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Space

Submission + - New Theory on Origin and Future of the Universe (newswise.com)

deepcleanfun writes: "The universes clock has neither a start nor finish, yet time is finite according to a New Zealand theorist. The theory, which tackles the age-old mystery of the origin of the universe, along with several other problems and paradoxes in cosmology, calls for a new take on our concept of time."
Biotech

Submission + - Formula One Must Go Green (wired.com)

PJ1216 writes: "The Federation Internationale de l'Automobile has announced a ban on further investment into F1 engines and must look into more environmentally friendly technology. From the article, "The biggest teams — Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, Honda and Toyota among them — each spend $200 million or more a year on fossil-fuel technology with little real-world application. But now the sport's ruling body has said, "Enough," and banned further investment in F1 engines. Teams must now focus on hybrid systems and other eco-friendly means of producing power."
Looks like the race needs more green than just a flag. The upshot of this is that this will spur eco-friendly technology that can make its way onto our streets and into our cars."

The Courts

Submission + - Ohio University finds key to getting RIAA to stop 7

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "Ohio University, in Athens, Ohio, has found the key to getting the RIAA to stop inundating it and its students with "settlement" letters. According to the university's student online publication, the university paid $60,000, plus $16,000 per year "maintenance", to Audible Magic, the business partner of the RIAA's all-purpose expert witness Dr. Doug Jacobson, for its "CopySense" filtering software. Once it made the payments, the letters stopped. This of course raises a lot of questions as to the 'disinterestedness' of Dr. Jacobson, whose deposition in the UMG v. Lindor case was the subject of interesting Slashdot commentary."
Patents

Submission + - End of VoIP in the US?

fermion writes: The register is reporting that Vonage can't work around Verizon's VoIP patents. Combined with the judges interpretation of the patents, this seems to indicate that competitive VoIP, at least i the US, is dead. I can see shades of the bad of days when AT&T rented phones at an exorbitant rate and invented a new charge every month.

The only hope appears to be that "According to Paul Derry, from patent experts Venner Shipley, most of Verizon's claims should only apply to companies with servers located in the US, even if services are being offered to US citizens." Perhaps Iceland is to become the server capital of the world.
Mozilla

Submission + - Firefox usage close to 25% in Europe.

donstenk72 writes: "Firefox cannot be stopped: close to 25% of the Europeans use the open source browser, according to the Xiti monitor.

http://www.xitimonitor.com/en-us/browsers-baromete r/firefox-march-2007/index-1-2-3-77.html.

In Slovenia usage tops 40% whilst France, Germany and Finland show a percentage that is much higher than the world average.

Not really a surprise, many Europeans are open to alternatives, particularly when they work well!"
The Almighty Buck

Submission + - Is Coal (Yes, Coal) the Next Hot Technology?

nlseaver writes: From a greenhouse gas perspective, coal is one of our dirtiest sources of energy. It's also widely available and cheap, and so it will continue to be a critical source of energy in the twenty-first century. Despite hopes for "clean coal" technology, no clear solution has emerged. Furthermore, because no policy framework (like a carbon tax or incentives to invest in clean technology) yet exists, coal companies are putting into place long-lived "dirty" coal facilities. As the article states: "Within the next few years, power companies are planning to build about 150 coal plants to meet growing electricity demands. Despite expectations that global warming rules are coming, almost none of the plants will be built to capture the thousands of tons of carbon dioxide that burning coal spews into the atmosphere." http://select.nytimes.com/mem/tnt.html?emc=tnt&tnt get=2007/02/21/business/21coal.html&tntemail1=y
Spam

Submission + - Can anti-spamming laws ever be enforced?

paulraps writes: In the three years since Sweden made spamming a criminal offence, the authority set up to enforce the law has received 72,121 complaints, reports The Local. The result of investigations into these cases was one single prosecution. And that was dropped. The ratio of 72,121:1:0 begs the question — how can legislation against spammers ever be enforced?

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