could program in Chinese would count.

The one thing they all have in common is that they eventually resort to text written on the graphical elements somewhere. None of them actually exploit any innate expressiveness of the graphical display.

They also aren't self hosted for the simple reason that actually writing something that complex with such clumsy tools is impractical.

But more to the point, none of that is a shell. They have GUIs but they are not GUIs.

Perhaps someone will eventually figure out some way to manage it, but thus far, nobody has. Not even to the point of being able to tell the computer "see this group of files named as report-MMDDYY? Make them YYYYMMDD-report.txt".

Upon more thought I believe it may be posable but I doubt it will be practical.

Submission + - Department Store Chain's Website Crashes and Can't Get Back Up (brisbanetimes.com.au) 1

McGruber writes: Myer, Australia's largest department store chain, has closed its website (meyer.com.au) "until further notice" at the height of the post-Christmas (and Australian summer) sales season.

The website crashed on Christmas Day and has been down ever since. This means Myer will see no benefit for those days from booming domestic online sales, which were tipped to hit $344 million across the retail sector on Boxing Day alone.

Teams from IBM and Myer's information technology division were "working furiously" to fix the problem.

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